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What are some of the arguments in favor of urine therapy?

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The only valid argument in favor of attempting urine therapy is that it probably doesn't harm patients who try it, reports MedicineNet. Although urine therapy adherents claim that tumor proteins present in urine help cancer patients build defensive antibodies against the disease, as of 2015, no valid research exists that this is true. Research even disproves the popular remedy of applying urine to jellyfish stings, which is more likely to aggravate the wound than lessen the pain, states Scientific American.

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Medical research has never substantiated the claims of some cultures that urine can protect the skin, whiten teeth and prevent infections, according to MedicineNet. Although cancer patients have attempted to imbibe it as well as use it to wash their skin, brush their teeth, and irrigate their sinuses and eyes, no evidence exists that this is effective. The amounts of tumor antigens in urine are negligible next to the quantities already available in blood and other parts of the body.

Urine therapy to treat jellyfish stings is based on the amount of salts present in urine; however, the concentration of salts in urine varies, explains Scientific American. If the salts in an application of urine are too dilute, the urine causes the nematocysts in clinging jellyfish cells to release additional venom. Applications more effective in treating jellyfish stings include vinegar or a paste of seawater and baking soda. Afterward, victims can remove attached jellyfish tentacles with shaving cream and a razor.

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