Childbirth

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According to Babble, when a pregnant woman is dilating, the cervix opens; as it continues to open, the woman is able to penetrate the area rather easily with her fingers. The cervix is compared to soft, puckered lips. A woman can sit on a toilet and place one leg up to reach the cervix. While reaching into a dilated cervix, it's not uncommon to feel the baby's head.

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  • What do you pack for a baby delivery?

    Q: What do you pack for a baby delivery?

    A: Baby Center recommends bringing enough supplies for a two- to three-day stay at the hospital when delivering a baby. Supplies for both the baby and the mother are necessary.
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  • How do you recover faster from a C-section?

    Q: How do you recover faster from a C-section?

    A: Women can take from four to six weeks to recover completely from a C-section, but they can speed up the recovery process by resting, avoiding heavy lifting, supporting the abdomen, taking painkillers as recommended and staying hydrated. WebMD advises against driving for two weeks, exercising for four to six weeks and having sex for six weeks.
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  • When does a baby head to the birth canal?

    Q: When does a baby head to the birth canal?

    A: Babies go toward the birth canal shortly before birth, which should be around a woman's due date, according to Women's Health. It's hard to say exactly when this will take place, but there are some signs that show labor is approaching.
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  • What is the highest amount of babies born in a single birth?

    Q: What is the highest amount of babies born in a single birth?

    A: An Australian woman gave birth to nine babies in 1971, but only six of the babies survived, according to CNN.com. This birth is documented in the Guinness Book of World Records.
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  • Can twins be born on different days?

    Q: Can twins be born on different days?

    A: Twins can be born on different days, and it happens quite often. The phenomenon of one twin being born on one day and the other on the next day is generally the result of one child being born a few minutes before midnight with the sibling following minutes later — for instance, one baby is born at 11:58 p.m. and another is born at 12:01 a.m.
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  • How many babies are born every second?

    Q: How many babies are born every second?

    A: On average, 4.5 babies are born per second across the world, based on information from August 2014. That is equal to 273 babies born per minute, according to the Population Reference Bureau. The large majority of those births happen in lesser developed countries, where 4.1 births occur per second.
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  • How can I tell if I'm dilating?

    Q: How can I tell if I'm dilating?

    A: According to Babble, when a pregnant woman is dilating, the cervix opens; as it continues to open, the woman is able to penetrate the area rather easily with her fingers. The cervix is compared to soft, puckered lips. A woman can sit on a toilet and place one leg up to reach the cervix. While reaching into a dilated cervix, it's not uncommon to feel the baby's head.
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  • How can a father help in the delivery room?

    Q: How can a father help in the delivery room?

    A: A father can help in the delivery room by keeping the child's mother comfortable by rubbing her feet or back, providing her with ice chips and coaching her through hard contractions. Fathers can also help control who enters the birthing room and hold the mother's hand throughout the delivery process.
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  • Can newborn babies breathe underwater?

    Q: Can newborn babies breathe underwater?

    A: According to the Argonne National Laboratory's Ask a Scientist site, newborn babies are not able to breathe underwater. Immediately after birth, they are still connected to their mothers and receive oxygen through their umbilical cords.
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  • What will happen if my baby is born at 35 weeks?

    Q: What will happen if my baby is born at 35 weeks?

    A: Babies born at 35 weeks are at risk for many of the same complications as earlier preterm babies, according to Time magazine. Late preterm infants (between 34 and 37 weeks gestation) are more likely to have breathing problems, including respiratory distress syndrome and pneumonia. The American Pregnancy Association states that late preterm babies may also have a greater risk for jaundice, an inability to maintain body heat, digestive problems and anemia.
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  • What is a person who delivers babies called?

    Q: What is a person who delivers babies called?

    A: A doctor who delivers babies is called an obstetrician, according to the Encyclopaedia Britannica. Obstetrics is the medical specialty of caring for pregnant women. Before the 17th century, female midwives were responsible for delivering obstetrical care. By the 19th century, the field was well-established as a medical discipline.
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  • Q: Why does the ductus arteriosus close off at birth?

    A: The ductus arteriosus closes off after birth so that blood can flow properly through the heart and the lungs, according to the Cleveland Clinic. While in utero, a baby's ductus arteriosus connects the pulmonary artery to the aorta so that blood is shunted from the developing lungs of the fetus.
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  • Q: How long can a baby survive after the mother's water breaks?

    A: NBC News states that a baby can generally survive in the womb for up to 24 hours without risking infection after the mother's water breaks. However, the Daily Mail reports a case in which a woman's water broke prematurely at 16 weeks, and yet the baby survived and was carried to term.
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  • Q: How soon does labor begin after passing the mucus plug?

    A: Labor generally begins within 2 weeks after passing them mucus plug, as reported by WebMD. For some women, the amniotic sac ruptures soon after passing the mucus plug, indicating labor in most cases.
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  • When do girls become capable of giving birth?

    Q: When do girls become capable of giving birth?

    A: Girls become physically capable of giving birth after they are able to conceive, which is usually around the age of 12, according to WebMD. The first menstruation marks when a girl begins to release eggs and is able to conceive a child.
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  • What are some reasons for recording a child birth?

    Q: What are some reasons for recording a child birth?

    A: A good reason to record childbirth is to share the experience with friends and family, according to Families.com. There is limited space in a delivery room, but with the video tape, family can experience the birth on video.
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  • Q: What are the advantages and disadvantages of the Leboyer Method?

    A: The advantages of the Leboyer method include a soft delivery that allows the father’s participation, avoidance of pulling the baby's head, improved mother-to-child bonding, and reduced stress and trauma for the baby. The disadvantages include unsuitability for complicated deliveries, too much pain during delivery, and a longer recovery time for the mother.
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  • Q: What does 90 effaced mean?

    A: According to WebMD, when a woman's cervix is 90 percent effaced, it has stretched out almost as much as possible in preparation for giving birth. The cervix, the lower section of the uterus, must become thinner shortly before the baby comes.
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  • Q: What is HELLP syndrome?

    A: HELLP syndrome is a life-threatening condition that occurs when pregnant women have elevated levels of liver enzymes combined with a low platelet count, explains the Preeclampsia Foundation. Doctors typically view the syndrome, which usually appears late in the woman's pregnancy, as a form of preeclampsia.
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  • Q: Do nurse practitioners deliver babies?

    A: Nurse practitioners are trained to deliver babies as well as other responsibilities, but generally they do not do so unless they are also a midwife. If a woman chooses to deliver in a hospital, the obstetrician or doctor on duty delivers the baby.
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  • Q: What are the benefits of cord blood banking?

    A: Some patients, especially children and smaller adults, with certain diseases including leukemia, lymphoma and sickle cell anemia, can be injected with the cells found in cord blood to help boost their body's production of new, healthy cells, according to WebMD. The cells found in cord blood can also help people recover from certain cancer therapies, such as chemotherapy or radiation.
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