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What is the main duty of the legislative branch?

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Quick Answer

The primary duty of the legislative branch of government is to introduce, review and pass legislation. The legislative branch of the government is the only branch of the government that can pass new laws. This is done through the utilization of a committee system, which divides the members of Congress into smaller groups that are responsible for reviewing legislation and determining whether to introduce it to the floor for debate.

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What is the main duty of the legislative branch?
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Full Answer

The legislative branch of the government is comprised of two houses. The House of Representatives has 435 members elected to two-year terms. The number of members elected to the House of Representatives that is granted to each state is determined by that state's population. The Senate is comprised of 100 Senators, two from each state, who are elected to six-year terms. The terms of Senators are staggered, however, so that at any given time, about one-third of the Senate is up for re-election. In addition to its legislative duties, the legislative branch of the government is also responsible for declaring war, approving treaties, impeaching officials, investigating those situations that impede or affect the ability of the government to function properly and approving officials appointed by the president. In addition to those powers outlined in the U.S. Constitution, Congress also has the power to enact any law that it deems "necessary and proper."

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    Who does legislation affect?

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    According to the White House, legislation affects both the citizens of the United States and government officials. From emergency election of the president to bills regulating various industries and personal freedoms, there are varying forms of legislation that impact different groups of people in different ways.

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    The judicial branch of the U.S. government declares laws unconstitutional. The federal courts of the judicial branch have the sole power to determine the constitutionality of the law, interpret the law and apply the law to cases that are brought before it. Article III of the U.S. Constitution established the judicial branch to balance the powers of the legislative and executive branches of government.

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    What is another name for the legislative branch of the U.S. government?

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