Q:

What are the federal laws regarding employment for teenagers?

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Quick Answer

The federal laws for teenage employment limit the types of jobs available and the number of hours that they can work based on the age of the child, says the U.S. Department of Labor. Generally, the restrictions decrease as the child gets older.

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What are the federal laws regarding employment for teenagers?
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Full Answer

Children under 14 have limited legal job opportunities that include delivering newspapers, babysitting, acting, or working for certain businesses owned by the parents, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. Once a child reaches 14 or 15, more jobs are available, including retail, delivery, yard work, food service and loading objects. At this age, a child may not work more than three hours a day, more than 18 hours a week or past 7 p.m. during the school year. In the summer, a child who is 14 or 15 may not work more than eight hours a day, more than 40 hours a week or past 9 p.m.

Once a child reaches the age of 16 or 17, work hours are unlimited, but the jobs available are limited to any job not deemed hazardous by the Secretary of Labor, reports the U.S. Department of Labor. Teenagers who reach the age of 18 do not have any limits on the hours they can work or the types of jobs they can perform.

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