Cancer

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Symptoms of prostate cancer include trouble urinating, decreased strength in the urine stream, blood in the urine or semen, general pain in the back and lower body, including the pelvic region, bone pain and erectile dysfunction, according to the Mayo Clinic. WebMD also lists the leaking of urine when laughing or coughing and the inability to urinate while standing up as additional symptoms.

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  • What is the prognosis for prostate cancer?

    Q: What is the prognosis for prostate cancer?

    A: The prognosis for prostate cancer depends on how far the cancer has spread once the doctor detects the disease, according to WebMD. Doctors use one of four stages to describe how advanced prostate cancer has become in a patient. Stage I has the best prognosis, and Stage IV has the worst. Better prognoses depend on the location of prostate cancer.
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  • What is the life expectancy for people with leukemia?

    Q: What is the life expectancy for people with leukemia?

    A: Studies from the National Cancer Institute place the average life expectancy for people with leukemia at 72 years for men and 78 years for women. The National CML Society states that the life expectancy for those with leukemia is measured in decades, and even matches that of the general population.
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  • What are healthy foods for a diet for cancer patients?

    Q: What are healthy foods for a diet for cancer patients?

    A: According to The Scott Hamilton CARES Initiative, nutritious foods that are healthy for cancer patients to eat include fruits, vegetables, whole grains and foods rich in protein and omega 3 fatty acids. Low-fat dairy and alternative dairy foods are also good to eat. Beverages cancer patients may drink include water, tea, milk, coffee and 100 percent fruit juices.
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  • What is lymphoma cancer?

    Q: What is lymphoma cancer?

    A: According to MedlinePlus, lymphoma is a type of cancer that affects the lymphatic system, a key part of the immune system. There are numerous different types of lymphoma, but the majority of lymphomas are classified as non-Hodgkin lymphomas.
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  • What does "heterogeneously dense breast tissue" mean?

    Q: What does "heterogeneously dense breast tissue" mean?

    A: During a mammogram, a medical technician may discover that a patient has heterogeneously dense breasts. This medical term refers to extremely dense glandular tissue in the breast area. Dr. Margaret Polaneczky explains that, under this classification, the breast composition measures between 51 - 75 percent glandular. Large amounts of breast tissue compromise a mammogram test, and make it difficult to detect cancer, according to breast cancer expert, Dr. Stacey Vitiello.
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  • What is a doctor called who studies the brain?

    Q: What is a doctor called who studies the brain?

    A: A neurologist studies the nervous system, which is composed of the brain, the spinal cord and the peripheral nervous system. This includes any part of the body, such as the eyes, ears and skin, that receive information through the senses.
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  • What is metastatic cancer?

    Q: What is metastatic cancer?

    A: Metastatic cancer is a type of cancer that has spread from the original point of cancer to another place in the body, according to the National Cancer Institute at the National Institutes of Health. Metastasis occurs when cancer cells spread to other parts of the body and form cancerous tumors.
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  • What are the symptoms of leukemia in children?

    Q: What are the symptoms of leukemia in children?

    A: Common symptoms of leukemia in children include fatigue or pale skin, infections and fever, easy bleeding or bruising, extreme weakness, shortness of breath, and coughing, according to WebMD. Other symptoms may include bone or joint pain, swelling in the abdomen, swelling above the collarbone, loss of appetite, weight loss, headaches, seizure, balance problems or abnormal vision.
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  • What can be expected in the final stages of lung cancer?

    Q: What can be expected in the final stages of lung cancer?

    A: According to the National Cancer Institute, during the final stages of lung cancer, a patient suffers myoclonus, dyspnea, fatigue, cough, rattle, delirium and fever. A study of 200 cancer patients revealed that noisy breathing, pain and urinary dysfunction were the most frequent symptoms during the last 48 hours of life.
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  • What are pre-cancerous cells?

    Q: What are pre-cancerous cells?

    A: Precancerous cells, also called premalignant cells, are abnormal cells that have the potential to become cancerous, according to About.com. A precancerous cell is not destined to progress to cancer and can even return to a normal cell in the future.
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  • What are the effects of radiation therapy?

    Q: What are the effects of radiation therapy?

    A: The American Cancer Society notes that fatigue is a common side effect of radiation treatment. Fatigue is defined as feeling tired all the time, even after resting. A number of factors can lead to fatigue, including low red blood cell count, pain, poor nutrition, stress and chemotherapy drugs.
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  • What is the worst type of cancer?

    Q: What is the worst type of cancer?

    A: Although lung cancer kills more people each year, pancreatic cancer is considered the deadliest type of cancer based on its general prognosis. Only five percent of people diagnosed with pancreatic cancer live as long as five years following their diagnosis.
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  • Is lymphoma curable?

    Q: Is lymphoma curable?

    A: Lymphoma is both treatable and curable, depending on the specific stage and cancer type, according to the American Society of Hematology. Lymphoma is divided into two categories, Hodgkin lymphoma and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Hodgkin lymphoma is highly curable.
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  • What is a PET scan?

    Q: What is a PET scan?

    A: According to Mayo Clinic, a PET scan is an imaging test that helps determine how tissues and organs in the body are functioning. Short for positron emission topography, a PET scan uses a radioactive drug tracer to show areas of the body that have unusually high levels of chemical activity, which typically relates to a disease or disorder. These areas show up as bright spots on a PET scan.
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  • What are some warning signs of cancer?

    Q: What are some warning signs of cancer?

    A: According to the American Cancer Society, generalized signs and symptoms of cancer include unexplained weight loss, fever, fatigue, unexplained pain, skin changes, changes in bowel or bladder functions, wounds that do not heal, unusual bleeding and white patches inside the mouth. All of these signs and symptoms can point to a diagnosis of cancer if they are experienced for prolonged periods of time.
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  • Is lung cancer curable?

    Q: Is lung cancer curable?

    A: According to Cancer.org, the ability to treat or cure lung cancer depends on the stage of the cancer and numerous other factors. Treatment options vary according to the severity of the cancer.
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  • What is the difference between carcinoma and sarcoma?

    Q: What is the difference between carcinoma and sarcoma?

    A: Carcinoma cancers affect cell development in skin tissue and tissue-lined organs, such as kidneys, while sarcomas are found in bones, nerves, blood vessels and connective tissues, according to WebMD. Carcinoma triggers abnormal cell growth in some of the body's most essential organs and often spreads rapidly, so cases are frequently diagnosed. Sarcoma is very rare, and the most common form only causes approximately one out of 100 adult cancer cases.
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  • What are some symptoms of prostate cancer?

    Q: What are some symptoms of prostate cancer?

    A: Symptoms of prostate cancer include trouble urinating, decreased strength in the urine stream, blood in the urine or semen, general pain in the back and lower body, including the pelvic region, bone pain and erectile dysfunction, according to the Mayo Clinic. WebMD also lists the leaking of urine when laughing or coughing and the inability to urinate while standing up as additional symptoms.
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  • What is the relationship between mitosis and cancer?

    Q: What is the relationship between mitosis and cancer?

    A: Mitosis is the process via which cells divide, producing copies of themselves. Cancer is essentially mitosis that is out of control. Cancer cells do not operate in the same way as other cells in the system they occupy, so they replicate and damage surrounding tissues.
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  • How bad is stage 4 cancer?

    Q: How bad is stage 4 cancer?

    A: According to the Cancer Institute of New South Wales, stage 4 cancer is the most severe stage of cancer and indicates distant spread. At this stage, cancerous cells are able to travel the body via blood vessels, which enables them to spread to any body part.
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  • What is non-Hodgkin's lymphoma?

    Q: What is non-Hodgkin's lymphoma?

    A: Non-Hodgkin lymphoma is a form of cancer that starts in the lymphocytes, which are cells of the lymphatic system. Lymphocytes exist in the lymph nodes and other lymphoid tissues and are part of the body’s immune system, according to the American Cancer Society.
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