Q:

What does the term "total war" mean?

A:

Quick Answer

According to Encyclopaedia Britannica, the term “total war” refers to any military conflict in which the contenders of the war are willing to sacrifice any amount of lives or resources to achieve victory. This differs from traditional war, in which limitations are placed on the military conflict based on social and economic restrictions.

Continue Reading

Full Answer

Most of the deadliest total war conflicts in history have been fought purely on ideological principles. This includes wars that are based around civil and religious conflicts. Historians suggest that the concept of total war was first conceived in the 19th century by Prussian war strategist Carl von Clausewitz. It was his belief that wars had to be fought with manpower and not laws. In one of his writings, “Vom Kriege,” Clausewitz suggested that warfare in the 18th century was limited due to the fact that strategists believed the key to victory was winning small military victories to use as bargaining chips during diplomatic talks.

During World War I, many countries entered into total war. This included Britain, which entered into total war in May 1915. Its state of total war lasted until November 1918. During this time the entire country was put on mandatory war alert, which was completely controlled by the government.

Learn more about Military

Related Questions

  • Q:

    What were the consequences of the Vietnam War?

    A:

    In addition to the untold consequences for military families due to the massive loss of 58,000 American lives during the conflict, the Vietnam War led to the end of the military draft in the United States, a reduction in the voting age to age 18, restriction of a sitting president's ability to send military forces into combat, weakened and undermined morale among the U.S. military and caused damage to the American economy. In addition, the Vietnam War caused divisions in the Democratic Party and caused Americans to be suspicious of their government. Returning soldiers fared little better, with an estimated 700,000 Vietnam veterans suffering from the psychological after effects of war.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What happened in Greece after the Peloponnesian War?

    A:

    The aftermath of the Peloponnesian War included many different sources of hardship for Greece, which had lost many men and much of its financial resources during the conflict. Greece's most prominent city-states continued to struggle for power even after the war ended, leading to a difficult era of extended conflict between Sparta, Athens and Thebes.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is a two-front war?

    A:

    In military terms, a two-front war is one in which fighting occurs in separate locations at the same general time. Some well-known two-front wars include both World Wars of the 20th century, the Napoleonic wars and several Israeli-Arab wars.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What are the requirements to join the VFW?

    A:

    To be eligible to join the VFW, or Veterans of Foreign Wars, a person must be a U.S. citizen who has served in the military honorably in an overseas conflict, received a campaign medal for overseas service, served 60 nonconsecutive or 30 consecutive days in Korea, or received imminent danger or hostile-fire pay. There are no age requirements for joining the organization.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore