Q:

How much do you get paid to be a foster parent?

A:

Quick Answer

While states do not pay foster parents an income or salary, they do provide financial support intended for the child's care in the form of subsidies, reimbursements or direct payments. The amount of the payment varies by state and the age of the child.

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Full Answer

In addition to age, states may vary amounts based on the type of foster care provided and a child's medical needs. For example, Maryland's standard monthly payment is $835 for children under 11 and $850 for children 12 and older. Intermediate foster home caregivers receive monthly payments of $950 for children 11 and under and $965 for children 12 and over.

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Related Questions

  • Q:

    How much was a foster parent paid in 2014?

    A:

    The amount the state paid a foster parent in 2014 varies by the state, age of the child and the level of care, but the monthly base rate in Oregon for a child under 5 was $575. In Florida, the state paid foster parents $429 for a child under 5.

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  • Q:

    How much are the payments to foster parents?

    A:

    Payments to foster parents are calculated based on the estimated cost of care for the foster child and differ by the child's needs, age and the state of residency. Some states also vary payments for long-term, short-term and emergency foster parents.

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  • Q:

    What is a foster family?

    A:

    A foster family is a family that takes in a child for what is usually a short time to provide care that the parents are unable to provide. Though occasionally a foster child lives with his foster family for years, that situation is not the norm.

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  • Q:

    How does disability of a noncustodial parent affect child support?

    A:

    Supplemental Security Income, or SSI, benefits are not counted as income in determining a disabled noncustodial parent's child support obligations in most states, but Social Security Disability Income, or SSDI, benefits are counted as income, explains Lawyers.com. Social Security benefits paid directly to the child based on a noncustodial parent's disability may offset the parent's child support obligations in most states.

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