US Government

A:

A national budget is the proposal of revenues and expenditures a government expects for a given fiscal year. It is much like any budget in that it estimates necessary spending against necessary income, only on a much larger scale.

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  • What led to the rise of political parties in the 1790's?

    Q: What led to the rise of political parties in the 1790's?

    A: The rise of political parties in the 1790's was largely the result of the formation of groups with opposing views about the structure of government. The first two groups were the Federalists, who supported a loose interpretation of the Constitution and a strong central government, and the Republicans, who supported the opposite. These two groups became the first "political parties."
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  • What are the rules for flying the American flag?

    Q: What are the rules for flying the American flag?

    A: Rules for flying the American Flag fall under several categories: the folding and unfolding of the flag, the method of display, the definition of a flag and flag proportions. All flags must meet the United States Flag Code.
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  • What is a national budget?

    Q: What is a national budget?

    A: A national budget is the proposal of revenues and expenditures a government expects for a given fiscal year. It is much like any budget in that it estimates necessary spending against necessary income, only on a much larger scale.
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  • When will the 1950 U.S. Federal Census be available online?

    Q: When will the 1950 U.S. Federal Census be available online?

    A: According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the records from the 1950 Census are scheduled for release on April 1, 2022. Records from the U.S. Census are not made publicly accessible until 72 years after the census of population and housing has taken place.
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  • Is there gold in Fort Knox?

    Q: Is there gold in Fort Knox?

    A: Fort Knox has been the site of the United States Bullion Depository since 1937, and it contains approximately 3 percent of all the gold that has ever been refined. At various times, the depository has held other valuable items, but gold remains its main holding.
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  • How does the government borrow money?

    Q: How does the government borrow money?

    A: According to the U.S. Treasury Department, the U.S. government borrows money primarily through the issuance of U.S. Treasury bonds. Part of the bonds are open to the public; individuals, state governments, foreign governments and corporations can buy them. U.S. trust funds with surpluses, such as Social Security, purchase non-marketable bonds, so the U.S. Treasury receives funds to pay its bills but cannot sell the bond on the marketplace.
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  • Which Sesame Street character testified in front of Congress?

    Q: Which Sesame Street character testified in front of Congress?

    A: Celebrities have been known to testify in front of Congress for causes they care about, but only one of those celebrities was a red, fuzzy monster. In 2002, Elmo, a beloved resident of Sesame Street, met with Congress to discuss more funding for music programs in schools.
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  • What is federal bureaucracy?

    Q: What is federal bureaucracy?

    A: Federal bureaucracy refers to the organization of government offices that implement public policy. Highly complex societies require federal bureaucracy to manage public programs and ensure the enforcement of legislation. The bureaucracy controls everything from collecting tax revenue, to monitoring public safety programs and regulating the economy.
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  • How often is the State of the Union address given?

    Q: How often is the State of the Union address given?

    A: The State of the Union address is mandated by the Constitution and given once per year, in early January. Prior to 1934, the State of the Union address was given in December, but that changed when the opening of Congress moved from March to January.
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  • What are the duties of Congress?

    Q: What are the duties of Congress?

    A: Congress has many duties, including collecting taxes, paying the country's debt and providing for the safety of its citizens. Congress is also responsible for making laws.
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  • What does the Department of Labor do?

    Q: What does the Department of Labor do?

    A: According to its mission statement, the U.S. Department of Labor exists to "foster, promote and develop the welfare" of workers, those seeking employment and those who are retired. The Department of Labor is committed to doing this through the improvement of working conditions, creating work opportunities and overseeing the administration of workers' rights laws.
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  • How do you receive a Congressional Medal of Honor?

    Q: How do you receive a Congressional Medal of Honor?

    A: The process for receiving the Medal of Honor, often inaccurately referred to as the Congressional Medal of Honor, is intricate. First, the individual must exhibit an extraordinary act of valor in combat. After this deed is witnessed, the recommendation for the award is passed up a chain of responsible persons culminating with the president. If the soldier, sailor or marine gains approval, the president awards the medal personally.
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  • Who wrote the 24th Amendment?

    Q: Who wrote the 24th Amendment?

    A: The 24th Amendment to the United States Constitution was written by Congress at large, not by an individual author. It was proposed on August 27, 1962 and ratified on January 23, 1964.
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  • What is the job description of a majority whip?

    Q: What is the job description of a majority whip?

    A: In a legislative body, a majority whip is a member of the dominant political party whose task it is to keep voting members in line with the party's goals and ideologies. About.com expert Robert Longley explains that the majority whip ensures attendance at all important votes and legislative sessions. This official also has the authority to reward and punish members for their compliance or lack thereof.
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  • What are the express powers of Congress?

    Q: What are the express powers of Congress?

    A: The express powers of Congress are those powers granted specifically in the United States Constitution, which include the ability to make laws, amend the Constitution and declare war. Additionally, Congress is also responsible for the United States Postal Service. The House of Representatives also has ability to initiate tax laws and call for the impeachment of government officials. The Senate approves all Presidential appointments and tries government officials for impeachment.
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  • Why is the Fifth Amendment important?

    Q: Why is the Fifth Amendment important?

    A: The Fifth Amendment is important because it specifies legal safeguards for the criminally accused that are designed to protect citizens' life, liberty and property. Among these safeguards are protection against multiple trials for the same crime and the right to refrain from presenting self-incriminating testimony.
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  • Why did the Child Labor Amendment fail?

    Q: Why did the Child Labor Amendment fail?

    A: The Child Labor Amendment failed because it did not meet the requisite number of states for ratification. Passage required 38 states, but it stalled at 28, notes Mental Floss.
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  • What is a summary of the 25th Amendment?

    Q: What is a summary of the 25th Amendment?

    A: The 25th Amendment outlines the rules of succession to the U.S. Presidency and Vice Presidency in the event of either or both of them dying, withdrawing or being removed from office. It was certified on February 23, 1967, by President Lyndon Johnson.
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  • What are the president's advisors called?

    Q: What are the president's advisors called?

    A: The President's advisors are known as the Cabinet. The role of the Cabinet is to advise the president on subjects related to the duties of each member's office.
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  • What did the delegates agree to at the Philadelphia Convention?

    Q: What did the delegates agree to at the Philadelphia Convention?

    A: The Constitutional Convention of 1787 in Philadelphia, also known as the Philadelphia Convention, agreed to terms that established the powers of Congress and rules regarding representation that are presently enacted. The Constitutional Convention of 1787 gave Congress the power to regulate the economy, the national defense system and the currency. The Philadelphia Convention also established the rules that dictated the representation each state would receive in the Congress.
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  • What are the strengths and weaknesses of the Constitution?

    Q: What are the strengths and weaknesses of the Constitution?

    A: The United States Constitution provides the foundation for a strong central government with authority to regulate interstate disputes and commerce, enforce citizens' rights and defend from hostile forces. However, much of it is too vague to provide definitive interpretations. It can be amended, but the process is slow. Citizens vote for representatives directly but don't get a direct vote on policies. There is no way to address bipartisanship.
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