Q:

What is fourth degree burglary in Maryland?

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Quick Answer

According to the criminal defense team of Silverman, Thompson, Slutkin and White, fourth degree burglary is the act of being inside a house or building of another without permission. This also includes entering a person's yard without his permission with the intent to steal from his yard or the attached house.

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What is fourth degree burglary in Maryland?
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Full Answer

Fourth degree burglary is also commonly referred to as breaking and entering. Although the physical act of “breaking” does not need to occur, it is simply the act of entering a secure premises without the legal consent to do so. The Silverman, Thompson, Slutkin, and White website also states that being in possession of burglar’s tools, such as a crowbar or picklock, with the intent to use said tools to break into someone’s house, storehouse or car is classified as fourth degree burglary. Under Maryland State Law burglary is categorized into four different degrees, with first degree burglary being the most serious offense, and fourth degree burglary being the least serious offense. Burglary investigations can be challenging and often require the use of evidence such as fingerprints and cellphone technology.

Penalties may vary, but according to the Maryland Criminal Defense Lawyers website, fourth degree burglary is classified as a misdemeanor and could potentially be penalized with up to three years in prison. There are several specific factors pertaining to each individual case that determine the extent of the penalty received.

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