Q:

Is a seat belt ticket a moving violation?

A:

Quick Answer

A seat belt ticket is not a moving violation in most states; however, child safety restraint laws are closely related to seat belt laws, reports DrivingLaws.org. New York is an example of a state in which a seat belt ticket can be both a moving and a non-moving violation.

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Is a seat belt ticket a moving violation?
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Full Answer

According to Drivinglaws.org, a total of 31 states recognize seat belt laws as primary laws, which means an officer can pull a motorist over just for not wearing one. There are 18 states that recognize seat belt laws as secondary laws, which means a motorist must be pulled over for another violation prior to being issued a seat belt ticket. The remaining state, New Hampshire, stands alone as the only state that has no mandatory seat belt requirement.

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