Conditions & Diseases

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People are often reluctant to discuss their personal clinical depression because they think it will go away on its own, because they are embarrassed or because they simply want to avoid a painful subject. Sometimes they want to avoid having to take medication for the problem, or they may perceive the depression as something that comes and goes and therefore doesn't need treatment.

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  • Why do you use a cane on the opposite side of an injured leg?

    Q: Why do you use a cane on the opposite side of an injured leg?

    A: Mayo Clinic explains that when a cane is used for extra support because of a leg injury or disability, it is held by the hand opposite the injury to move along with the injured leg for extra support. The cane is lifted at the same time as the affected leg when the stronger leg is firmly on the ground.
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  • What does a blood clot in the leg feel like?

    Q: What does a blood clot in the leg feel like?

    A: A blood clot in the leg, known as deep vein thrombosis or DVT, makes the leg tender, painful and swollen. It can be hard to walk around on the leg if the blood clot has damaged the vessel's valves, according to WebMD. The leg may be warm to the touch or discolored. DVT can also have no symptoms at all, according to the Indiana Hemophilia and Thrombosis Treatment Center.
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  • What does salmonella do to the human body?

    Q: What does salmonella do to the human body?

    A: When salmonella infects the body, it usually affects the intestines and causes fever, vomiting and other symptoms, says KidsHealth. These symptoms often resolve without medical treatment.
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  • Are throat polyps serious?

    Q: Are throat polyps serious?

    A: According to the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, throat polyps are not malignant but can cause serious problems, especially if the voice is important to the patient’s career. Polyps are soft growths that develop on the vocal cords, causing hoarseness and other vocal problems as well as throat pain.
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  • How does kidney dialysis work?

    Q: How does kidney dialysis work?

    A: According to the National Kidney Foundation, kidney dialysis works by removing waste, salt and extra water from the body in the event that one's kidneys have failed. Kidney dialysis also helps to keep a safe level of certain chemicals in the blood as well as helping to control one's blood pressure.
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  • How long can HIV survive outside the human body?

    Q: How long can HIV survive outside the human body?

    A: HIV is capable of surviving outside the human body for a period of several weeks in certain conditions, according to NAM AIDSmap. The body fluid in question and the quantity of the virus contained in the fluid affect the survival period, as does temperature and acidity.
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  • What kind of doctor treats gout?

    Q: What kind of doctor treats gout?

    A: The American College of Rheumatology states that a rheumatologist treats gout. While other doctors can diagnose the condition, a rheumatologist is the specialist trained to treat gout.
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  • What causes blood blisters?

    Q: What causes blood blisters?

    A: WebMD indicates that blood blisters occur when the skin is pinched in a forceful manner and blood vessels are damaged in the process. A common injury that is known to create blood blisters is pinching a finger in a drawer. WebMD advises that if a blood blister occurs with additional signs of illness, such as fever or chills, it is important to consult with a medical professional.
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  • Can I fly with pneumonia?

    Q: Can I fly with pneumonia?

    A: Patient.co.uk recommends that a person with pneumonia be clinically recovered and no longer infectious before flying. A doctor can advise whether a patient is fit enough to fly.
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  • How can a damaged cuticle be healed?

    Q: How can a damaged cuticle be healed?

    A: Most damaged cuticles can be healed by protecting the skin from further damage and keeping it continuously moisturized with a thick moisturizer that is intended for the skin. Cuticles are strong pieces of skin that are intended to protect the nail bed and are somewhat difficult to damage, especially when they are cared for properly.
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  • What is a natural thyroid treatment?

    Q: What is a natural thyroid treatment?

    A: A natural approach to treating an under-active thyroid, or hypothyroidism, may include naturally-derived hormone replacements, supplements, changing the diet, exercise and traditional Chinese medicine. Dried and powdered pig thyroids can be used in place of synthetically created replacement hormones, according to WebMD. Dr. Oz recommends eating plenty of foods that are high in iodine, which the thyroid needs to function properly, such as milk, eggs, low-fat cheese, seaweed and shellfish.
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  • Can a stroke kill you?

    Q: Can a stroke kill you?

    A: According to the MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia, people can die from having a stroke. People who have ischemic strokes, which are those strokes that result from blood clots, are more likely to survive the stroke than people who have hemorrhagic strokes, or those strokes that result from bleeding in the brain.
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  • How is water lost from the body?

    Q: How is water lost from the body?

    A: Water is lost from the body when a person urinates, defecates, sweats and breathes, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or CDC. The average adult loses two to three liters of water every day, with one to two liters lost as urine, 100 to 200 milliliters lost as feces, 300 to 500 milliliters lost through breath and about one-half lifter lost through sweat, according to TheNutritionDr.
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  • What are the symptoms of too much blood loss?

    Q: What are the symptoms of too much blood loss?

    A: Excessive blood loss in the short term is characterized by hypovolemic shock and is potentially fatal. According to the New York Times, hypovolemic shock can be caused by trauma, such as cuts and burns, in addition to diarrhea or profuse sweating.
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  • What happens if the cerebral cortex is damaged?

    Q: What happens if the cerebral cortex is damaged?

    A: What happens when the cerebral cortex is damaged depends on the location of the damage, according to The University of Washington. As the largest part of the brain, the cerebral cortex is composed of the frontal, parietal, occipital and temporal lobes. Damage to each of these lobes produces different symptoms.
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  • What is the life expectancy for a someone with Turner's syndrome?

    Q: What is the life expectancy for a someone with Turner's syndrome?

    A: According to SyndromesPedia, those with Turner's syndrome have a typical reduction of life expectancy of 13 years. Most women with the condition live until 50 years of age.
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  • What are the dangers and symptoms of Ebola?

    Q: What are the dangers and symptoms of Ebola?

    A: Ebola is a very dangerous viral infection that can produce symptoms, such as fever and muscle pain. Other symptoms of Ebola include weakness, diarrhea, vomiting, headache and loss of appetite.
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  • Why is my face always red?

    Q: Why is my face always red?

    A: Rosacea is a possible reason that a person's face is always red, according to the NetDoctor medical team. It is a chronic skin condition that causes the nose and cheeks to become unusually red and mostly affects women.
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  • What causes kidney infections?

    Q: What causes kidney infections?

    A: According to Mayo Clinic, kidney infections usually occur when bacteria enter the kidneys via the urinary tract or the bloodstream and multiply. In rare instances, kidney infections can develop as a complication of kidney surgery.
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  • What are the causes of spinal meningitis?

    Q: What are the causes of spinal meningitis?

    A: The Mayo Clinic states that viruses and bacteria cause most cases of spinal meningitis. In rare cases, fungi, chemical reactions, inflammatory diseases, cancer and drug allergies cause the condition.
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  • How do you fix a pinched nerve in the shoulder?

    Q: How do you fix a pinched nerve in the shoulder?

    A: Treatment for a pinched nerve in the shoulder varies considerably based on severity, but it often includes rest, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, oral corticosteroids, steroid injections, narcotics, physical therapy, wearing a splint or surgery, according to WebMD.
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