Cardiac Health

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According to The Dr. Oz Show, a person can reduce artery plaque if he stops consuming the foods that caused the plaque to develop and incorporates an abundance of heart-healthy foods into his diet. Foods high in saturated fats, trans fats and cholesterol, such as fast foods and processed meats, cause plaque buildup and should be eliminated. A heart-healthy diet is primarily plant based and contains little fat.

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  • What are signs of heart disease in women?

    Q: What are signs of heart disease in women?

    A: According to WebMD, common heart disease symptoms in women are chest discomfort, pain in the arms, neck or jaw, fatigue, sweating, stomach pain, nausea, lightheadedness and shortness of breath. Additional symptoms, noted by Cleveland Clinic, are anxiety, indigestion and sleep disturbances.
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  • Can you have a heart attack and not know it?

    Q: Can you have a heart attack and not know it?

    A: A person can have a heart attack and not know it because not all heart attacks produce recognizable symptoms, according to the American Heart Association. These are known as silent heart attacks.
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  • What are the signs of a heart attack?

    Q: What are the signs of a heart attack?

    A: The most characteristic symptom of a heart attack, according to the American Heart Association, is a severe, crushing pain in the chest that may radiate outward to the shoulders, arms and neck. Heart attacks can also cause the victim to feel short of breath or panicky and might induce dizziness and a cold, clammy sweat.
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  • What is an anterior infarction?

    Q: What is an anterior infarction?

    A: LearntheHeart.com states that an anterior myocardial infarction is when the anterior, or front, wall of the heart experiences injury due to lack of blood flow. An artery known as the left anterior descending coronary artery usually supplies blood flow to this area of the heart. An anterior myocardial infarction generally indicates that there is a blockage in this artery.
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  • What is a health cholesterol level?

    Q: What is a health cholesterol level?

    A: A healthy serum cholesterol level is 200 milligrams per deciliter or below, according to Mayo Clinic. Readings of 200 to 239 mg/dL are considered borderline high, while readings of 240 mg/dL are classified as high. Keeping cholesterol levels within healthy limits reduces an individual's risk of developing heart disease.
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  • Which arm goes numb during a heart attack?

    Q: Which arm goes numb during a heart attack?

    A: Either arm can go numb during a heart attack, but it is more frequently the left arm. Numbness alone is not a sign of a heart attack and can be caused by a number of other conditions.
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  • What is the ideal pulse rate?

    Q: What is the ideal pulse rate?

    A: According to the Mayo Clinic, the ideal resting heart rate for a healthy adult is between 60 and 100 beats per minute. More athletic people have a more efficient heart and a lower heart rate, with some high-level athletes exhibiting a heart rate of 40 beats per minute.
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  • What causes a fast heart rate?

    Q: What causes a fast heart rate?

    A: According to the American Heart Association, a heart rate of over 100 beats per minute is also referred to as tachycardia and occurs when the heart's electrical signals interfere with the sinoatrial node that is responsible for maintaining a balanced heart rate. Rapid heart rates can be triggered by anxiety, caffeine consumption, excessive alcohol consumption and smoking.
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  • What is a heart tremor?

    Q: What is a heart tremor?

    A: According to the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, a heart tremor, more commonly known as a heart murmur, is when the heart makes an abnormal sound during a physical exam. A murmur is often described by doctors as a whooshing or swishing sound. WebMD reports the majority of murmurs are considered innocent, and an abnormal murmur may be a sign the heart has a damaged valve or other abnormality.
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  • Can you reduce plaque in your arteries?

    Q: Can you reduce plaque in your arteries?

    A: According to The Dr. Oz Show, a person can reduce artery plaque if he stops consuming the foods that caused the plaque to develop and incorporates an abundance of heart-healthy foods into his diet. Foods high in saturated fats, trans fats and cholesterol, such as fast foods and processed meats, cause plaque buildup and should be eliminated. A heart-healthy diet is primarily plant based and contains little fat.
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  • How is a pacemaker implanted?

    Q: How is a pacemaker implanted?

    A: During pacemaker implantation, a local anesthetic is given to numb the upper chest, and an incision is made, states Cleveland Clinic. The pacemaker leads are guided through a vein and into the heart, where they attach to the heart muscle. The other end of each lead connects to the pacemaker generator.
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  • What is a silent heart attack?

    Q: What is a silent heart attack?

    A: A silent heart attack is a heart attack that has no symptoms, according to the American Heart Association. It also sometimes refers to a heart attack with minimal or unrecognized symptoms. In any of these three cases, the person having a heart attack does not realize it.
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  • What are the symptoms of high blood pressure?

    Q: What are the symptoms of high blood pressure?

    A: The majority of those afflicted by high blood pressure, which is also called hypertension, experience no symptoms at all, even when blood pressure reaches dangerous levels. Those who do experience symptoms may have chest pain, fatigue, confusion, irregular heartbeat, difficulty breathing, dizzy spells, dull headaches and nosebleeds. Pounding in the ears, neck or chest may also occur, according to WebMD.
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  • How can you keep your circulatory system healthy?

    Q: How can you keep your circulatory system healthy?

    A: To keep the circulatory system healthy, it is important to exercise on a regular basis, eat a healthy diet and avoid smoking. It helps to keep the body active by doing exercises, such as walking, jogging, running, biking, skating, jumping and swimming. Additionally, it is crucial to reduce consumption of junk and oily foods.
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  • What causes an irregular heartbeat?

    Q: What causes an irregular heartbeat?

    A: There are a number causes of an irregular heartbeat, including eating disorders, bulimia nervosa, atrial fibrillation, thyrotoxicosis, mitral valve prolapse and heart problems, according to Right Diagnosis. Uncommon causes include sickle cell anemia, scleroderma and chronic fatigue syndrome.
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  • What is a heart stent?

    Q: What is a heart stent?

    A: A heart stent is a small tube used to treat narrowed arteries or strengthen weakened arteries, as defined by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute. Stent manufacturers use metal mesh or fabric to produce these tubes.
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  • What is a heart murmur?

    Q: What is a heart murmur?

    A: A heart murmur is an unusual, extra or loud sound heard by a doctor when he listens to the heart with a stethoscope. Heart murmurs are categorized as innocent, such as sounds frequently heard in children, or abnormal, which can indicate an underlying problem, according to the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.
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  • How do you prevent heart disease?

    Q: How do you prevent heart disease?

    A: Anyone of any age can prevent heart disease by adopting a healthy eating and diet plan early, according to the American Heart Association. That means choosing foods that are low in cholesterol, salt, sugar and bad fats, such as saturated fats and trans fats. Eating a wide variety of fruits and vegetables along with good protein sources, such as nuts and lean meats, is also important.
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  • How many people die of obesity each year?

    Q: How many people die of obesity each year?

    A: As of March 2014, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that 112,000 deaths in the United States are associated with obesity annually. It is important to note that as Americans focus on exercising and eating healthy, combined with the advancements in medical science and national promotions that support reducing obesity, this estimate is likely to fluctuate, according to the CDC.
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  • When would cardiac output be the greatest?

    Q: When would cardiac output be the greatest?

    A: According to WebMD, cardiac output is greatest during intense exercise and when a person is approximately in his 20s. The more intense the exercise, the more blood the body's muscle demand from the heart and, therefore, the cardiac output is normally greater than at rest.
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  • What is aortic atherosclerosis?

    Q: What is aortic atherosclerosis?

    A: Aortic atherosclerosis is the hardening of the aortic artery that occurs when plaque, a substance made of cholesterol, fats and cellular waste, builds up inside the arteries, partially or completely blocking the flow of blood. According to the American Heart Association, atherosclerosis is a progressive disease that may begin in childhood and often does not become a real danger until individuals reach their 50s or 60s.
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