Birth Control

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The World Health Organization explains that the main advantage of family planning is that women and couples can avoid unwanted pregnancies, while the National Health Service warns that traditional family planning does not prevent against HIV or other sexually transmitted diseases. WHO advocates that with family planning, a woman can space out her pregnancies and limit her family size using different methods of contraceptives.

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  • Is there a pill I can take to delay my period?

    Q: Is there a pill I can take to delay my period?

    A: According to Boots WebMD, norethisterone is a prescription medication that can be taken to delay menstruation. Norethisterone is typically prescribed to females with irregular menstrual cycles, as it contains synthetic hormones that mimic female sex hormones and decrease the production of progestogen hormones.
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  • What happens if I miss a Depo shot?

    Q: What happens if I miss a Depo shot?

    A: Once a Depo-Provera shot is missed, there is a possibility of pregnancy when having unprotected sex, according to the Indiana University Bloomington Health Center. It's necessary to have a Depo-Provera shot every 13 weeks for it to remain a viable method of birth control. If a woman misses a shot or receives it late, it is important to use a condom during each sexual encounter to prevent pregnancy.
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  • Does penicillin affect birth control?

    Q: Does penicillin affect birth control?

    A: Drugs.com states that penicillin sometimes makes birth control pills less effective, which may result in unexpected pregnancy. A backup method of birth control is recommended.
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  • Why am I still bleeding if I am on the pill?

    Q: Why am I still bleeding if I am on the pill?

    A: Traditional birth control pills include a week of inactive pills; these cause the patient to undergo withdrawal bleeding, which looks much like a period, according to the Mayo Clinic. Spotting, or bleeding between periods, is also common, especially when someone is first on the pill.
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  • What are the chances of getting pregnant on NuvaRing?

    Q: What are the chances of getting pregnant on NuvaRing?

    A: The National Institutes of Health report that when NuvaRing is used according to directions from medical professionals, only .3 percent of women get pregnant per year. Nine percent of women get pregnant per year through typical use. This is statistically equal to or better than many other methods of birth control.
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  • What are the advantages and disadvantages of family planning?

    Q: What are the advantages and disadvantages of family planning?

    A: The World Health Organization explains that the main advantage of family planning is that women and couples can avoid unwanted pregnancies, while the National Health Service warns that traditional family planning does not prevent against HIV or other sexually transmitted diseases. WHO advocates that with family planning, a woman can space out her pregnancies and limit her family size using different methods of contraceptives.
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  • Q: Are there any safe days to avoid pregnancy?

    A: There is no guaranteed safe day to avoid pregnancy, but abstinence during ovulation can substantially reduce your chance of becoming pregnant. Use the rhythm method to recognize the days you are most fertile and do not engage in sex before and during those days to avoid pregnancy.
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  • Q: What is an artificial method of family planning?

    A: An artificial family planning method is any unnatural technique that is used to prevent conception. Artificial family planning methods include barrier methods: contraceptive sponge, diaphragm, cervical cap and cervical shield, and condoms; hormonal methods: vaginal ring, patch, injection and pills; implantable devices; and permanent sterilization, according to WomensHealth.gov.
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  • Q: What are the chances of getting pregnant on the pill?

    A: According to the Palo Alto Medical Foundation, the chances of a woman getting pregnant while she is on the pill are about 5 percent if she uses the pill typically, and about 0.1 percent if she follows the guidelines perfectly. Women must take birth control pills daily and as prescribed to best reduce their chances of pregnancy.
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  • Q: Can taking the Plan B pill stop your period once it has started?

    A: Although the Plan B pill can affect the timing of the next period after its use, it should not stop menstruation once it has started. This pill can cause menstrual flow issues at the next period after its use, states WebMD.
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  • Q: Why does "Plan B" cause spotting?

    A: The emergency contraception Plan B One-Step causes spotting because the levonorgestrel it contains may alter the lining of the uterus to prevent a fertilized egg from implanting, states WebMD. Plan B may also cause menstrual changes, prevent or delay ovulation and prevent an egg from becoming fertilized.
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  • Q: What is the process for reverse sterilization with Essure removal?

    A: According to HealthGuidance.org, reversing Essure sterilization requires one of several microsurgical procedures. In one, called a tubouterine implantation, a doctor separates the healthy part of the fallopian tube from the uterus, removes the Essure coils from both sides of the uterus, opens the uterine wall and inserts the healthy portion of the fallopian tube into the opening.
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  • Q: How do you stop bleeding on Depo-Provera?

    A: Estrogen replacement and tranexamic acid are two medications that may be helpful in stopping the bleeding caused from a Depo-Provera shot, according to About Health. When continuous bleeding occurs following a Depo-Provera shot, speak with a doctor to determine if these options are right for the situation.
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  • Q: Does emergency contraception delay your period?

    A: According to the U.S. National Library of Medicine, emergency contraception may alter a woman's menstrual cycle, including delaying her period. Changes in a woman's menstrual cycle is a normal side effect of emergency contraception.
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  • Q: How long does it take for Depo to leave your system after only one shot?

    A: It takes 12 weeks for Depo to leave the system after a single injection. It mainly breaks down in the liver, with its metabolites eliminated from the body through urine and feces, according to Pharmacia and Upjohn Company, a Pfizer subsidiary.
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  • Q: Where can I find a Next shop?

    A: You can find the Next shop nearest to you by visiting the Next website and clicking on "Store Locator," which allows you to search for locations around the world. You can also visit a Next shop online from 72 countries by clicking "Change" at the bottom of the page.
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  • Q: Can you get pregnant in the first month of the Depo-Provera shot?

    A: It is possible, though unlikely, to become pregnant during the first month of the Depo-Provera shot, explains Planned Parenthood. Depo-Provera must be given at a specific time based on personal health conditions. If the shot is not taken on schedule, risk of pregnancy increases.
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  • Q: What happens when stopping Depo-Provera?

    A: After stopping the use of Depo-Provera, women expect to resume menstruation within 1 to 3 months and their bones begin accumulating calcium again. Depo-Provera acts as a birth control, offering users options of receiving protection in the form of shots, which they inject every 11 weeks. While using Depo-Provera, bone growth slows and menstruation stops, a condition called amenorrhea, but these effects reverse within several months of the last shot.
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  • Q: What are the side effects of tubal ligation?

    A: Some side effects that can follow a tubal ligation procedure include light vaginal bleeding and excessive gas within the first couple days, according to WebMD. Although tubal ligation is a birth control method, it is not 100 percent effective. In five out of 1,000 cases per year, a woman becomes pregnant within the first year following a tubal ligation; in five years, 13 out of 1,000 women become pregnant.
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  • Q: How do you prevent spotting while on the pill?

    A: It may be possible to prevent spotting by taking the pill as the directions indicate each day at the same time, according to WebMD. Maintaining a healthy weight and managing stress with relaxation techniques may also help to prevent spotting. Stopping smoking can assist as well, reports Mayo Clinic.
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  • Q: What are the side effects caused by stopping NuvaRing?

    A: When a woman stops using NuvaRing, she may experience some side effects, such as nausea, vomiting, water retention, weight gain, painful menstrual periods, vaginal bleeding in between periods, ankle or feet swelling, bloating, tender breasts and headaches according to WebMD and NuvaRing's official site. There are other more serious problems that can occur during NuvaRing use or after stopping NuvaRing use including liver problems, gallbladder problems, angioedema and blood clots.
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