Q:

Do I have to pay child support if I'm not on the baby's birth certificate?

A:

Quick Answer

Nolo explains that a parent is not required to pay child support until he is established as a legal parent, by a paternity test, court order or other legal means. An unmarried father who signs an acknowledgement of paternity pays child support, even without his name on the birth certificate.

Know More

Full Answer

Nolo states that a father must pay child support once he acknowledges paternity or if he is the presumed or equitable parent. A father who is married to the child's mother is presumed to be the child's biological father: As the legal father, he must pay child support.

Depending on the state, someone who invites the child into his home and holds the child out as his own may be required to pay child support. A step-parent may be obligated to support a child if he legally adopts the child, according to J Rank.

Learn more about Child Support & Custody

Related Questions

  • Q:

    How can you enforce child support?

    A:

    Enforcing child support involves asking the local or state child support service office to follow up with the delinquent noncustodial parent to ensure child support is paid promptly, according to DivorceNet from Nolo. Agencies have a variety of methods to compel payment in a timely manner.

    Full Answer >
  • Q:

    How does SSDI impact child support?

    A:

    When a parent who pays child support begins to receive social security disability insurance payments, he may be eligible for modification of his child support requirement, according to Nolo. This is especially true if the amount of his SSDI payment is substantially lower than his previous income. When a parent receives SSDI, the child sometimes becomes eligible for dependent's benefits. In some cases, the court may lower the child support obligation by the amount the child receives from these benefits.

    Full Answer >
  • Q:

    How does child support work?

    A:

    The child support process involves opening a child support case with the state child support office, establishing paternity, evaluating financial records and child expenses, ruling a child support order, and enforcing payment, according to the Georgia Division of Child Support Services. The noncustodial parent must be located during the process.

    Full Answer >
  • Q:

    What is the typical procedure for a child support court case?

    A:

    The typical procedure for a child support case involves making a formal application, establishing paternity, attending the court hearing and receiving the final determination from the court. A court process is often initiated when the child's parents do not reach an agreement regarding custodial rights, notes Findlaw.

    Full Answer >

Explore