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What are some examples of physician's office patient survey questions?

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The types of questions that appear on a physician's office patient survey depend on the nature of the survey, with some surveys asking about general health and family medical history, while others ask for feedback on the doctor's performance and the experience at the practice. Medical surveys also commonly ask for personal details about the patient, whereas feedback surveys may be anonymous.

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Physician's offices typically employ health surveys to obtain information about new patients in order to create a record of past and current ailments and compile a history for the attending doctor. These surveys are commonly extensive in order to create a strong base of information for the internal records. They typically start with basic personal information, such as the patient's name, address, occupation and age. The survey also asks questions about lifestyle actions, such as the frequency and extent of exercise, if the patient smokes and how often the patient consumes alcohol. The survey may also ask about existing medical conditions, past hospitalizations and the prevalence of certain diseases among family members.

A patient feedback survey allows a practice to learn how it can improve according to its current patients and may occur annually or on a more flexible schedule. These surveys may take a broad approach and ask patients to rate the practice on aspects such as cleanliness, friendliness or professionalism. Some surveys may also focus on specific matters, such as feelings toward an employee or what equipment the practice needs to update.

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