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What are the different antibiotics for diverticulitis?

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The specific oral or IV antibiotic treatment for diverticulitis depends on the severity of the diverticulitis attack and the patient's ability to tolerate food. One-drug oral regimen options include Augmentin, doxycycline or moxifloxacin, reports the National Center for Biotechnology Information. Two-drug oral regimen options include Levaquin with ciprofloxacin or Bactrim combined with either Flagyl or clindamycin.

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Full Answer

If IV antibiotics are required, a regimen of cefoxitin, cefotetan, moxifloxacin, ampicillin/sulbactam, ampicillin clavulanate, piperacillin/tazobactam, ticarcillin/clavulanate, imipenem/cilastatin, meropenem or ertapenem is recommended by NCBI. Additionally, an IV regimen of aminoglycoside, third-generation cephalosporin, aztreonam, or a fluoroquinolone plus Flagyl or clindamycin as a treatment option is recommended. Patients are generally switched from IV to oral antibiotics when they can tolerate food. Antibiotic treatment generally lasts between seven and 10 days.

Rifaximin, a poorly absorbed antibiotic, is effective at relieving the symptoms of uncomplicated diverticular disease of the colon when compared with a fiber-supplemented diet, according to NCBI

The severity of diverticulitis is determined using the Hinchey Classification System, according to the NCBI. The Hinchey Classification system has four stages, with stage 4 being the most severe. Stage 1 and stage 2 diverticulitis cases are generally treated with diet and antibiotics, while stage 3 and stage 4 cases generally require surgery.

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