Q:

What are Ohio sobriety checkpoints?

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Quick Answer

Law enforcement officers stop cars to check for intoxicated drivers at Ohio sobriety checkpoints, sometimes known as DUI roadblocks, according to the Ohio State Bar Association. Sobriety checkpoints are constitutional, as decided by the U.S. Supreme Court.

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What are Ohio sobriety checkpoints?
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Full Answer

The Highway Patrol uses sobriety checkpoints as a deterrent against drunk driving, especially during weekends and holidays when drunk driving is more prevalent, explains the Ohio State Bar Association. Sobriety checkpoints are always announced in advance, as is required by law. The percentage of cars pulled over depends on the volume of cars that day and must be uniformly random, states the Ohio State Highway Patrol.

Officers require selected drivers to do a number of sobriety tests, explains the Ohio State Highway Patrol. Sobriety tests include a structured walk and turn, a one-legged stand and an alcohol gaze nystagmus examination. In some cases officers may also need drivers to take a breathalyzer test. Officers detain and arrest intoxicated drivers.

Though officers are usually unable to stop drivers without suspicion of breaking the law, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled sobriety checkpoints legal in the 1990s, according to the Ohio State Bar Association. The court found that the benefits in reducing drunk driving outweigh the intrusion and inconvenience to drivers.

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