Q:

How long does a DUI stay on your criminal record?

A:

Quick Answer

According to The Law Dictionary, a DUI conviction is a permanent part of an individual's criminal record. Although laws vary among states, most have processes in place to remove or conceal certain criminal convictions.

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Full Answer

The Law Dictionary explains that removing, or expunging, a conviction from a criminal record is a complicated and lengthy process. A conviction is more likely to be expunged if it is a misdemeanor, a first time offense and no one is injured or killed. Even if the process is successful, some agencies can still access an expunged conviction. It is best to consult an attorney regarding the laws and process in each state.

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Related Questions

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    How long does a DUI stay on your record in Georgia?

    A:

    After conviction, a DUI stays on a driver's record in Georgia forever. Drivers get a DUI if they are pulled over and have a blood alcohol count of 0.08 percent or higher.

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  • Q:

    How long does a Class B misdemeanor for theft less than $500 stay on your record in Texas?

    A:

    According to the Peveto Law office, a Class B misdemeanor conviction in Texas stays on a person's record forever. If a misdemeanor charge is eligible for deferred adjudication, a charge reduction or pretrial diversion, it is possible to have it cleared from the record through expungement or non-disclosure.

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    What is the way to find someone's permanent record?

    A:

    Permanent records are requested from the agency, organization or company that has the authority to issue the documents; for example, according to the U.S. Department of State, an individual's FBI criminal record must be requested from the Criminal Justice Information Services Division. A local police check is obtained from a police report in the town where an individual lives.

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    What is the punishment for tampering with evidence?

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    Punishment for those found guilty of tampering with evidence depends on the state in which the conviction occurs. According to Ohio criminal defense attorneys Luftman, Heck & Associates, conviction is punishable by a jail sentence of up to 36 months and a third degree felony charge. Potential offenders must first have been aware of an investigation either currently in process or imminent at the time of committing the act.

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