Q:

What is legislative power?

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Quick Answer

Legislative power is the ability to make laws. In the United States, the constitution grants the power to make laws to make federal laws to Congress.

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Full Answer

In the United States, Congress is comprised of the Senate and the House of Representatives. Each of these is comprised of elected officials from the 50 states.The number of representatives for each state in the House of Representatives is determined by each state's respective population. Regardless of population, each state elects two senators to the Senate. Once a bill is introduced into Congress, it is reviewed by one of the 70 Senate subcommittees. If the bill is passed by the subcommittee, it goes on to one of the 17 Senate full committees. Once a bill is approved by the committee, it goes to the floor of Congress for a vote. Only a majority of votes is needed to pass a bill into law. Most bills undergo a lot of revision on the way to becoming law. The President of the United States also has the ability to veto all or part of a bill if he does not approve of it. Congress may still pass the law, however, if a two-thirds majority of both the House of Representatives and the Senate agree to do so.

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Related Questions

  • Q:

    What are examples of a chief legislator?

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    A chief legislator most often refers to the president of the United States, who has the authority to influence members of Congress to make laws through veto power, signing a bill, speaking directly to Congress and meeting with individual members of the legislative body. Article II, Section 3 of the Constitution of the United States gives the president the authority to "recommend... such measures as... necessary and expedient."

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  • Q:

    What is the difference between federal and state governments?

    A:

    The federal government, under the powers of the U.S. Constitution, is given the power to make laws, veto laws, oversee foreign policy and national defense, impose tariffs, impeach officials, enter into treaties, interpret the Constitution, interpret laws and revise laws that allow one state to impede on the rights of another. Beyond that, the 10th amendment gives power to the states to govern themselves.

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    What is the most important power of Congress?

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    The most important power of Congress is the authority to make laws. A bill, also known as a proposed law, only becomes an official law after the House of Representatives and Senate have both approved it.

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  • Q:

    How do you explain the non-legislative powers of Congress?

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    Apart from the power to propose and pass laws, Congress has several non-legislative powers including the following: powers to impeach, tax, amend the Constitution, declare war, elect the President in case there is no majority in the electoral college, ratification of treaties and trade agreements, confirmation of appointments and certain investigative powers. Some of these belong to the Senate and some to the House of Representatives.

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