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While all municipalities are different with regards to how far back their records go, nearly every city or county maintains some record of the blueprints used for buildings and homes in the area. Many of these documents can be obtained online, but the majority are too old to have electronic versions available.

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  • What Is the National Reclamation Act?

    Q: What Is the National Reclamation Act?

    A: The National Reclamation Act of 1902, also known as the Newlands Reclamation Act, allowed the federal government to commission and fund water irrigation projects, according to the National Archives. The law stemmed from arid conditions in the western states. Under the law, funding for the projects came from the sale of public land.
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  • What Is the Penalty for Slashing a Car's Tires?

    Q: What Is the Penalty for Slashing a Car's Tires?

    A: Slashing car tires falls under the legal designation of criminal mischief, according to Pennsylvania attorney Jason R. Antoine. Each state has its own penalties, which commonly include monetary damages, probation or jail time. Antoine also notes that criminal mischief penalties correlate with the dollar value associated with the damaged caused by the defendant.
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  • What Is the Democratic Process?

    Q: What Is the Democratic Process?

    A: A democratic process is a practice that allows democracy to exist. Democracy is based on the idea that everyone should have equal rights and be allowed to participate in making important decisions. It is a form of government in which all eligible citizens are allowed equal participation, either directly (through elected leaders) or indirectly (in the proposal, development and establishment of laws that run the society).
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  • How Much Beer Can I Bring Into Canada?

    Q: How Much Beer Can I Bring Into Canada?

    A: Both Canadian residents and non-Canadian visitors to Canada may bring up to 8.5 liters of beer into Canada. In normal 355-milliliter cans or bottles of beer, this equals 24 servings.
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  • Can I Evict Someone Living in My Home?

    Q: Can I Evict Someone Living in My Home?

    A: LawNY explains that evicting someone from a private residence is a complicated legal issue that must be handled carefully. In order to evict, you must be the person in legal possession of the home and you must give sufficient notice for the other person to vacate the premises.
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  • How Do You Write a Letter to Someone in Jail?

    Q: How Do You Write a Letter to Someone in Jail?

    A: In order to write a letter to someone in jail, one must know the inmate's full name, his housing unit and his booking number at the detention facility in which he is housed. Upon constructing the letter, one should keep in mind that all letters are scanned for issues regarding security and safety. Letters are also inspected for contraband.
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  • What Is a Lie of Omission?

    Q: What Is a Lie of Omission?

    A: A lie of omission is a lie in which someone deliberately withholds pertinent details about something in order to skew someone else's idea of the truth or engender a misconception. Although a lie of omission is not technically a lie because it contains no false information, it is still referred to as one colloquially because it is deliberately misleading.
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  • What Is the Difference Between Power and Authority?

    Q: What Is the Difference Between Power and Authority?

    A: Authority involves the duties that are delegated to an individual while power is the possession of control that allows an individual to influence the actions of others. Most individuals who are in positions of power often have some type of authority.
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  • How Is a Resolution Different From a Bill?

    Q: How Is a Resolution Different From a Bill?

    A: According to the U.S. Government Printing Office, joint resolutions typically address limited issues while bills often cover broader topics. They are essentially the same, however, because each must be passed by both houses of Congress and signed by the president.
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  • Can You Marry the Same Person Twice Without a Divorce?

    Q: Can You Marry the Same Person Twice Without a Divorce?

    A: It is not possible to marry the same person twice without a divorce. When people are legally married with an issued marriage license that's been signed, they cannot get married again.
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  • What Is the Purpose of Swearing in a Witness?

    Q: What Is the Purpose of Swearing in a Witness?

    A: The purpose of swearing in a witness during a legal proceeding is to ensure the witness is telling the truth to the best of his ability. Statements made by witnesses while under oath are presumed to be truthful, and verdicts rendered by judges and juries often rely on witness testimony. If a witness knowingly lies while testifying under oath, the witness risks being charged with the crime of perjury.
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  • How Long After an Eviction Do I Have to Move?

    Q: How Long After an Eviction Do I Have to Move?

    A: Tenants who have been served with an eviction notice typically have at least several days to move out, according to Nolo. Although eviction laws vary by state, law enforcement officers usually give notice that they will be back in a few days to escort evicted tenants from a rental property.
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  • Why Is the Constitution Important?

    Q: Why Is the Constitution Important?

    A: The Constitution is important because it protects individual freedom, and its fundamental principles govern the United States. The Constitution places the government’s power in the hands of the citizens. It limits the power of the government and establishes a system of checks and balances. It is also the framework for the freedoms that are granted to each American.
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  • Can I Legally Protest My Employee Work Schedule?

    Q: Can I Legally Protest My Employee Work Schedule?

    A: All employee work schedules must follow the guidelines of the Fair Labor Standards Act. Government and private sector employees whose schedules are prohibited by the FLSA can file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Labor's Wage and Hour Division, according to the department's website.
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  • How Does International Law Differ From National Law?

    Q: How Does International Law Differ From National Law?

    A: International law differs from national law in its aims, subjects, boundaries and deliberative bodies. National law is concerned with running a particular country and promoting the interests of its people. International law promotes the welfare of the entire international community, and has to respect the sovereignty of states.
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  • What Are Some Cultural Diversity Issues in Criminal Justice?

    Q: What Are Some Cultural Diversity Issues in Criminal Justice?

    A: The most prominent cultural diversity issue in American criminal justice is the perception of and concomitant attempts to prevent racially biased policing. Tensions between law enforcement officers and minorities have caused agencies to seek measures designed to reform police-community relations. Furthermore, cultural norms in legal matters differ. Following the course of action that would be expected in one country can lead to being arrested in the United States.
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  • What States Have Banned Pit Bulls?

    Q: What States Have Banned Pit Bulls?

    A: As of September 2014, no states have enacted breed-specific laws, or BSLs, banning pit bulls. However, there are over 700 U.S. cities in 40 states that have enacted these bans. Additionally, appellate courts in 12 states have upheld the constitutionality of breed-specific pit bull laws, including Arkansas, Colorado, Florida, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, New Mexico, Ohio, Utah, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin and Washington, D.C.
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  • How Late Can Telemarketers Call?

    Q: How Late Can Telemarketers Call?

    A: According to the Federal Trade Commission, telemarketers are allowed to make calls as late as 9 p.m. Calls from telemarketers are allowed to begin as early as 8 a.m.
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  • What Are Some of the Arguments Against the Death Penalty?

    Q: What Are Some of the Arguments Against the Death Penalty?

    A: The death penalty violates the constitution, is a waste of taxpayer’s money and is usually applied in an unfair and unjust manner depending on who a person is and where they come from, according to the American Civil Liberties Union. The ACLU reports that more than 140 innocent people have died under the death penalty in the United States since 1973.
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  • What Is It Called When a Child Divorces His Parents?

    Q: What Is It Called When a Child Divorces His Parents?

    A: When a child divorces his parents, it is called the emancipation of a minor. Emancipation laws in all 50 states allow a child, under specific circumstances, to become legally separated from his parents.
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  • What Kind of Lawyer Should You Contact About a Dog Bite Case?

    Q: What Kind of Lawyer Should You Contact About a Dog Bite Case?

    A: An individual who is injured by a dog bite should contact a personal injury lawyer. This type of lawyer provides representation to people who have been either physically or psychologically injured by the action or inaction of another, according to the Legal Information Institute.
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