Q:

What is third degree grand larceny?

A:

Quick Answer

Grand larceny in the third degree is a serious theft charge that may, according to LegalMatch, also be called grand theft of the third degree depending on the jurisdiction. Each state decides how much stolen money, goods or property is necessary to qualify for this charge, but it commonly entails thousands of dollars. Most jurisdictions throughout the United States consider grand larceny in any degree a felony offense.

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Full Answer

Maximum and minimum amounts of stolen money or property, as they constitute grand larceny in the third degree, differ by state. New York, for example, applies the charge to theft of money or property falling between $3,000 and $50,000. In Florida, it is between $300 and $20,000. In some states, theft of certain items find crossover with a grand larceny in the third degree charge. In New York, thefts involving ATM machines or their contents invoke this charge. In Florida, firearms or motor vehicle theft apply. According to LegalMatch, grand larceny in the third degree is also frequently associated with white collar crimes like embezzlement.

As qualifications differ, so too do penalties for offenders. On his website, criminal trial lawyer Richard Hornsby notes that Florida imposes possible incarceration of up to five years and/or a fine of $5,000. Depending on circumstance, the judge reserves the right to apply jail time or fines in isolation as she deems fit.

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