Q:

Who does legislation affect?

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Quick Answer

According to the White House, legislation affects both the citizens of the United States and government officials. From emergency election of the president to bills regulating various industries and personal freedoms, there are varying forms of legislation that impact different groups of people in different ways.

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Full Answer

According to the White House, legislation occurs through the House of Representatives and the Senate, both of which form the Congress. Congress passes legislation that affects everyone from the President of the United States to individual taxpayers. Legislative authority is used to create the annual budget, which determines how much assistance Americans who benefit from various government services, such as public education and welfare, will receive.

According to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, legislation commonly affects large organizations and companies first, and the benefits or disadvantages then affect individual citizens. For example, legislation addressing the amount of nutrients that companies must add to certain food products first affects the companies who manufacture food. Companies then have to adjust their manufacturing process to meet the requirements of the relevant legislation, and consumers are in turn affected by increased or lowered product cost and availability. Most legislation works by addressing larger groups or organizations in the hopes that the effects will trickle down to individual citizens.

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Related Questions

  • Q:

    What are the different types of legislation?

    A:

    In the United States, there are four basic types of legislation: bills, resolutions, constitutional amendments and ballot measures. Bills become laws through the legislative processes at federal, state and local levels, whereas resolutions are collective actions taken by legislators. U.S. constitutional amendments start in Congress before going to states for approval, and ballot measures are added to state and local issues by initiative petitions from citizens or by legislatures.

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  • Q:

    How do Senate rules differ from House rules?

    A:

    A significant difference between United States Senate rules and House of Representatives rules is that the procedures in the Senate favor deliberation rather than quick action, while the House allows a numerical majority to push through legislation in a relatively much shorter length of time. The Senate rules also provide no more than only a few formal tools that enable a numerical majority to propose an item for consideration. Negotiations between majority and minority party leadership must typically take place before the leader of the majority party clears an item for action on the Senate floor.

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  • Q:

    What are the president's powers?

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    The Constitution of the United States assigns several powers to the president, including the power to veto or sign legislation, convene or adjourn Congress and command the armed forces. The U.S. President also nominates and assigns heads of governmental departments, issues pardons for federal offenses and issues executive orders without congressional approval.

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  • Q:

    What is the definition of presidential succession?

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    The U.S. presidential line of succession is the set order of officials who act as the President of the United States if the president dies, becomes incapacitated, resigns or is removed from office by impeachment. The Presidential Succession Act of 1947 was signed into law by Harry Truman in 1947.

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