Q:

What is a pending warrant?

A:

Quick Answer

A pending warrant is an impending document issued by a magistrate authorizing police officers to make an arrest, conduct a search or seize property. Felony warrants are executed anywhere and at any time of the day or the night. Time restrictions are placed on when misdemeanor warrants can be executed.

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What is a pending warrant?
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Full Answer

In many cases, misdemeanor warrants cannot be executed between the hours of 10 p.m. and 6 a.m. when the defendant is in his own residence. The only time this does not apply is when the warrant is endorsed for night service. Warrants never expire. They stay in the system until they are executed or recalled by the court.

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