Conditions & Diseases

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Leech therapy is the medicinal use of leeches to treat disease and reattach or transplant limbs. Leech therapy is advocated in a number of treatment processes as the worms contain compounds and enzymes in their saliva that have an anti-coagulating effect on the blood and anti-inflammatory, bacteriostatic, vasodilating properties, notes Mehdi Leech Therapist.

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  • How do you get diabetes?

    Q: How do you get diabetes?

    A: A person can get diabetes through a compromised immune system, genetic precondition, environmental factors, cell-resistance to insulin and obesity, according to Mayo Clinic. Type 1 and type 2 diabetes can occur when the pancreas is not able to produce a sufficient amount of insulin, resulting in sugar accumulation in the blood.
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  • What happens to your body when you overdose?

    Q: What happens to your body when you overdose?

    A: A number of negative mental and physical reactions happen to the body as a result of a drug overdose. Symptoms often associated with a drug overdose include agitation, breathing difficulties, drowsiness, hallucinations, paranoia, nausea, tremors and convulsions, notes MedlinePlus. The type of symptoms experienced depends on the drug taken.
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  • How do you treat an ear infection?

    Q: How do you treat an ear infection?

    A: The best treatment for an ear infection depends on whether the infection is caused by a virus or bacterial organism. Antibiotics do not kill viruses, so they are only used to treat infections caused by bacteria. The only way to treat a viral ear infection is to treat the symptoms, according to WebMD.
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  • What causes arthritis?

    Q: What causes arthritis?

    A: MedlinePlus cites normal wear and tear on bone joints, viral or bacterial infections, injuries and autoimmune diseases as common causes of arthritis. Osteoarthritis is the most common type, and it is caused by joint wear and tear and advanced age.
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  • How do you get HIV?

    Q: How do you get HIV?

    A: A person can get HIV through sexual intercourse, blood transfusions, needle sharing, breast-feeding or pregnancy, according to Mayo Clinic. A person cannot get HIV through kissing or touching.
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  • How does kidney dialysis work?

    Q: How does kidney dialysis work?

    A: According to the National Kidney Foundation, kidney dialysis works by removing waste, salt and extra water from the body in the event that one's kidneys have failed. Kidney dialysis also helps to keep a safe level of certain chemicals in the blood as well as helping to control one's blood pressure.
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  • Why is there protein in my urine?

    Q: Why is there protein in my urine?

    A: In healthy people, fever, emotional stress and intense exercise can temporarily increase protein levels in the urine, according to the American Association for Clinical Chemistry. Abnormal protein levels may also point to kidney damage due to diabetes and hypertension.
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  • How do you know if you have diabetes?

    Q: How do you know if you have diabetes?

    A: According to the American Diabetes Association, the only way for a person to know if he has diabetes is to be tested; however, several common symptoms can indicate that a visit to the doctor is needed. These symptoms include frequent urination; feeling thirsty or hungry, especially after having already eaten; fatigue; blurred vision or cuts and bruises that are slow to heal.
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  • What are sleep doctors called?

    Q: What are sleep doctors called?

    A: According to the Mayo Clinic, the field of medicine related to sleep is known as polysomnography. As HealthCommunities.com explains, a doctor with education and training in the field of sleep medicine is known colloquially as a sleep specialist.
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  • What is an example of an asthma action plan?

    Q: What is an example of an asthma action plan?

    A: An asthma action or asthma attack plan from the doctor gives instructions for an individual patient, according to WebMD. It includes a list of the person's triggers, peak flow meter readings, the patient's usual symptoms, name and dosage of the daily medication, name and dosage of emergency medications, emergency telephone numbers, and instructions about contacting the doctor.
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  • Can you get rabies from a cat scratch?

    Q: Can you get rabies from a cat scratch?

    A: According to VCA Animal Hospitals, it is possible to contract rabies or another illness through cat scratches. The only way to determine if an aggressive cat has rabies is to quarantine the animal or take a brain tissue sample.
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  • Can Plan B cause infertility?

    Q: Can Plan B cause infertility?

    A: There is no evidence that using Plan B once or multiple times causes infertility, according to Bedsider. This source also states that the greatest risk when using Plan B is unintended pregnancy as the pill is only effective in preventing seven out of eight pregnancies. Plan B is an emergency contraception pill that works by delaying ovulation so that the sperm and egg never have the opportunity to meet, Bedsider states.
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  • What is Bell's palsy?

    Q: What is Bell's palsy?

    A: According to Mayo Clinic, Bell's palsy refers to sudden paralysis or weakness of facial muscles, making one side of the face look like it is drooping. Smiles become one-sided, with the eye of the affected side having resistance to closing. Bell's palsy may also be referred to as facial palsy.
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  • What is walking pneumonia?

    Q: What is walking pneumonia?

    A: Walking pneumonia, also called atypical pneumonia, is a milder form of pneumonia that does not usually require hospitalization, according to WebMD. Pneumonia in general is caused by bacteria, viruses, fungi, chemicals and inhaled food. Specifically, walking pneumonia is usually caused by a bacterial infection of the lung called Mycoplasma pneumoniae, which is most common in people under age 40.
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  • How do you cure arthritis?

    Q: How do you cure arthritis?

    A: Health.com notes that while a cure for arthritis has yet to be developed, the pain and discomfort associated with arthritis can be alleviated by losing weight and exercising. Acupuncture and capsaicin cream can also be beneficial.
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  • What causes stomach cramps while running?

    Q: What causes stomach cramps while running?

    A: Shallow breathing is a frequent cause of stomach cramps that occur while running, says Jeff Galloway, a 1972 Olympian. Consuming too much food or fluid contributes to shallow breathing. Low levels of sodium, potassium and calcium also lead to stomach cramps.
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  • Are all viruses contagious?

    Q: Are all viruses contagious?

    A: Microbe World explains that all viruses are infectious by their nature, but not all viruses are infectious to humans. A virus requires a living host cell in order to reproduce, but most viruses are specialized to infect only certain types of cells.
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  • Why do my knees hurt when I bend them?

    Q: Why do my knees hurt when I bend them?

    A: WebMD explains that pain that occurs when bending the knees is a common symptom of bursitis, a condition in which the sac of fluid that protects the knee joints becomes inflamed and irritated due to repeated bending, injury or overuse. Bursitis that is caused by kneeling is often referred to as "housemaid's knee" or "preacher's knee."
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  • What are some interesting facts about progeria?

    Q: What are some interesting facts about progeria?

    A: Progeria is an extremely rare genetic disease that exposes itself during the first year of a child's life, according to the National Institutes of Health (NIH). It is characterized by baldness, aged-looking skin, a pinched nose and a small face and jaw relative to head size. Children with progeria live to be only 13 years old on average. Death usually occurs as a result of heart attack or stroke.
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  • What is life expectancy for COPD sufferers?

    Q: What is life expectancy for COPD sufferers?

    A: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or COPD, symptoms typically appear later in life. It is difficult for medical researchers to determine the exact effect the condition has on reducing life expectancy, notes Cleveland Clinic.
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  • What causes pressure sores?

    Q: What causes pressure sores?

    A: Pressure sores are caused by constant pressure on the skin, which is often associated with prolonged immobility and improper care. These sores, which are also called bedsores, often occur on bony parts of the body, such as the tailbone, hips and ankles, according to MayoClinic.
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