Conditions & Diseases

A:

A quick cold is caught through contact with an infected person or by touching a surface contaminated with a cold virus and then touching the nose or mouth, according to WebMD. Common surfaces that possess cold viruses include keyboards, doorknobs and eating utensils. The virus infects people by attaching to the lining of their throats or noses, and the body's immune response to the virus causes the symptoms.

See Full Answer
Filed Under:
  • Can You Die From Tonsillitis?

    Q: Can You Die From Tonsillitis?

    A: It is extremely rare to die from tonsillitis, according to the American Academy Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery. This stems from the quality of medical and surgical interventions available today.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What Is Leech Therapy Used For?

    Q: What Is Leech Therapy Used For?

    A: Leech therapy is the medicinal use of leeches to treat disease and reattach or transplant limbs. Leech therapy is advocated in a number of treatment processes as the worms contain compounds and enzymes in their saliva that have an anti-coagulating effect on the blood and anti-inflammatory, bacteriostatic, vasodilating properties, notes Mehdi Leech Therapist.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What Is the Best Treatment for Head Lice?

    Q: What Is the Best Treatment for Head Lice?

    A: According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the best treatment for head lice includes the use of over-the-counter medicines with the active ingredient of pyrethrins or a 1 percent solution of permethrin lotion. WebMD also recommends the use of shampoos containing piperonyl butoxide.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • How Can I Prevent Tendonitis of the Thumb?

    Q: How Can I Prevent Tendonitis of the Thumb?

    A: Westchester Magazine suggests avoiding, or resting and stretching between, repetitive thumb motions such as knitting, cleaning, sports motions or texting to prevent tendonitis of the thumb. If the symptoms of tendonitis appear in the thumb, avoid or limit aggravating activities and apply a cold pack for periods of five to 15 minutes throughout the day.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • Why Do You Use a Cane on the Opposite Side of an Injured Leg?

    Q: Why Do You Use a Cane on the Opposite Side of an Injured Leg?

    A: Mayo Clinic explains that when a cane is used for extra support because of a leg injury or disability, it is held by the hand opposite the injury to move along with the injured leg for extra support. The cane is lifted at the same time as the affected leg when the stronger leg is firmly on the ground.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • How Do You Contract Ebola?

    Q: How Do You Contract Ebola?

    A: A person may contract Ebola following contact with an infected individual's blood, urine, sweat, semen, breast milk, saliva, feces and other body fluids, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Transmission of Ebola also occurs through contact with infected animals or objects contaminated with the virus.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What Is Bell's Palsy?

    Q: What Is Bell's Palsy?

    A: According to Mayo Clinic, Bell's palsy refers to sudden paralysis or weakness of facial muscles, making one side of the face look like it is drooping. Smiles become one-sided, with the eye of the affected side having resistance to closing. Bell's palsy may also be referred to as facial palsy.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • How Do You Treat an Ear Infection?

    Q: How Do You Treat an Ear Infection?

    A: The best treatment for an ear infection depends on whether the infection is caused by a virus or bacterial organism. Antibiotics do not kill viruses, so they are only used to treat infections caused by bacteria. The only way to treat a viral ear infection is to treat the symptoms, according to WebMD.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • How Do You Get HIV?

    Q: How Do You Get HIV?

    A: A person can get HIV through sexual intercourse, blood transfusions, needle sharing, breast-feeding or pregnancy, according to Mayo Clinic. A person cannot get HIV through kissing or touching.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • How Long Should You Wait to Get a Tetanus Shot After Stepping on a Nail?

    Q: How Long Should You Wait to Get a Tetanus Shot After Stepping on a Nail?

    A: According to WebMD, it is imperative that individuals who step on a nail receive a tetanus shot immediately following the injury. It is also important for individuals with nail puncture wounds who have recently received a tetanus shot to contact a physician to ensure proper wound care and treatment.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • Are Throat Polyps Serious?

    Q: Are Throat Polyps Serious?

    A: According to the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, throat polyps are not malignant but can cause serious problems, especially if the voice is important to the patient’s career. Polyps are soft growths that develop on the vocal cords, causing hoarseness and other vocal problems as well as throat pain.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • Will HIV Always Become Full Blown AIDS?

    Q: Will HIV Always Become Full Blown AIDS?

    A: In a minority of people infected with HIV, the disease never progresses to AIDS, as noted in the journal "AIDS Research and Treatment." Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome is the final stage of HIV infection, after the immune system has become so compromised it can no longer fight off other infections.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • How Does Autism Affect the Body?

    Q: How Does Autism Affect the Body?

    A: Dr. Arshya Vahabzadeh explains in Huffpost Healthy Living that autism links to a number of afflictions affecting the body including epilepsy, sleep disorders, movement problems and psychiatric disorders. Vahabzadeh also refers to a study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that explains that children diagnosed with autism have a greater risk of frequent diarrhea or episodes of colitis.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • How Do You Treat a Slipped Disc in the Back?

    Q: How Do You Treat a Slipped Disc in the Back?

    A: According to the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, a slipped herniated disk is treated with nonsurgical or surgical methods. Nonsurgical treatments, such as bed rest, are most common. Other nonsurgical treatments that help to alleviate back pain are medication, injections and physical therapy. A small percentage of people with a slipped disk require spine surgery after nonsurgical methods fail to relieve severe discomfort.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • How Does Dyslexia Affect Math Skills?

    Q: How Does Dyslexia Affect Math Skills?

    A: According to the International Dyslexia Association, dyslexia harms the ability of students to learn and apply math skills due to the effect of dyslexia on a person's verbal cognitive processes. According to the National Center for Learning Disabilities, dyslexia that affects mathematical skills can also be called dyscalculia.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What Causes Dry Mouth While Sleeping?

    Q: What Causes Dry Mouth While Sleeping?

    A: Causes of dry mouth include diet, prescription or over-the-counter drugs, aging, and other health conditions. Having a dry mouth while sleeping is is caused by insufficient saliva in the throat and mouth.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • How Long Can HIV Survive Outside the Human Body?

    Q: How Long Can HIV Survive Outside the Human Body?

    A: HIV is capable of surviving outside the human body for a period of several weeks in certain conditions, according to NAM AIDSmap. The body fluid in question and the quantity of the virus contained in the fluid affect the survival period, as does temperature and acidity.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What Are the Different Types of Osteoporosis?

    Q: What Are the Different Types of Osteoporosis?

    A: According to WebMD, there are four types of osteoporosis: idiopathic juvenile osteoporosis, primary osteoporosis, secondary osteoporosis and ostogenesis imperfecta. Primary osteoporosis is the most common form of the condition and is caused by natural bone loss that occurs in individuals over 30 years of age.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What Are the Short-Term Effects of Bulimia?

    Q: What Are the Short-Term Effects of Bulimia?

    A: According to QuickCare.org, common short-term effects of bulimia are unhealthy weight gain or loss, broken blood vessels in the eyes, puffy or swollen cheeks and painful salivary glands. Other short-term effects include dehydration, constipation, diarrhea, abdominal bloating and cramps, fatigue, sleep problems and decreased self-esteem. These effects can occur even after someone binges and purges only a few times.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What Happens If the Cerebral Cortex Is Damaged?

    Q: What Happens If the Cerebral Cortex Is Damaged?

    A: What happens when the cerebral cortex is damaged depends on the location of the damage, according to The University of Washington. As the largest part of the brain, the cerebral cortex is composed of the frontal, parietal, occipital and temporal lobes. Damage to each of these lobes produces different symptoms.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • Can HIV Be Detected With a CBC Test?

    Q: Can HIV Be Detected With a CBC Test?

    A: HIV cannot be detected with a CBC test. To confirm the presence of HIV antibodies in the blood, a person must have the HIV Western blot and HIV ELISA tests, according to MedlinePlus.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under: