Q:

What happens when a house is condemned?

A:

Quick Answer

When a house is condemned, the residents are given a notice to vacate the premises, usually with a short compliance period of one to 30 days, according to the City of St. Paul, Minn. In some instances the house is deemed too hazardous to be inhabited and the residents are required to move immediately.

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What happens when a house is condemned?
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Full Answer

The City of St. Paul notes that if the issues that caused the house to be condemned are corrected before the notice to vacate expires, the notice can be lifted and vacating the premises is no longer necessary. If the issues are corrected after the notice expires and the property has been vacated, the property can be lived in again. Structural problems, fire hazards, rodent or pest infestations and lack of access to basic facilities or utilities can all lead to a house being condemned. Massachusetts Legal Help notes that once a building has been condemned, the landlord, owner or tenant can appear at a court hearing to challenge the condemnation. In Massachusetts, people who are asked to vacate their homes because of condemnation can apply for city assistance. This assistance can be relocation help to find a new or temporary place to live while repairs are made on the house or a relocation assistance payment to help cover moving expenses.

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