Q:

How are bursa sacs involved in bursitis cases?

A:

Quick Answer

Bursitis occurs when the bursa sacs become inflamed and can even fill with fluid, as stated by the Johns Hopkins Department of Orthopaedic Surgery. This condition can be reoccurring, trauma induced or the result of an infection of the bursa sacs.

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Full Answer

Between certain bones and skin, cartilage or ligaments in the body are thin bursa sacs. These small structures help cushion the softer tissues as they move against hard bony spots, such as the elbows, knees and shoulders. Occasionally, bursa become inflamed as a condition known as bursitis. The inflammation usually occurs when there is too much pressure on that particular spot during repetitive movements. Bursitis is commonly seen in athletes, miners and domestic workers. Anyone can develop bursitis, especially those to engage in repetitive movements that put pressure on bony parts of the body.

Moderate to severe bursitis happens when the bursa sacs fill with fluid in an attempt by the body to further reduce friction. This makes the bursa much thicker and bumpy compared to the normally paper thin thickness of healthy bursa sacs. A main symptom of bursitis is swelling, but the area also feels warm and painful. Bursitis caused by an infection makes the skin turn red. If the infection starts spreading, the redness can move with it beyond the area where the bursa are located.

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