Q:

How old does a child have to be for a parent to no longer have to pay child suport?

A:

Quick Answer

The age to stop paying child support varies by state, but in some states child support ends when the child turns 18 and graduates from high school. The age of majority is the legal age established by the laws of the state that declare an individual an adult.

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Full Answer

While most state laws use 18 as the age when child support ends, some states extend it to 21. Mississippi, New York and the District of Columbia have child support laws that end support when the child turns 21. Many states will terminate child support when the child graduates high school, which could vary in age from 18 to 20 in most situations.

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Related Questions

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    How can you enforce child support?

    A:

    Enforcing child support involves asking the local or state child support service office to follow up with the delinquent noncustodial parent to ensure child support is paid promptly, according to DivorceNet from Nolo. Agencies have a variety of methods to compel payment in a timely manner.

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  • Q:

    How do you get child support?

    A:

    To get child support, the custodial parent must contact the child support office within the state where the parent and the children reside and complete an application to apply, according to the U.S. Office of Child Support Enforcement. Paternity must be established before child support can be ordered.

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    How do you file for child support?

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    To file for child support services, the custodial parent should contact the social services or child support office in the state where the custodial parent and the children live, according to the South Dakota Department of Social Services. An application may be requested in order to begin the process.

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  • Q:

    How does disability of a noncustodial parent affect child support?

    A:

    Supplemental Security Income, or SSI, benefits are not counted as income in determining a disabled noncustodial parent's child support obligations in most states, but Social Security Disability Income, or SSDI, benefits are counted as income, explains Lawyers.com. Social Security benefits paid directly to the child based on a noncustodial parent's disability may offset the parent's child support obligations in most states.

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