Q:

Has there ever been a case of conjoined triplets?

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Quick Answer

There have been no live births of conjoined triplets; however, a 2004 study in the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology recorded a one-of-a-kind case of conjoined triplet fetuses. The three fetuses were diagnosed in the womb and removed through an emergency hysterotomy.

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Full Answer

Though no live conjoined triplet births have been recorded, there have been triplet births that included one set of conjoined twins and one unconnected child. People magazine profiled triplets Macey, Mackenzie and Madeline. At birth, Macey and Mackenzie were connected at the pelvis, shared part of their intestines and had three legs between them. The girls were successfully separated as infants. Though Macey and Mackenzie have only one leg each, they lead active lives and have no serious health problems.

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