Law

A:

All employee work schedules must follow the guidelines of the Fair Labor Standards Act. Government and private sector employees whose schedules are prohibited by the FLSA can file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Labor's Wage and Hour Division, according to the department's website.

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  • What is the penalty for slashing a car's tires?

    Q: What is the penalty for slashing a car's tires?

    A: Slashing car tires falls under the legal designation of criminal mischief, according to Pennsylvania attorney Jason R. Antoine. Each state has its own penalties, which commonly include monetary damages, probation or jail time. Antoine also notes that criminal mischief penalties correlate with the dollar value associated with the damaged caused by the defendant.
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  • Are there any states where it is legal to have a pet raccoon?

    Q: Are there any states where it is legal to have a pet raccoon?

    A: Of the 50 states in America, 29 states do allow people to keep pet raccoons. Each state has its own laws regarding owning raccoons, and persons interested in doing so must meet the indicated requirements for the state in which they live.
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  • What is the definition of defamatory speech?

    Q: What is the definition of defamatory speech?

    A: Defamatory speech is any false, publicly spoken statement that harms the reputation of another person, group of people or organization. Another term for defamatory speech is slander.
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  • What is the difference between criminal law and civil law?

    Q: What is the difference between criminal law and civil law?

    A: State or federal government bring criminal actions against parties that are accused of violating the law and civil actions are non-criminal acts brought against those accused of violating private rights. Examples of criminal law include murder, kidnapping, embezzlement or theft. Civil law examples include breach of contract, compensation-related cases and fraud.
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  • Can I evict someone living in my home?

    Q: Can I evict someone living in my home?

    A: LawNY explains that evicting someone from a private residence is a complicated legal issue that must be handled carefully. In order to evict, you must be the person in legal possession of the home and you must give sufficient notice for the other person to vacate the premises.
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  • What are FAA regulations about liquids?

    Q: What are FAA regulations about liquids?

    A: The FAA and TSA limit liquids in carry-on bags for airline passengers to 3.4 ounces of each liquid, with all liquid containers able to be stored in one quart-sized, clear, zip-top bag. The clear bag must be placed in the appropriate screening bin, separate from any carry-on luggage. Medications, baby formula, breast milk and baby food are permitted beyond the 3.4-ounce limit, within reasonable quantities.
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  • What is the curfew for 15 year olds?

    Q: What is the curfew for 15 year olds?

    A: Teen curfews vary according to local laws in different cities. Parents also often enforce specific curfews for their children that do not depend on laws but on their own home rules instead.
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  • What are the main functions of a trade union?

    Q: What are the main functions of a trade union?

    A: The primary functions of a trade union are to protect, defend and support the common interests of members by acting as a mediator between workers and the organizations for whom they work. The first trade union in the United States was organized in 1794 in Philadelphia by a group of shoemakers. The purpose was to establish a common wage system in order to prevent employers and unskilled workers from undercutting members.
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  • What is the basic premise of the National Response Framework?

    Q: What is the basic premise of the National Response Framework?

    A: According to the U.S. Army Combined Arms Center, the basic premise of the National Response Framework is that emergencies should be handled at the most local level possible. Typically local and state resources are sufficient for immediate emergency response as well as incident management, often through states' emergency management agencies.
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  • Can a private citizen sue the President?

    Q: Can a private citizen sue the President?

    A: A private citizen may sue the President over alleged actions undertaken before or independently of the Presidential office. When the President acts on the authority of his office in any way, he is shielded by the doctrines of immunity.
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  • How should one proceed if a spouse won't sign divorce papers?

    Q: How should one proceed if a spouse won't sign divorce papers?

    A: Should a spouse refuse to sign divorce papers, it is still possible to proceed with the divorce by filing legal paperwork as a single petitioner. According to LegalZoom, a spouse's signature is only necessary if both parties are agreeing to the divorce petition by filing jointly. Alternatively, one spouse can obtain a legal complaint for divorce (not the joint version), fill it out and file it.
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  • What is the relationship between law and morality?

    Q: What is the relationship between law and morality?

    A: Morality serves as the ethical basis or justification for law and facilitates obedience to the law by fomenting habits of conduct. Western Kentucky University explains that morality precedes law and is necessary for law to be successful.
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  • Can I legally protest my employee work schedule?

    Q: Can I legally protest my employee work schedule?

    A: All employee work schedules must follow the guidelines of the Fair Labor Standards Act. Government and private sector employees whose schedules are prohibited by the FLSA can file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Labor's Wage and Hour Division, according to the department's website.
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  • What makes a verbal agreement legally binding?

    Q: What makes a verbal agreement legally binding?

    A: There must be an offer and acceptance to create a legally binding contract, according to Nolo. In addition, because of the verbal nature of a contract, the agreement must fall outside of the statute of frauds, notes Professor Richard Warner for the Chicago-Kent College of Law.
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  • How late can telemarketers call?

    Q: How late can telemarketers call?

    A: According to the Federal Trade Commission, telemarketers are allowed to make calls as late as 9 p.m. Calls from telemarketers are allowed to begin as early as 8 a.m.
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  • What is the law if my dog bites another dog?

    Q: What is the law if my dog bites another dog?

    A: Laws on pet liability depend on a number of factors including violations of animal control laws, negligence and specific provisions of state, county and municipal laws where the incident took place, according to attorney Kenneth Morgan Phillips, the top dog bite lawyer. A dog owner can be held accountable for his dog's actions if the owner failed to take proper precautions or does something unreasonable with the animal.
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  • What is the democratic process?

    Q: What is the democratic process?

    A: A democratic process is a practice that allows democracy to exist. Democracy is based on the idea that everyone should have equal rights and be allowed to participate in making important decisions. It is a form of government in which all eligible citizens are allowed equal participation, either directly (through elected leaders) or indirectly (in the proposal, development and establishment of laws that run the society).
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  • What do the scales of justice stand for?

    Q: What do the scales of justice stand for?

    A: The scales of justice stand for the idea of balancing truth and fairness in the justice system. In ancient Greek mythology, the scales of justice represent divine justice.
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  • Why is it called jaywalking?

    Q: Why is it called jaywalking?

    A: The term jaywalking originates from the word "jay". Contrary to popular belief, this is not the shape of the path the person makes. Instead, jay was the name given to people that were considered simpletons or idiots.
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  • What are the pros and cons of government regulations?

    Q: What are the pros and cons of government regulations?

    A: According to the Library of Economics and Liberty, government regulations help avert market failures and improve unfairness within the system, but regulations also pose burdens upon businesses and individuals. Government regulations place limits on the freedom within which one operates; however, the goals of society deem such intervention necessary in some cases.
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  • Can you go to the DMV to get your ID if you have a warrant?

    Q: Can you go to the DMV to get your ID if you have a warrant?

    A: Laws vary by state regarding getting ID at the DMV with an outstanding warrant. Though the DMV is not a law enforcement agency, some states do check for warrants when issuing ID and will hold violators for arrest or arrest on the spot if a state trooper is present.
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