US Government

A:

Judges are not responsible for making laws. Judges are responsible for interpreting laws, assessing any evidence presented and imposing penalties while remaining impartial in their rulings to ensure justice is fairly served.

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  • Is there gold in Fort Knox?

    Q: Is there gold in Fort Knox?

    A: Fort Knox has been the site of the United States Bullion Depository since 1937, and it contains approximately 3 percent of all the gold that has ever been refined. At various times, the depository has held other valuable items, but gold remains its main holding.
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  • What is a national budget?

    Q: What is a national budget?

    A: A national budget is the proposal of revenues and expenditures a government expects for a given fiscal year. It is much like any budget in that it estimates necessary spending against necessary income, only on a much larger scale.
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  • When will the 1950 U.S. Federal Census be available online?

    Q: When will the 1950 U.S. Federal Census be available online?

    A: According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the records from the 1950 Census are scheduled for release on April 1, 2022. Records from the U.S. Census are not made publicly accessible until 72 years after the census of population and housing has taken place.
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  • How do you receive a Congressional Medal of Honor?

    Q: How do you receive a Congressional Medal of Honor?

    A: The process for receiving the Medal of Honor, often inaccurately referred to as the Congressional Medal of Honor, is intricate. First, the individual must exhibit an extraordinary act of valor in combat. After this deed is witnessed, the recommendation for the award is passed up a chain of responsible persons culminating with the president. If the soldier, sailor or marine gains approval, the president awards the medal personally.
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  • What are the rules for flying the American flag?

    Q: What are the rules for flying the American flag?

    A: Rules for flying the American Flag fall under several categories: the folding and unfolding of the flag, the method of display, the definition of a flag and flag proportions. All flags must meet the United States Flag Code.
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  • What are the duties of Congress?

    Q: What are the duties of Congress?

    A: Congress has many duties, including collecting taxes, paying the country's debt and providing for the safety of its citizens. Congress is also responsible for making laws.
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  • What is federal bureaucracy?

    Q: What is federal bureaucracy?

    A: Federal bureaucracy refers to the organization of government offices that implement public policy. Highly complex societies require federal bureaucracy to manage public programs and ensure the enforcement of legislation. The bureaucracy controls everything from collecting tax revenue, to monitoring public safety programs and regulating the economy.
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  • How does the government borrow money?

    Q: How does the government borrow money?

    A: According to the U.S. Treasury Department, the U.S. government borrows money primarily through the issuance of U.S. Treasury bonds. Part of the bonds are open to the public; individuals, state governments, foreign governments and corporations can buy them. U.S. trust funds with surpluses, such as Social Security, purchase non-marketable bonds, so the U.S. Treasury receives funds to pay its bills but cannot sell the bond on the marketplace.
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  • Which Sesame Street character testified in front of Congress?

    Q: Which Sesame Street character testified in front of Congress?

    A: Celebrities have been known to testify in front of Congress for causes they care about, but only one of those celebrities was a red, fuzzy monster. In 2002, Elmo, a beloved resident of Sesame Street, met with Congress to discuss more funding for music programs in schools.
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  • How often is the State of the Union address given?

    Q: How often is the State of the Union address given?

    A: The State of the Union address is mandated by the Constitution and given once per year, in early January. Prior to 1934, the State of the Union address was given in December, but that changed when the opening of Congress moved from March to January.
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  • What does the Department of Labor do?

    Q: What does the Department of Labor do?

    A: According to its mission statement, the U.S. Department of Labor exists to "foster, promote and develop the welfare" of workers, those seeking employment and those who are retired. The Department of Labor is committed to doing this through the improvement of working conditions, creating work opportunities and overseeing the administration of workers' rights laws.
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  • What led to the rise of political parties in the 1790's?

    Q: What led to the rise of political parties in the 1790's?

    A: The rise of political parties in the 1790's was largely the result of the formation of groups with opposing views about the structure of government. The first two groups were the Federalists, who supported a loose interpretation of the Constitution and a strong central government, and the Republicans, who supported the opposite. These two groups became the first "political parties."
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  • Do judges make law?

    Q: Do judges make law?

    A: Judges are not responsible for making laws. Judges are responsible for interpreting laws, assessing any evidence presented and imposing penalties while remaining impartial in their rulings to ensure justice is fairly served.
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  • What is the difference between federal and state governments?

    Q: What is the difference between federal and state governments?

    A: The federal government, under the powers of the U.S. Constitution, is given the power to make laws, veto laws, oversee foreign policy and national defense, impose tariffs, impeach officials, enter into treaties, interpret the Constitution, interpret laws and revise laws that allow one state to impede on the rights of another. Beyond that, the 10th amendment gives power to the states to govern themselves.
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  • How many terms can a mayor serve?

    Q: How many terms can a mayor serve?

    A: The number of terms a mayor can serve depends on the particular laws of the mayor's city. According to the National League of Cities, only 9 percent of cities limit a mayor's terms in office, and of that 9 percent, 55 percent of cities have a two-term limit, 30 percent allow three terms and 9 percent permit four terms.
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  • What are the express powers of Congress?

    Q: What are the express powers of Congress?

    A: The express powers of Congress are those powers granted specifically in the United States Constitution, which include the ability to make laws, amend the Constitution and declare war. Additionally, Congress is also responsible for the United States Postal Service. The House of Representatives also has ability to initiate tax laws and call for the impeachment of government officials. The Senate approves all Presidential appointments and tries government officials for impeachment.
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  • Why was the 18th Amendment important?

    Q: Why was the 18th Amendment important?

    A: The 18th Amendment, which began the Prohibition era with the outlawing of alcohol, opened the doors to organized crime during the 1920s, overwhelming law enforcement prior to the amendment's repeal in 1933. This was the only American constitutional amendment to be repealed in its entirety.
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  • How many votes does Congress need to override a veto?

    Q: How many votes does Congress need to override a veto?

    A: A two-thirds majority vote in both the House of Representatives and in the Senate is required to override a presidential veto. The exact number depends on how many representatives vote; therefore, the actual number is subject to change.
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  • What is the main purpose of the Bill of Rights?

    Q: What is the main purpose of the Bill of Rights?

    A: The main purpose of the U.S. Bill of Rights is to define the civil liberties of American citizens. It refers to the first 10 amendments of the U.S. Constitution, and it was introduced in 1789 to guarantee the protection of the basic rights that citizens continue to enjoy.
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  • Who serves as president of the Senate in the vice president's absence?

    Q: Who serves as president of the Senate in the vice president's absence?

    A: The president pro tempore is the senatorial official who serves as president of the Senate when the vice president is absent. President pro tempore means "president for a time."
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  • What is a summary of the 13th amendment to the Constitution?

    Q: What is a summary of the 13th amendment to the Constitution?

    A: The 13th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution pertains to the abolition of slavery and involuntary servitude. It was adopted on Dec. 6, 1865, as part of a suite of amendments passed in response to the Civil War, regarding civil rights and black suffrage.
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