Birth Control

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The World Health Organization explains that the main advantage of family planning is that women and couples can avoid unwanted pregnancies, while the National Health Service warns that traditional family planning does not prevent against HIV or other sexually transmitted diseases. WHO advocates that with family planning, a woman can space out her pregnancies and limit her family size using different methods of contraceptives.

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  • What are the advantages and disadvantages of family planning?

    Q: What are the advantages and disadvantages of family planning?

    A: The World Health Organization explains that the main advantage of family planning is that women and couples can avoid unwanted pregnancies, while the National Health Service warns that traditional family planning does not prevent against HIV or other sexually transmitted diseases. WHO advocates that with family planning, a woman can space out her pregnancies and limit her family size using different methods of contraceptives.
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  • What are the chances of getting pregnant on NuvaRing?

    Q: What are the chances of getting pregnant on NuvaRing?

    A: The National Institutes of Health report that when NuvaRing is used according to directions from medical professionals, only .3 percent of women get pregnant per year. Nine percent of women get pregnant per year through typical use. This is statistically equal to or better than many other methods of birth control.
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  • What happens if I miss a Depo shot?

    Q: What happens if I miss a Depo shot?

    A: Once a Depo-Provera shot is missed, there is a possibility of pregnancy when having unprotected sex, according to the Indiana University Bloomington Health Center. It's necessary to have a Depo-Provera shot every 13 weeks for it to remain a viable method of birth control. If a woman misses a shot or receives it late, it is important to use a condom during each sexual encounter to prevent pregnancy.
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  • Does penicillin affect birth control?

    Q: Does penicillin affect birth control?

    A: Drugs.com states that penicillin sometimes makes birth control pills less effective, which may result in unexpected pregnancy. A backup method of birth control is recommended.
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  • Is there a pill I can take to delay my period?

    Q: Is there a pill I can take to delay my period?

    A: According to Boots WebMD, norethisterone is a prescription medication that can be taken to delay menstruation. Norethisterone is typically prescribed to females with irregular menstrual cycles, as it contains synthetic hormones that mimic female sex hormones and decrease the production of progestogen hormones.
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  • Why am I still bleeding if I am on the pill?

    Q: Why am I still bleeding if I am on the pill?

    A: Traditional birth control pills include a week of inactive pills; these cause the patient to undergo withdrawal bleeding, which looks much like a period, according to the Mayo Clinic. Spotting, or bleeding between periods, is also common, especially when someone is first on the pill.
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  • Q: How do you take the MTP kit?

    A: Ingest the first dose of a medical abortion pill at the doctor's office, and then take the second dosage at home within 48 hours of the first one, according to WebMD. A person may use this method to abort a fetus up to nine weeks into a pregnancy.
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  • Q: What are the side effects of tubal ligation?

    A: Some side effects that can follow a tubal ligation procedure include light vaginal bleeding and excessive gas within the first couple days, according to WebMD. Although tubal ligation is a birth control method, it is not 100 percent effective. In five out of 1,000 cases per year, a woman becomes pregnant within the first year following a tubal ligation; in five years, 13 out of 1,000 women become pregnant.
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  • Q: How do you stop breakthrough bleeding when on the birth control pill?

    A: Although there may not be a quick fix for breakthrough bleeding when taking birth control pills, it is recommended that patients contact a physician if the bleeding is heavy or persists for more than seven days, according to Mayo Clinic. Continue taking birth control pills as directed by a physician.
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  • Q: What is the effectiveness of Mirena?

    A: Mirena is over 99 percent effective for birth control, according to the Mirena website. Once a health care professional places the intrauterine device, it continuously prevents pregnancy for up to five years.
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  • Q: How does birth control work?

    A: Several types of birth control exist, all of which work by preventing the onset of pregnancy, which begins when a fertilized egg implants in the uterine lining. According to the U.S. Department of Health, different methods arrive at that goal in different ways, but most fall into one of these birth control categories: natural, barrier, hormonal, implantable or permanent.
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  • Q: What is the process for reverse sterilization with Essure removal?

    A: According to HealthGuidance.org, reversing Essure sterilization requires one of several microsurgical procedures. In one, called a tubouterine implantation, a doctor separates the healthy part of the fallopian tube from the uterus, removes the Essure coils from both sides of the uterus, opens the uterine wall and inserts the healthy portion of the fallopian tube into the opening.
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  • Q: Can the birth-control pill make you feel pregnant during the first month of taking it?

    A: According to Dr. Walter Kobasa, birth-control pills can make some women feel nauseated, which may resemble pregnancy symptoms. The nausea normally resolves before a woman finishes the first pack of pills.
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  • Q: How long does it take for birth control to leave your system?

    A: Birth control pills do not stay in a person's system for an extend period of time; they leave within a few days. Most women's periods resume within four weeks of stopping the pill, according to Mayo Clinic.
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  • Q: Where can you buy condoms?

    A: According to TeenHealthFX, condoms are available for purchase near the pharmacy counter of grocery and drug stores. Many vending machines in public men’s restrooms supply them. In addition, Columbia University points out that condoms are for sale at sexuality specialty shops and online stores and through mail-order catalogues.
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  • How effective is the morning-after pill?

    Q: How effective is the morning-after pill?

    A: According to WebMD, if the morning-after pill is taken within 24 hours after having sexual intercourse, then it is deemed to be 95 percent effective at preventing pregnancy. However, if the emergency contraceptive is taken between 24 and 72 hours after intercourse, the level of effectiveness drops to 89 percent.
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  • Q: Does emergency contraception delay your period?

    A: According to the U.S. National Library of Medicine, emergency contraception may alter a woman's menstrual cycle, including delaying her period. Changes in a woman's menstrual cycle is a normal side effect of emergency contraception.
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  • Q: What are the chances of getting pregnant on the pill?

    A: According to the Palo Alto Medical Foundation, the chances of a woman getting pregnant while she is on the pill are about 5 percent if she uses the pill typically, and about 0.1 percent if she follows the guidelines perfectly. Women must take birth control pills daily and as prescribed to best reduce their chances of pregnancy.
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  • Q: Can the Plan B pill make you skip your period a few months after taking it?

    A: According to WebMD, a woman can experience menstrual changes after taking Plan B. Most commonly, a Plan B user experiences lighter periods, heavier periods or irregular spotting for a few weeks after taking the drug.
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  • Q: What happens if I started taking birth control for less than a week and then stopped?

    A: Taking birth control for less than a week has little effect on the body and menstrual cycle. According to Military Obstetrics & Gynecology, birth control pills do not achieve their full effectiveness until after the first month of use. Many physicians and pill manufacturers suggest that birth control pills become effective after seven days of continuous use.
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  • What is an ovulation calculator?

    Q: What is an ovulation calculator?

    A: An ovulation calculator estimates a woman's fertile days in a month based on the dates of menstruation. The calculator estimates that ovulation occurs around day 14 of a 28-day cycle, explains WebMD. Ovulation may occur later or earlier, depending on the length of a woman's cycle.
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