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Who said, "Man is by nature a political animal"?

A:

Quick Answer

The Greek philosopher Aristotle, who lived from 384 to 322 B.C., said, "Man is by nature a political animal." These words are part of his "A Treatise on Government."

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In these words and the ones preceding them, "Hence it is evident that a city is a natural production," Aristotle states his belief that government is natural. He speaks of how the natural progression of man proves he is not meant to be alone. Couples grow into families, and households join into villages. All involved have a share in the good of others. Aristotle goes on to discuss how man has the ability to speak to allow him to communicate the basic precepts needed for government, and he is given the intelligence to establish a government and its laws.

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