Law

A:

All employee work schedules must follow the guidelines of the Fair Labor Standards Act. Government and private sector employees whose schedules are prohibited by the FLSA can file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Labor's Wage and Hour Division, according to the department's website.

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  • How do I find out if a divorce is final?

    Q: How do I find out if a divorce is final?

    A: There are multiple ways to find out if a divorce has been finalized. You can call the county courthouse in which it was filed in, if you are a party in the divorce you will receive notification via U.S. Postal Service, or you can contact your attorney.
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  • When did legalism begin?

    Q: When did legalism begin?

    A: Legalism began during the Warring States era of China, between 475 and 221 B.C., according to Encyclopedia Britannica. Because of the conflicting, chaotic nature of this period, the utilitarian precepts of legalism caught on with the ruling class of the Qin Dynasty.
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  • What states sell grain alcohol?

    Q: What states sell grain alcohol?

    A: Pure grain alcohol can be purchased in a majority of states. The states that prohibit the sale of grain alcohol include California, Florida, Hawaii, Iowa, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Nevada, New Hampshire, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Virginia, Washington and West Virginia, according to The Washington Post and The Badger Herald.
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  • Can a private citizen sue the President?

    Q: Can a private citizen sue the President?

    A: A private citizen may sue the President over alleged actions undertaken before or independently of the Presidential office. When the President acts on the authority of his office in any way, he is shielded by the doctrines of immunity.
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  • How long can a U.S. citizen stay in the Philippines?

    Q: How long can a U.S. citizen stay in the Philippines?

    A: According to the U.S. Embassy in Manila, a U.S. citizen can stay in the Philippines for 30 days without a visa, provided that the citizen has a valid return ticket and passport. For a passport to be valid, it must be good for six months after the anticipated return date. If a passport expires June 30, 2015, the passport holder would need to leave the Philippines by Dec. 31, 2014.
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  • Can I legally protest my employee work schedule?

    Q: Can I legally protest my employee work schedule?

    A: All employee work schedules must follow the guidelines of the Fair Labor Standards Act. Government and private sector employees whose schedules are prohibited by the FLSA can file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Labor's Wage and Hour Division, according to the department's website.
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  • How is a resolution different from a bill?

    Q: How is a resolution different from a bill?

    A: According to the U.S. Government Printing Office, joint resolutions typically address limited issues while bills often cover broader topics. They are essentially the same, however, because each must be passed by both houses of Congress and signed by the president.
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  • Why is Lady Justice blindfolded?

    Q: Why is Lady Justice blindfolded?

    A: According to Reference.com, Lady Justice is blindfolded to represent her impartiality in matters of justice and the law. Her statue is also referred to as Blind Justice and the Scales of Justice.
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  • Who has the right-of-way in a parking lot?

    Q: Who has the right-of-way in a parking lot?

    A: According to Nolo, determining the right of way in a parking lot depends on the situation. If a car is backing out of a parking space and hits a car driving down the parking lane, the accident is the fault of the driver who is backing out.
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  • Can an employer require a doctor's note?

    Q: Can an employer require a doctor's note?

    A: An employer can require a doctor's note if one of its employees is taking a sick day, but the policy must be enforced uniformly. Additionally, the note must not be required to contain any private information about the employee's diagnosis.
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  • What is the purpose of a sample character reference letter for court?

    Q: What is the purpose of a sample character reference letter for court?

    A: The purpose of a sample character reference letter for court is to highlight the positive traits and behavior of someone who stands accused of committing a crime. Character reference letters are most often written by the defendant's friends, family members and acquaintances. Character references need to be written by people who have known the defendant for a significant amount of time and have not been accused or convicted of breaking the law.
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  • What makes a verbal agreement legally binding?

    Q: What makes a verbal agreement legally binding?

    A: There must be an offer and acceptance to create a legally binding contract, according to Nolo. In addition, because of the verbal nature of a contract, the agreement must fall outside of the statute of frauds, notes Professor Richard Warner for the Chicago-Kent College of Law.
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  • Why is it important to obey the law?

    Q: Why is it important to obey the law?

    A: According to The Judicial Learning Center, law is a crucial system that allows human society to function in a manner that is as safe, fair and profitable for as many people as possible. Obeying the law is not only beneficial to society as a whole, but it allows individuals to reap the protections of living in an orderly environment.
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  • What is a judge's salary?

    Q: What is a judge's salary?

    A: According to the 2012 U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, a judge makes an average annual salary of $102,980, or $49.51 per hour. A judge's salary varies based upon geographic location, education, experience and legal sector.
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  • What is the relationship between law and morality?

    Q: What is the relationship between law and morality?

    A: Morality serves as the ethical basis or justification for law and facilitates obedience to the law by fomenting habits of conduct. Western Kentucky University explains that morality precedes law and is necessary for law to be successful.
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  • How many U.S. Supreme Court justices must agree to hear a case?

    Q: How many U.S. Supreme Court justices must agree to hear a case?

    A: Four of the nine members of the U.S. Supreme Court must agree to hear a particular case. When the justices of the U.S. Supreme Court agree to hear a case, they technically are granting what is called a writ of certiorari.
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  • What is the penalty for slashing a car's tires?

    Q: What is the penalty for slashing a car's tires?

    A: Slashing car tires falls under the legal designation of criminal mischief, according to Pennsylvania attorney Jason R. Antoine. Each state has its own penalties, which commonly include monetary damages, probation or jail time. Antoine also notes that criminal mischief penalties correlate with the dollar value associated with the damaged caused by the defendant.
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  • What is the purpose of swearing in a witness?

    Q: What is the purpose of swearing in a witness?

    A: The purpose of swearing in a witness during a legal proceeding is to ensure the witness is telling the truth to the best of his ability. Statements made by witnesses while under oath are presumed to be truthful, and verdicts rendered by judges and juries often rely on witness testimony. If a witness knowingly lies while testifying under oath, the witness risks being charged with the crime of perjury.
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  • What is considered legal separation in Georgia?

    Q: What is considered legal separation in Georgia?

    A: A legal separation in Georgia, as in many other states, is a legal condition in which spouses live apart but in which there is no formal or judicial end to their marriage. In Georgia, the technical language does not include reference to "legal separation." Instead, according to Stearns-Montgomery & Proctor, it is formally called a "separate maintenance action."
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  • What can happen to you if you hit a car and run?

    Q: What can happen to you if you hit a car and run?

    A: A person can be charged with a misdemeanor or felony hit and run if that person leaves the scene of an accident, according to LegalMatch. Penalties include imprisonment, fines and parole. The victim of a hit and run can also sue for monetary compensation from the accident's perpetrator. Wikipedia notes that a driver's license can be suspended or revoked, and insurance companies may cancel the driver's policy.
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  • What is the curfew for 15 year olds?

    Q: What is the curfew for 15 year olds?

    A: Teen curfews vary according to local laws in different cities. Parents also often enforce specific curfews for their children that do not depend on laws but on their own home rules instead.
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