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What is a procedural vote?

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Quick Answer

A procedural vote is a vote having to do with procedures such as setting an agenda, postponing an item or limiting a speaker's time. These votes are usually individual and include housekeeping issues.

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Full Answer

Procedural voting is different from substantive voting which involves voting to pass treaties, amendments, resolutions and other documents. Substantive voting often occurs in a voting bloc. Motions also fall into the categories of procedural or substantive, with procedural motions having to do with the process of introducing documents and other items to a committee. Substantive motions have to do with formal proposals that introduce a course of action for consideration.

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