Q:

What are some important federal health care laws?

A:

Quick Answer

Important U.S. federal health care laws include Title XVIII of the Security Act, which authorized the Medicare program in 1965; Title XIX of the Social Security Act, which authorized the Medicaid program, also in 1965; and Title XXI, which authorized the Children's Health Insurance Program in 1997. Other significant legislation includes the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, passed in 1996, and the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010, according to Health Information and the Law.

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Full Answer

The Medicare program guarantees that all individuals over age 65 have access to health insurance and provides insurance to certain younger people with disabilities and end-stage diseases. The Medicaid program provides federal funds to individual states to assist them in providing insurance and other health services to low-income residents. The Children's Health Insurance Program provides health insurance for children from low-income families, reports Health Information and the Law.

The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act established rules concerning the security and privacy of individual health records and set forth procedures governing access to information, according to Health Information and the Law. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 instituted a requirement that all U.S. citizens must carry health insurance. The Act also expanded eligibility for Medicaid and created health insurance exchanges.

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