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Can preeclampsia be treated at home?

A:

Quick Answer

Patients can treat symptoms of mild preeclampsia at home, as Healthline details. Extreme preeclampsia, which may put the life of a woman and her baby at risk, necessitates delivery. The condition takes place during pregnancy when a woman has high blood pressure and excess protein levels in her urine.

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Full Answer

Preeclampsia, also known as toxemia, can occur as a result of autoimmune disorders, problems with blood vessels and certain genetic factors, according to Healthine. The risk factors for preeclampsia include obesity, preganancy in early or old age, first pregnancy, and a history of kidney problems, diabetes or high blood pressure. Bed rest, drinking adequate water and cutting down on the intake of salt may aid in curing less serious preeclampsia.

However, prolonged bed rest may lead to blood clots forming in the lungs or legs, cautions WebMD. A patient with preeclampsia should consult with fellow patients and engage in less physical activities. The patient should assess levels of protein in the urine, blood pressure levels, weight and fetal movements on a daily basis.

Doctors can prescribe certain medications for women suffering from severe preeclampsia to help in lowering blood pressure levels, according to Healthline, but steroid injections may quicken the growth of a baby's lungs in such a condition. Additionally, a kidney that does not function properly, abdominal pain, fluid retention in the mother's lungs, seizures and fetal distress may signal that a person is suffering from severe toxemia, which may require more robust types of treatment.

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