Q:

What is the purpose of the electoral college?

A:

Quick Answer

The purpose of the electoral college is to be a compromise between election of the president by the vote of Congress and the popular vote of the people. The founding fathers established the electoral college in the United States Constitution, believing that it would be both a buffer and provide fair power to all states regardless of size.

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What is the purpose of the electoral college?
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Full Answer

The electoral college consists of 538 electors, and of those, a candidate needs 270 votes to become president. Although the Founding Fathers wanted the people to have a say, there was concern that a charismatic tyrant could manipulate public opinion and come into power. Alexander Hamilton briefly addressed these concerns in the Federalist Papers. The idea was that the electors would be a group of people who would ensure that a qualified person would become president.

The first design of the electoral college allowed each state the same number of electors as senators, which was always two, plus the same number of its U.S. Representatives. Each elector met within its own state rather than one large meeting altogether. The founding fathers believed this would prevent bribery, corruption and secret dealings. The candidate with the most electoral votes, provided it was the majority, became president. The candidate with the second most electoral votes became vice president. This lasted through the first four presidential elections when the powers that be realized ties were inevitable. The process was changed to include one vote for president and a separate vote for vice president, but still required a majority vote in order for a candidate to take office.

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Related Questions

  • Q:

    Should the electoral college be abolished?

    A:

    The electoral college has always had strong opponents who have argued that it should be abolished. Their reasons include the fact that, under certain circumstances, a president can be elected without winning the majority of electoral votes. They also point out that electors are free to vote however they wish and claim that the electoral college makes it impossible for third-party and independent candidates to be elected.

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  • Q:

    How does the Electoral College work?

    A:

    Generally, members of the Electoral College cast all of the votes for the presidential candidate that receives the most votes in their respective states. There are a few states, however, that permit electoral votes to be split.

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  • Q:

    How do the Electoral College votes work?

    A:

    The Electoral College is a process established for the purpose of electing U.S. presidents in which each state and the District of Columbia have a certain number of electoral votes, based on the number of U.S. Representatives and Senators from the state. Electors are chosen from each state and cast ballots on the first Monday after the second Wednesday in December of an election year.

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  • Q:

    Why do the results of the Electoral College sometimes not align with the results of the popular vote?

    A:

    The popular vote is an indication of overall numerical support while the Electoral College is a reflection of specialized voting within a constructed subset of the United States democratic process, meaning it does not necessarily reflect the will of the majority. Each state is invested with a certain number of electoral votes, which are fixed and not related to the population of said state.

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