Birth Control

A:

The World Health Organization explains that the main advantage of family planning is that women and couples can avoid unwanted pregnancies, while the National Health Service warns that traditional family planning does not prevent against HIV or other sexually transmitted diseases. WHO advocates that with family planning, a woman can space out her pregnancies and limit her family size using different methods of contraceptives.

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  • Does Penicillin Affect Birth Control?

    Q: Does Penicillin Affect Birth Control?

    A: Drugs.com states that penicillin sometimes makes birth control pills less effective, which may result in unexpected pregnancy. A backup method of birth control is recommended.
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  • Why Am I Still Bleeding If I Am on the Pill?

    Q: Why Am I Still Bleeding If I Am on the Pill?

    A: Traditional birth control pills include a week of inactive pills; these cause the patient to undergo withdrawal bleeding, which looks much like a period, according to the Mayo Clinic. Spotting, or bleeding between periods, is also common, especially when someone is first on the pill.
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  • What Happens If I Miss a Depo Shot?

    Q: What Happens If I Miss a Depo Shot?

    A: Once a Depo-Provera shot is missed, there is a possibility of pregnancy when having unprotected sex, according to the Indiana University Bloomington Health Center. It's necessary to have a Depo-Provera shot every 13 weeks for it to remain a viable method of birth control. If a woman misses a shot or receives it late, it is important to use a condom during each sexual encounter to prevent pregnancy.
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  • What Are the Advantages and Disadvantages of Family Planning?

    Q: What Are the Advantages and Disadvantages of Family Planning?

    A: The World Health Organization explains that the main advantage of family planning is that women and couples can avoid unwanted pregnancies, while the National Health Service warns that traditional family planning does not prevent against HIV or other sexually transmitted diseases. WHO advocates that with family planning, a woman can space out her pregnancies and limit her family size using different methods of contraceptives.
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  • What Are the Chances of Getting Pregnant on NuvaRing?

    Q: What Are the Chances of Getting Pregnant on NuvaRing?

    A: The National Institutes of Health report that when NuvaRing is used according to directions from medical professionals, only .3 percent of women get pregnant per year. Nine percent of women get pregnant per year through typical use. This is statistically equal to or better than many other methods of birth control.
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  • Is There a Pill I Can Take to Delay My Period?

    Q: Is There a Pill I Can Take to Delay My Period?

    A: According to Boots WebMD, norethisterone is a prescription medication that can be taken to delay menstruation. Norethisterone is typically prescribed to females with irregular menstrual cycles, as it contains synthetic hormones that mimic female sex hormones and decrease the production of progestogen hormones.
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  • Q: What Happens If You Stop Taking Birth Control and Then Start Taking It Again?

    A: Women who start taking birth control and then stop are more at risk for pregnancy due to the inconsistent nature of how hormones in the pill are administered, according to the Center for Young Women's Health. The pill, when taken once a day, is 99 percent effective in preventing pregnancy.
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  • Q: How Does Birth Control Work?

    A: Several types of birth control exist, all of which work by preventing the onset of pregnancy, which begins when a fertilized egg implants in the uterine lining. According to the U.S. Department of Health, different methods arrive at that goal in different ways, but most fall into one of these birth control categories: natural, barrier, hormonal, implantable or permanent.
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  • Q: What Is the Difference Between ParaGard and Mirena?

    A: The major difference between ParaGard and Mirena is that ParaGard is an IUD that does not have any hormones, according to Dr. Sara Kennedy. The makers of ParaGard say the IUD contains a small copper filament that interferes with fertilization and sperm movement, preventing pregnancy without releasing hormones.
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  • Q: What Are the Side Effects of Birth Control Implants?

    A: Some of the most commonly reported side effects of birth control implants include swelling, pain, scarring, infection and redness. These implants use a hormone called progesterone to prevent pregnancy, states Healthline. While implants are an effective birth control technique, they offer no protection against sexually transmitted diseases or infections.
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  • Q: Can the Birth-Control Pill Make You Feel Pregnant During the First Month of Taking It?

    A: According to Dr. Walter Kobasa, birth-control pills can make some women feel nauseated, which may resemble pregnancy symptoms. The nausea normally resolves before a woman finishes the first pack of pills.
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  • Q: What Is Artificial Family Planning?

    A: Artificial planning is the process of using artificial birth control to control the growth of a family by preventing unwanted pregnancy. Birth control is used when a couple does not feel that the time is right to have children for a number of reasons, including age or finances.
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  • Q: How Can Overpopulation Be Stopped?

    A: Overpopulation can be stopped by access to birth control, family planning education, economic opportunities, social norms and government regulations. While much debate occurs over the exact number that would equate to overpopulation, experts accept that there is some number of humans that would meet a definition of overpopulation.
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  • Q: What Happens When an IUD Falls Out?

    A: If an IUD falls out, pregnancy may occur. Even if the device becomes partially dislodged, a doctor needs to remove it and replace it with a new one.
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  • Q: What Are the Side Affects of the Depo Shot?

    A: The side effects of Depo-Provera include irregular menstruation, headaches and nervousness, according to WebMD. Other possible side effects are dizziness and depression. Some users also experience acne or changes in appetite.
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  • Q: What Was the Outcome of the Essure Lawsuit?

    A: As of 2015, five Essure lawsuits are still pending in the U.S. District Court, Eastern District of Pennsylvania, as detailed by the Southern Institute for Medical and Legal Affairs. Bayer HealthCare Pharmaceuticals, the owner of Essure since 2013, has asked that the claims be dismissed by the court.
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  • What Are Some Different Types of Birth Control?

    Q: What Are Some Different Types of Birth Control?

    A: Different types of birth control include barrier methods, such as male and female condoms and contraceptive sponges, and hormonal methods, such as birth control pills, vaginal rings and implantable rods. Intrauterine devices, or IUDs, are another birth control option, according to the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.
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  • Q: How Do You Terminate a Pregnancy at Home?

    A: According to Planned Parenthood, it is possible to end a pregnancy at home by having a medication abortion. This method relies on two different medications to terminate the pregnancy first and then cause the uterus to empty.
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  • Q: How Do You Take the MTP Kit?

    A: Ingest the first dose of a medical abortion pill at the doctor's office, and then take the second dosage at home within 48 hours of the first one, according to WebMD. A person may use this method to abort a fetus up to nine weeks into a pregnancy.
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  • Q: Does Amoxicillin Affect Birth Control Pills?

    A: Amoxicillin, a penicillin antibiotic that fights bacterial infection, can make birth control pills less effective, according to Drugs.com. If you are concerned about preventing pregnancy, talk to your doctor about alternative, reliable forms of birth control to use during a course of antibiotics.
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  • Q: How Does One Know If an IUD Has Come Out?

    A: It is usually unlikely for the IUD coil to come out, but if one is not feeling the threads, then it has moved, as stated by NHS. A doctor will teach a person how to feel the presence of the IUD coil during fitting it in place.
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