Law

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Graffiti is illegal because it is considered a form of vandalism or criminal mischief, according to Graffiti Hurts. Graffiti artwork is tagged on buildings without the owners' permission, amounting to destruction of private property. Depending on the state and the severity of the crime, graffiti penalties include fines, cleanup costs, driving license suspension or felony conviction.

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  • What Is the "no Trespassing Law" for Private Property?

    Q: What Is the "no Trespassing Law" for Private Property?

    A: According to the Legal Information Institute of Cornell University, trespassing is "defined by the act of knowingly entering another person’s property without permission." Trespassing law varies from place to place, but it generally contains similar elements in all of its manifestations.
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  • How Do You Get the Blueprints of an Existing Building?

    Q: How Do You Get the Blueprints of an Existing Building?

    A: While all municipalities are different with regards to how far back their records go, nearly every city or county maintains some record of the blueprints used for buildings and homes in the area. Many of these documents can be obtained online, but the majority are too old to have electronic versions available.
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  • What Is the Definition of Open Sky Policy?

    Q: What Is the Definition of Open Sky Policy?

    A: Open sky agreements between countries eliminate the use of government oversight in commercial air carrier services such as capacity and pricing, giving carriers the ability to provide convenient and affordable air service. These agreements give airlines the right to fly to all points on the globe to encourage airline globalization.
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  • How Do You Write a Letter to Someone in Jail?

    Q: How Do You Write a Letter to Someone in Jail?

    A: In order to write a letter to someone in jail, one must know the inmate's full name, his housing unit and his booking number at the detention facility in which he is housed. Upon constructing the letter, one should keep in mind that all letters are scanned for issues regarding security and safety. Letters are also inspected for contraband.
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  • How Do You Apply for a Hawaii Marriage License?

    Q: How Do You Apply for a Hawaii Marriage License?

    A: To apply for a Hawaiian marriage license, first select and hire a licensed performer such as a minister or judge to marry you, and then complete the marriage license application provided by the Hawaii Department of Health. You and your intended partner must take the application to a marriage license agent and submit it along with the license fee to receive a marriage license.
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  • What Are Some Cultural Diversity Issues in Criminal Justice?

    Q: What Are Some Cultural Diversity Issues in Criminal Justice?

    A: The most prominent cultural diversity issue in American criminal justice is the perception of and concomitant attempts to prevent racially biased policing. Tensions between law enforcement officers and minorities have caused agencies to seek measures designed to reform police-community relations. Furthermore, cultural norms in legal matters differ. Following the course of action that would be expected in one country can lead to being arrested in the United States.
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  • What Are the Different Degrees of Assault?

    Q: What Are the Different Degrees of Assault?

    A: According to criminal defense attorney Bobby G. Frederick, assault and battery charges are divided into three separate categories: third degree, second degree and first degree. The difference in all three is the degree to which one person invades the personal space, or injures, another person. Third degree is mild in nature, second degree is moderate and first is the most serious.
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  • Are Deaf People Allowed to Drive?

    Q: Are Deaf People Allowed to Drive?

    A: Deaf people can drive, but they may need to install a few adaptive modifications in their vehicles to be able to drive safely. Many deaf drivers utilize special devices to alert them when fire trucks or ambulances are near them.
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  • Can I Legally Protest My Employee Work Schedule?

    Q: Can I Legally Protest My Employee Work Schedule?

    A: All employee work schedules must follow the guidelines of the Fair Labor Standards Act. Government and private sector employees whose schedules are prohibited by the FLSA can file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Labor's Wage and Hour Division, according to the department's website.
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  • What Is a No Drop Policy on Domestic Violence?

    Q: What Is a No Drop Policy on Domestic Violence?

    A: A no-drop policy on domestic violence means that if a victim of domestic violence does not show up to court to testify against the defendant, the case is not dropped. Before no-drop policies were enacted in many areas, the result of a victim no-show meant a dismissal of the case.
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  • What Is the Purpose of Swearing in a Witness?

    Q: What Is the Purpose of Swearing in a Witness?

    A: The purpose of swearing in a witness during a legal proceeding is to ensure the witness is telling the truth to the best of his ability. Statements made by witnesses while under oath are presumed to be truthful, and verdicts rendered by judges and juries often rely on witness testimony. If a witness knowingly lies while testifying under oath, the witness risks being charged with the crime of perjury.
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  • What Are the Pros and Cons of Government Regulations?

    Q: What Are the Pros and Cons of Government Regulations?

    A: According to the Library of Economics and Liberty, government regulations help avert market failures and improve unfairness within the system, but regulations also pose burdens upon businesses and individuals. Government regulations place limits on the freedom within which one operates; however, the goals of society deem such intervention necessary in some cases.
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  • What Is the Curfew for 15 Year Olds?

    Q: What Is the Curfew for 15 Year Olds?

    A: Teen curfews vary according to local laws in different cities. Parents also often enforce specific curfews for their children that do not depend on laws but on their own home rules instead.
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  • What Happens to Confiscated Drug Money?

    Q: What Happens to Confiscated Drug Money?

    A: Under federal law and according to the law in many states, law enforcement officials are permitted to keep drug money seized during raids to supplement their departments' revenues. When multiple departments work together on a raid, each is awarded a percentage of the money seized. This applies to the FBI as well as state, county and city police.
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  • How Much Beer Can I Bring Into Canada?

    Q: How Much Beer Can I Bring Into Canada?

    A: Both Canadian residents and non-Canadian visitors to Canada may bring up to 8.5 liters of beer into Canada. In normal 355-milliliter cans or bottles of beer, this equals 24 servings.
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  • What Can Happen to You If You Hit a Car and Run?

    Q: What Can Happen to You If You Hit a Car and Run?

    A: A person can be charged with a misdemeanor or felony hit and run if that person leaves the scene of an accident, according to LegalMatch. Penalties include imprisonment, fines and parole. The victim of a hit and run can also sue for monetary compensation from the accident's perpetrator. Wikipedia notes that a driver's license can be suspended or revoked, and insurance companies may cancel the driver's policy.
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  • Can I Evict Someone Living in My Home?

    Q: Can I Evict Someone Living in My Home?

    A: LawNY explains that evicting someone from a private residence is a complicated legal issue that must be handled carefully. In order to evict, you must be the person in legal possession of the home and you must give sufficient notice for the other person to vacate the premises.
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  • What Is It Called When a Child Divorces His Parents?

    Q: What Is It Called When a Child Divorces His Parents?

    A: When a child divorces his parents, it is called the emancipation of a minor. Emancipation laws in all 50 states allow a child, under specific circumstances, to become legally separated from his parents.
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  • What States Sell Grain Alcohol?

    Q: What States Sell Grain Alcohol?

    A: Pure grain alcohol can be purchased in a majority of states. The states that prohibit the sale of grain alcohol include California, Florida, Hawaii, Iowa, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Nevada, New Hampshire, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Virginia, Washington and West Virginia, according to The Washington Post and The Badger Herald.
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  • Why Is It Called Jaywalking?

    Q: Why Is It Called Jaywalking?

    A: The term jaywalking originates from the word "jay". Contrary to popular belief, this is not the shape of the path the person makes. Instead, jay was the name given to people that were considered simpletons or idiots.
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  • What Is the Penalty for Slashing a Car's Tires?

    Q: What Is the Penalty for Slashing a Car's Tires?

    A: Slashing car tires falls under the legal designation of criminal mischief, according to Pennsylvania attorney Jason R. Antoine. Each state has its own penalties, which commonly include monetary damages, probation or jail time. Antoine also notes that criminal mischief penalties correlate with the dollar value associated with the damaged caused by the defendant.
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