Conditions & Diseases

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MRSA is very contagious, says About.com. MRSA is a common concern in hospitals and residential care facilities, but infections may break out in gyms, contact sports, jails, military barracks and other overcrowded spaces, explains Mayo Clinic.

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  • How Do You Cure TMJ With Jaw Exercises?

    Q: How Do You Cure TMJ With Jaw Exercises?

    A: Slow, gentle jaw exercises are likely to improve jaw mobility and healing, according to The TMJ Association. Therapeutic jaw exercises have been found to bring earlier recovery of jaw function.
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  • What Causes the Veins to Bulge in the Hands and Arms?

    Q: What Causes the Veins to Bulge in the Hands and Arms?

    A: According to Scientific American, veins bulge on the arms and hands as well as other body parts, such as the legs, during and directly after a workout because of the increased arterial blood pressure's physiological mechanisms. WebMD identifies other possible causes of bulging veins in various areas of the body, including blood clots, varicose veins and peripheral venous disease.
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  • Why Does Thyroid Disease Occur?

    Q: Why Does Thyroid Disease Occur?

    A: Thyroid disease is caused by the overproduction or underproduction of the thyroid hormones, according to WebMD. Overproduction is known as hyperthyroidism, while underproduction is known as hypothyroidism. Both types of thyroid disease are caused by a lack of proper thyroid hormone production regulation, resulting in a severe hormone imbalance.
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  • What Causes Gray Hair?

    Q: What Causes Gray Hair?

    A: There are many different reasons why hair turns gray, but the primary cause is genetics. Each of the hair follicles, where hair is produced, contains cells called melanocytes. These melanocytes produce the melanin needed to color hair; they gradually die in time so that hair will receive less melanin, according to KidsHealth.
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  • Who Is the Longest Living HIV Positive Person?

    Q: Who Is the Longest Living HIV Positive Person?

    A: There are many claims but no substantiated evidence to verify the actual duration of any individuals illness with HIV. However, several people have been living with this illness for over three decades.
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  • What Causes Stomach Cramps While Running?

    Q: What Causes Stomach Cramps While Running?

    A: Shallow breathing is a frequent cause of stomach cramps that occur while running, says Jeff Galloway, a 1972 Olympian. Consuming too much food or fluid contributes to shallow breathing. Low levels of sodium, potassium and calcium also lead to stomach cramps.
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  • What Causes Gout?

    Q: What Causes Gout?

    A: Gout is the result of a buildup of uric acid in the body that causes needle-like deposits of urate crystals in the soft tissues or joints in the body, according to the American College of Rheumatology. This condition is often known as the disease of kings because it is associated with an overindulgence in certain foods and beverages. Some medications are also associated with gout attacks.
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  • Why Do You Pass Out When You Hyperventilate?

    Q: Why Do You Pass Out When You Hyperventilate?

    A: Hyperventilation causes too much oxygen to be taken in and carbon dioxide to be discarded too quickly, which causes fainting, as explained by WebMD. Acute hyperventilation is often triggered by anxiety or a specific phobia. Acute decreases in carbon dioxide can lower cerebral blood flow and cause neurologic symptoms such as syncope, seizure, dizziness and confusion.
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  • How Long Do People With Down Syndrome Live?

    Q: How Long Do People With Down Syndrome Live?

    A: According to the Mayo Clinic, people with Down syndrome typically live at least 60 years. About one hundred years ago, however, people with the condition often died before they reached age 10.
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  • What Happens to Amputated Limbs?

    Q: What Happens to Amputated Limbs?

    A: The Sisters of Providence Health System reports that amputated limbs are disposed of by the hospital or a patient makes his own arrangements for burial or cremation of the limb. The fate of an amputated limb is determined by the patient, and he must consent to either outcome.
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  • What Causes a Collapsed Gallbladder?

    Q: What Causes a Collapsed Gallbladder?

    A: A gallbladder may collapse due to a condition called chronic cholecystitis, which inflames and shrinks the gallbladder, according to MedlinePlus. Gallstones are a major contributing factor to repeated acute attacks of cholecystitis.
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  • What Is Rheumatoid Arthritis?

    Q: What Is Rheumatoid Arthritis?

    A: Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disorder that affects the joints and causes painful swelling, which can lead to bone erosion and joint deformity. According to the Mayo Clinic, rheumatoid arthritis is the result of a person's immune system attacking its own tissues.
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  • Can Back Pain Cause Nausea?

    Q: Can Back Pain Cause Nausea?

    A: Back pain and nausea commonly occur simultaneously due to the same or similar causes. According to Healthline, the pain associated with digestive problems often radiates to the back, such as in the case of biliary colic. Nausea is an uncomfortable feeling in the stomach that makes the sufferer feel like vomiting. Back pain, on the other hand, is the physical discomfort in the back that can be caused by various issues.
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  • What Is Third-Stage Kidney Failure?

    Q: What Is Third-Stage Kidney Failure?

    A: In the third stage of kidney failure, an individual has a moderate amount of damage to the kidneys due to chronic kidney disease. DaVita Health Care Partners lists these symptoms as including fatigue, fluid retention, changes in urination, kidney pain and sleep problems.
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  • How Do You Treat a Slipped Disc in the Back?

    Q: How Do You Treat a Slipped Disc in the Back?

    A: According to the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, a slipped herniated disk is treated with nonsurgical or surgical methods. Nonsurgical treatments, such as bed rest, are most common. Other nonsurgical treatments that help to alleviate back pain are medication, injections and physical therapy. A small percentage of people with a slipped disk require spine surgery after nonsurgical methods fail to relieve severe discomfort.
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  • What Causes a Burning Pain in the Armpit?

    Q: What Causes a Burning Pain in the Armpit?

    A: While many conditions may cause irritation in the armpits, WebMD notes that intertrigo usually causes a burning sensation along with redness and itching. When a person has intertrigo, the moist, warm skin becomes irritated and often mildly infected. A rash also typically appears between the folds of the skin.
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  • Can a Pinched Nerve Cause Headaches?

    Q: Can a Pinched Nerve Cause Headaches?

    A: University of Maryland Medical Center reports that a pinched nerve in the neck can cause headaches in the back of the head, called occipital headaches. This condition also causes pain in the neck, shoulder, arm and hand, according to UMMC.
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  • What Happens If the Cerebral Cortex Is Damaged?

    Q: What Happens If the Cerebral Cortex Is Damaged?

    A: What happens when the cerebral cortex is damaged depends on the location of the damage, according to The University of Washington. As the largest part of the brain, the cerebral cortex is composed of the frontal, parietal, occipital and temporal lobes. Damage to each of these lobes produces different symptoms.
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  • How Do You Treat an Ear Infection?

    Q: How Do You Treat an Ear Infection?

    A: The best treatment for an ear infection depends on whether the infection is caused by a virus or bacterial organism. Antibiotics do not kill viruses, so they are only used to treat infections caused by bacteria. The only way to treat a viral ear infection is to treat the symptoms, according to WebMD.
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  • Why Do Men Go Bald?

    Q: Why Do Men Go Bald?

    A: The most common cause of male hair loss is androgenic alopecia, otherwise known as male-pattern baldness, states the American Hair Loss Association. Sufferers of this condition have hair follicles with a genetic sensitivity to a substance called Dihydrotestosterone, or DHT, which causes the hair's life cycle to shorten prematurely, leading to thinning and falling hair. Other causes of hair loss in men include illness, old age and lifestyle habits.
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  • What Causes Light Spots to Appear on Skin?

    Q: What Causes Light Spots to Appear on Skin?

    A: WebMD states that vitiligo and pityriasis alba cause light patches on the skin. While people of any color can have these two conditions, it is most easily seen on dark skin. Pityriasis alba mostly occurs on the skin of black children.
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