Q:

How do you deal with a patient with diastolic heart failure?

A:

Quick Answer

A doctor may require a patient with diastolic heart failure to take several medications, including ACE inhibitors and ARBs, to avoid hypertension and beta blockers to avoid tachycardia, states the American Family Physician. He may also need to take diuretics to prevent pulmonary congestion.

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How do you deal with a patient with diastolic heart failure?
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Full Answer

Diastolic heart failure is the inability of the left ventricle to relax and fill fully, explains Mayo Clinic. In contrast, systolic heart failure is the inability of the left ventricle to contract and pump blood throughout the body efficiently. Many conditions, such as coronary artery disease, hypertension, abnormal heart rhythms and cardiomyopathy, contribute to the occurrence of heart failure, thus there is a need to take medications to control these conditions.

Aside from strictly taking medicines as directed by the doctor, a patient needs to have a healthy lifestyle to avoid making his condition worse, as mentioned by WebMD. A healthy lifestyle means eating healthy foods and limiting the intake of sodium to less than 2,000 milligram per day. Exercising regularly additionally lowers a person's risk of having heart failure. Losing weight is recommended especially for the obese. Avoiding smoking, as well as second hand smoke, decreases one's risk for heart failure. Limiting alcohol consumption to two drinks per day for men and one drink for women is also recommended.

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