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What are the three types of delegated powers granted by the Constitution?

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Quick Answer

The delegated powers granted to the federal government by the United States Constitution are enumerated powers, implied powers and inherent powers. These powers are spelled out in Article I, Section 8 of the U.S. Constitution.

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Full Answer

Enumerated powers are those directly itemized in the U.S. Constitution, and include the power to declare war, the power to coin money, and the power to raise and maintain a military. Implied powers give the U.S. Congress the authority to create laws necessary to carry out enumerated powers. Inherent powers include fundamental powers held by any national government. These include the power to acquire additional territory, the power to quell rebellions and the power to control or limit immigration.

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