Law

A:

The number one rule for driving in bad weather conditions is to slow down. The vehicle needs more time to come to a halt when a person is driving in bad weather conditions due to wet roads and low visibility.

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  • What kind of lawyer should you contact about a dog bite case?

    Q: What kind of lawyer should you contact about a dog bite case?

    A: An individual who is injured by a dog bite should contact a personal injury lawyer. This type of lawyer provides representation to people who have been either physically or psychologically injured by the action or inaction of another, according to the Legal Information Institute.
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  • Can I legally protest my employee work schedule?

    Q: Can I legally protest my employee work schedule?

    A: All employee work schedules must follow the guidelines of the Fair Labor Standards Act. Government and private sector employees whose schedules are prohibited by the FLSA can file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Labor's Wage and Hour Division, according to the department's website.
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  • What states sell grain alcohol?

    Q: What states sell grain alcohol?

    A: Pure grain alcohol can be purchased in a majority of states. The states that prohibit the sale of grain alcohol include California, Florida, Hawaii, Iowa, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Nevada, New Hampshire, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Virginia, Washington and West Virginia, according to The Washington Post and The Badger Herald.
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  • How do you get rid of a warrant?

    Q: How do you get rid of a warrant?

    A: LegalMatch states that there are typically three ways to resolve an arrest warrant: paying bail or the existing court balance, appearing in court or turning oneself in to authorities. The type of warrant and severity of the crime for which it was issued determine which method of settling a warrant works best.
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  • What is the definition of defamatory speech?

    Q: What is the definition of defamatory speech?

    A: Defamatory speech is any false, publicly spoken statement that harms the reputation of another person, group of people or organization. Another term for defamatory speech is slander.
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  • What states have banned pit bulls?

    Q: What states have banned pit bulls?

    A: No states have enacted breed-specific laws, or BSLs, banning pit bulls. However, there are over 700 U.S. cities in 40 states that have enacted these bans. Additionally, appellate courts in 12 states have upheld the constitutionality of breed-specific pit bull laws, including Arkansas, Colorado, Florida, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, New Mexico, Ohio, Utah, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin and Washington, D.C.
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  • How does the U.S. Patriot Act work?

    Q: How does the U.S. Patriot Act work?

    A: The Uniting and Strengthening America by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism Act of 2001 (the USA PATRIOT Act) is a law passed by congress and signed by then President George W. Bush which grants law enforcement and national security officials additional resources and abilities to be used in the investigation and prosecution of terrorism suspects. Several provisions of the act were renewed by President Obama.
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  • What is the penalty for slashing a car's tires?

    Q: What is the penalty for slashing a car's tires?

    A: Slashing car tires falls under the legal designation of criminal mischief, according to Pennsylvania attorney Jason R. Antoine. Each state has its own penalties, which commonly include monetary damages, probation or jail time. Antoine also notes that criminal mischief penalties correlate with the dollar value associated with the damaged caused by the defendant.
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  • Can you leave the country while on probation?

    Q: Can you leave the country while on probation?

    A: According to the Law Offices of Powers Sellers & Finkelstein, it is possible to leave the country while on probation if permission is attained from a parole officer. The parole officer takes several things into account, such as the parolee's business abroad and the crime for which he was sentenced.
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  • How is a resolution different from a bill?

    Q: How is a resolution different from a bill?

    A: According to the U.S. Government Printing Office, joint resolutions typically address limited issues while bills often cover broader topics. They are essentially the same, however, because each must be passed by both houses of Congress and signed by the president.
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  • What are some cultural diversity issues in criminal justice?

    Q: What are some cultural diversity issues in criminal justice?

    A: The most prominent cultural diversity issue in American criminal justice is the perception of and concomitant attempts to prevent racially biased policing. Tensions between law enforcement officers and minorities have caused agencies to seek measures designed to reform police-community relations. Furthermore, cultural norms in legal matters differ. Following the course of action that would be expected in one country can lead to being arrested in the United States.
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  • What is it called when a child divorces his parents?

    Q: What is it called when a child divorces his parents?

    A: When a child divorces his parents, it is called the emancipation of a minor. Emancipation laws in all 50 states allow a child, under specific circumstances, to become legally separated from his parents.
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  • What is the purpose of affirmative action?

    Q: What is the purpose of affirmative action?

    A: The purpose of affirmative action is to correct past injustices by implementing policies that favor those previously discriminated against. The term was first coined after its inclusion in an executive order signed by United States President John F. Kennedy.
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  • What is the importance of laws in society?

    Q: What is the importance of laws in society?

    A: Laws are in place to protect people against harm, according to civil liberties expert Tom Head for About.com. Societal rules also prevent vulnerable people from being exploited, and laws safeguard personal property. Laws also exist for granting goods and services to citizens.
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  • Why is Lady Justice blindfolded?

    Q: Why is Lady Justice blindfolded?

    A: According to Reference.com, Lady Justice is blindfolded to represent her impartiality in matters of justice and the law. Her statue is also referred to as Blind Justice and the Scales of Justice.
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  • How late can telemarketers call?

    Q: How late can telemarketers call?

    A: According to the Federal Trade Commission, telemarketers are allowed to make calls as late as 9 p.m. Calls from telemarketers are allowed to begin as early as 8 a.m.
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  • What happens to confiscated drug money?

    Q: What happens to confiscated drug money?

    A: Under federal law and according to the law in many states, law enforcement officials are permitted to keep drug money seized during raids to supplement their departments' revenues. When multiple departments work together on a raid, each is awarded a percentage of the money seized. This applies to the FBI as well as state, county and city police.
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  • What is a lie of omission?

    Q: What is a lie of omission?

    A: A lie of omission is a lie in which someone deliberately withholds pertinent details about something in order to skew someone else's idea of the truth or engender a misconception. Although a lie of omission is not technically a lie because it contains no false information, it is still referred to as one colloquially because it is deliberately misleading.
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  • What are the different degrees of assault?

    Q: What are the different degrees of assault?

    A: According to criminal defense attorney Bobby G. Frederick, assault and battery charges are divided into three separate categories: third degree, second degree and first degree. The difference in all three is the degree to which one person invades the personal space, or injures, another person. Third degree is mild in nature, second degree is moderate and first is the most serious.
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  • Who has the right-of-way in a parking lot?

    Q: Who has the right-of-way in a parking lot?

    A: According to Nolo, determining the right of way in a parking lot depends on the situation. If a car is backing out of a parking space and hits a car driving down the parking lane, the accident is the fault of the driver who is backing out.
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  • Can you go to the DMV to get your ID if you have a warrant?

    Q: Can you go to the DMV to get your ID if you have a warrant?

    A: Laws vary by state regarding getting ID at the DMV with an outstanding warrant. Though the DMV is not a law enforcement agency, some states do check for warrants when issuing ID and will hold violators for arrest or arrest on the spot if a state trooper is present.
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