Q:

Does cataract eye surgery hurt?

A:

Quick Answer

Cataract eye surgery does not hurt because anesthetic eye drops or injection is typically used on adults. Children are given a general anesthesic that allows them to sleep painlessly through the procedure. After surgery, any pain is relieved with over-the-counter medications.

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Does cataract eye surgery hurt?
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Full Answer

Prior to cataract surgery, adults are lightly sedated, The New York Times reports. Although they are awake, patients are relaxed and sleepy. A small spring holds the eye open, so blinking is not an issue. Patients are unable to observe any part of the surgery. They only see lights and colors.

A cataract is a painless clouded eye lens, according to MedlinePlus. Light is not able to enter the eye, so vision is reduced. Cataracts generally cause no eye damage. Although they often form as part of the aging process, its is possible for a child to be born with cataracts.

After cataract surgery, patients use two types of eye drops, reports the New York Times. One reduces inflammation, while the other helps avoid infection. Hands should always be washed before handling the drops, advises MedlinePlus. Putting on dark glasses when going outside helps reduce sensitivity. The eye recovers in about two weeks, and new glasses or contacts are prescribed, if necessary.

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