Q:

What is the sentence for criminal trespassing?

A:

Quick Answer

Sentencing for a charge of criminal trespassing depends on the degree of the charge, the state and court in which the charge is filed, and the defendant's criminal history. Unless the charge is a felony, most defendants are looking at a fine or probation, according to NOLO.

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Full Answer

If the criminal trespassing charge is a less serious degree, the court usually imposes a fine and perhaps probation. A more serious criminal trespassing charge may come with jail time, depending on the nature of the charge. A jail sentence for a criminal trespassing charge is rare. Additionally, defendants may find themselves on probation, either supervised or unsupervised, states NOLO.

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