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What causes eye floaters after cataract surgery?

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Quick Answer

Eye floaters after cataract may be due to a condition called posterior vitreous detachment (PVD), reports All About Vision. Eye floaters are quite common after this eye surgery because the procedure may cause eye trauma that results in PVD. Eye floaters are tiny specks, spots, cobweb-like forms and lines that appear in the field of vision as a person moves his eyes, relates WebMD.

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What causes eye floaters after cataract surgery?
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Full Answer

PVD is a condition in which the jelly-like substance, which is found at the back of the eye, separates from the wall at the back of the eye. Eye floaters are the small bits of vitreous substance that becomes detach and seem to float in the field of vision. PVD is more prevalent in older people because this gel-like substance, which is called the vitreous humor, becomes more liquid with age and leads to its detachment. Eye floaters are more common in people between the ages of 50 and 75, explains WebMD.

Eye floaters and PVDs may be one complication associated with cataract surgery, reports Improve Your Vision. However, the symptom of eye floaters will become less noticeable with time. It may take a few weeks or even months to see some improvement. If new floaters develop after the problem has been resolved, it may indicate a retinal tear. Similarly, although most PVD cases are not emergency situations, some can pull on the retina, leading to damage and a retinal tear, specifies All About Vision.

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