US Government

A:

There are many benefits to being President of the United States: an annual salary; expense and travel accounts; housing in the White Hose, Camp David, and a guest house; Presidential State Car; Air Force One and Marine One for transportation; protection by the Secret Service; and great retirement benefits. While the position of president is not the most lucrative, the benefits compensate for the pay.

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  • How Does the Government Borrow Money?

    Q: How Does the Government Borrow Money?

    A: According to the U.S. Treasury Department, the U.S. government borrows money primarily through the issuance of U.S. Treasury bonds. Part of the bonds are open to the public; individuals, state governments, foreign governments and corporations can buy them. U.S. trust funds with surpluses, such as Social Security, purchase non-marketable bonds, so the U.S. Treasury receives funds to pay its bills but cannot sell the bond on the marketplace.
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  • Is There Gold in Fort Knox?

    Q: Is There Gold in Fort Knox?

    A: Fort Knox has been the site of the United States Bullion Depository since 1937, and it contains approximately 3 percent of all the gold that has ever been refined. At various times, the depository has held other valuable items, but gold remains its main holding.
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  • Which Sesame Street Character Testified in Front of Congress?

    Q: Which Sesame Street Character Testified in Front of Congress?

    A: Celebrities have been known to testify in front of Congress for causes they care about, but only one of those celebrities was a red, fuzzy monster. In 2002, Elmo, a beloved resident of Sesame Street, met with Congress to discuss more funding for music programs in schools.
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  • What Are the Duties of Congress?

    Q: What Are the Duties of Congress?

    A: Congress has many duties, including collecting taxes, paying the country's debt and providing for the safety of its citizens. Congress is also responsible for making laws.
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  • How Often Is the State of the Union Address Given?

    Q: How Often Is the State of the Union Address Given?

    A: The State of the Union address is mandated by the Constitution and given once per year, in early January. Prior to 1934, the State of the Union address was given in December, but that changed when the opening of Congress moved from March to January.
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  • What Led to the Rise of Political Parties in the 1790's?

    Q: What Led to the Rise of Political Parties in the 1790's?

    A: The rise of political parties in the 1790's was largely the result of the formation of groups with opposing views about the structure of government. The first two groups were the Federalists, who supported a loose interpretation of the Constitution and a strong central government, and the Republicans, who supported the opposite. These two groups became the first "political parties."
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  • What Is Federal Bureaucracy?

    Q: What Is Federal Bureaucracy?

    A: Federal bureaucracy refers to the organization of government offices that implement public policy. Highly complex societies require federal bureaucracy to manage public programs and ensure the enforcement of legislation. The bureaucracy controls everything from collecting tax revenue, to monitoring public safety programs and regulating the economy.
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  • What Are the Rules for Flying the American Flag?

    Q: What Are the Rules for Flying the American Flag?

    A: Rules for flying the American Flag fall under several categories: the folding and unfolding of the flag, the method of display, the definition of a flag and flag proportions. All flags must meet the United States Flag Code.
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  • How Do You Receive a Congressional Medal of Honor?

    Q: How Do You Receive a Congressional Medal of Honor?

    A: The process for receiving the Medal of Honor, often inaccurately referred to as the Congressional Medal of Honor, is intricate. First, the individual must exhibit an extraordinary act of valor in combat. After this deed is witnessed, the recommendation for the award is passed up a chain of responsible persons culminating with the president. If the soldier, sailor or marine gains approval, the president awards the medal personally.
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  • When Will the 1950 U.S. Federal Census Be Available Online?

    Q: When Will the 1950 U.S. Federal Census Be Available Online?

    A: According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the records from the 1950 Census are scheduled for release on April 1, 2022. Records from the U.S. Census are not made publicly accessible until 72 years after the census of population and housing has taken place.
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  • What Does the Department of Labor Do?

    Q: What Does the Department of Labor Do?

    A: According to its mission statement, the U.S. Department of Labor exists to "foster, promote and develop the welfare" of workers, those seeking employment and those who are retired. The Department of Labor is committed to doing this through the improvement of working conditions, creating work opportunities and overseeing the administration of workers' rights laws.
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  • What Is a National Budget?

    Q: What Is a National Budget?

    A: A national budget is the proposal of revenues and expenditures a government expects for a given fiscal year. It is much like any budget in that it estimates necessary spending against necessary income, only on a much larger scale.
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  • What Are the Duties of the U.S. Senate?

    Q: What Are the Duties of the U.S. Senate?

    A: The U.S. Senate proposes and considers new laws, approves or rejects presidential nominations, provides advice and consent on international treaties, and serves as the high court for impeachment trials. Although the U.S. House of Representatives also works on new legislation, only the Senate performs the other three duties.
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  • What Is the Purpose of the Preamble?

    Q: What Is the Purpose of the Preamble?

    A: The purpose of the preamble is the outline the reasons behind the writing of the U.S. Constitution and the goals of the document. Although the preamble gives useful insight into the framers' intentions, the courts do not use it as a source of rights or powers that are not specifically enumerated in the body of the U.S. Constitution.
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  • What Is a Summary of the 13th Amendment to the Constitution?

    Q: What Is a Summary of the 13th Amendment to the Constitution?

    A: The 13th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution pertains to the abolition of slavery and involuntary servitude. It was adopted on Dec. 6, 1865, as part of a suite of amendments passed in response to the Civil War, regarding civil rights and black suffrage.
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  • How Long Is a Senator's Term in Office?

    Q: How Long Is a Senator's Term in Office?

    A: United States senators serve 6-year terms, although they may seek reelection after each term, and there is no formal or official limit to the number of years or terms a senator may serve. Senators may resign voluntarily or opt to not seek reelection, and they can also be formally expelled by the Senate in the case of wrongdoing; in these cases, two-thirds of the Senate must vote for expulsion, and it is very rare for this process to occur. Each senator serves alongside a fellow senator from the same state, and each state in the union is accorded two Senate seats, as are two unofficial "shadow senators" from the District of Columbia.
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  • What Is Judicial Power?

    Q: What Is Judicial Power?

    A: Judicial power involves constitutional authority assigned to courts and judges, according to the Free Dictionary. The authority enables them to interpret and apply the law, arbitrate legal disputes and carry out justice.
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  • How Many Times Can a Governor Be Elected?

    Q: How Many Times Can a Governor Be Elected?

    A: Every state has its own constitution in which governor term limits are outlined. There are 37 states that place various term limits on state governors and elections.
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  • What Is a Right or Freedom From the First Amendment?

    Q: What Is a Right or Freedom From the First Amendment?

    A: According to Cornell University Law School, the First Amendment protects the rights to freedom of religion, the right to assemble, and freedom of expression, which includes freedom of speech and of the press. It also provides the right to petition the government in the event of grievances.
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  • What Are the Strengths and Weaknesses of the Constitution?

    Q: What Are the Strengths and Weaknesses of the Constitution?

    A: The United States Constitution provides the foundation for a strong central government with authority to regulate interstate disputes and commerce, enforce citizens' rights and defend from hostile forces. However, much of it is too vague to provide definitive interpretations. It can be amended, but the process is slow. Citizens vote for representatives directly but don't get a direct vote on policies. There is no way to address bipartisanship.
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  • How Many Presidents Have Resigned From Office?

    Q: How Many Presidents Have Resigned From Office?

    A: There has been only one president to resign from office. That president was Richard Nixon on Aug. 9, 1974. Minutes after his resignation, Vice President Gerald R. Ford was sworn into office as the 37th president of the United States.
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