Q:

How do you petition for a name change in Arkansas?

A:

Quick Answer

An adult residing in Arkansas who wishes to change his name must file a Petition for Change of Name with the Circuit Court or Chancery in the jurisdiction of one's residence, according to Arkansas state law. An adult in Arkansas is defined as anyone of 18 years of age.

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Full Answer

The petitioner who chooses to change his name must have the Petition for Change of Name notarized and file a fee with their County Clerk. A court hearing may be established if the petitioner seeks a name change for reasons other than marriage or divorce. A Circuit Judge asks for a simple reason for the change. Once the judge has signed the petition, the petitioner must notify the public of the new name change.

Name changes that are obscene, offensive, cause deliberate confusion, use the name of a celebrity or affect the rights of another individual are not granted. Fact sheets for name change directions and Name Change Petition forms can be reviewed and downloaded at the Arkansas legal services name-change Web portal. County Circuit Judges prefer petitions to be typed, however, if typing is not possible, then legible penmanship is required. Also, a petitioner should be mindful of spelling errors as any changes require a second petitioning process.

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