Law

A:

The legal parking distance from a fire hydrant is set by local jurisdictions and may vary by location but is often 15 feet, such as the distance set by the New York City Police Department for cars parked within the city limits. The distance applies to both directions.

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  • What are the different degrees of assault?

    Q: What are the different degrees of assault?

    A: According to criminal defense attorney Bobby G. Frederick, assault and battery charges are divided into three separate categories: third degree, second degree and first degree. The difference in all three is the degree to which one person invades the personal space, or injures, another person. Third degree is mild in nature, second degree is moderate and first is the most serious.
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  • Are deaf people allowed to drive?

    Q: Are deaf people allowed to drive?

    A: Deaf people can drive, but they may need to install a few adaptive modifications in their vehicles to be able to drive safely. Many deaf drivers utilize special devices to alert them when fire trucks or ambulances are near them.
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  • How long does an eviction stay on your record?

    Q: How long does an eviction stay on your record?

    A: An eviction is typically removed from an individual's credit record after a seven-year period. An eviction is the legal removal of a tenant by a landlord. Evictions occur for a variety of reasons that include failure to pay rent, illegal behavior or breaking the rules of the rental agreement.
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  • How much money can I take abroad?

    Q: How much money can I take abroad?

    A: There is no limit to the amount of money that can be brought out of the United States. However, if the amount is more than $10,000, U.S. Customs and Border Protection requires the traveler to fill out a "Report of International Transportation of Currency and Monetary Instruments."
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  • What is the difference between power and authority?

    Q: What is the difference between power and authority?

    A: Authority involves the duties that are delegated to an individual while power is the possession of control that allows an individual to influence the actions of others. Most individuals who are in positions of power often have some type of authority.
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  • What is a judge's salary?

    Q: What is a judge's salary?

    A: According to the 2012 U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, a judge makes an average annual salary of $102,980, or $49.51 per hour. A judge's salary varies based upon geographic location, education, experience and legal sector.
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  • How do I find out if a divorce is final?

    Q: How do I find out if a divorce is final?

    A: There are multiple ways to find out if a divorce has been finalized. You can call the county courthouse in which it was filed in, if you are a party in the divorce you will receive notification via U.S. Postal Service, or you can contact your attorney.
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  • Can I evict someone living in my home?

    Q: Can I evict someone living in my home?

    A: LawNY explains that evicting someone from a private residence is a complicated legal issue that must be handled carefully. In order to evict, you must be the person in legal possession of the home and you must give sufficient notice for the other person to vacate the premises.
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  • How should one proceed if a spouse won't sign divorce papers?

    Q: How should one proceed if a spouse won't sign divorce papers?

    A: Should a spouse refuse to sign divorce papers, it is still possible to proceed with the divorce by filing legal paperwork as a single petitioner. According to LegalZoom, a spouse's signature is only necessary if both parties are agreeing to the divorce petition by filing jointly. Alternatively, one spouse can obtain a legal complaint for divorce (not the joint version), fill it out and file it.
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  • What happens to confiscated drug money?

    Q: What happens to confiscated drug money?

    A: Under federal law and according to the law in many states, law enforcement officials are permitted to keep drug money seized during raids to supplement their departments' revenues. When multiple departments work together on a raid, each is awarded a percentage of the money seized. This applies to the FBI as well as state, county and city police.
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  • What is a durable power of attorney?

    Q: What is a durable power of attorney?

    A: A durable power of attorney (POA) is a legal instrument that designates another responsible party to act on the behalf of the person executing the document, if they become incapacitated by illness or age, according to Nolo. Contrary to ordinary POAs, durable POAs remain in effect after a person becomes incapacitated. These can take effect immediately upon being executed, or only go into effect after mental incapacity has occurred. Additionally, once executed, POAs can be revoked at any time, provided the person is still legally competent, explains AgingCare.
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  • What is the law if my dog bites another dog?

    Q: What is the law if my dog bites another dog?

    A: Laws on pet liability depend on a number of factors including violations of animal control laws, negligence and specific provisions of state, county and municipal laws where the incident took place, according to attorney Kenneth Morgan Phillips, the top dog bite lawyer. A dog owner can be held accountable for his dog's actions if the owner failed to take proper precautions or does something unreasonable with the animal.
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  • Can you get a copy of a divorce decree online?

    Q: Can you get a copy of a divorce decree online?

    A: Generally, it is difficult to obtain a copy of a divorce decree online. You can search online for the location of a divorce decree, but you likely need to obtain a copy from the vital statistics office, the local Department of Records or the courthouse where the divorce occurred.
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  • What is the democratic process?

    Q: What is the democratic process?

    A: A democratic process is a practice that allows democracy to exist. Democracy is based on the idea that everyone should have equal rights and be allowed to participate in making important decisions. It is a form of government in which all eligible citizens are allowed equal participation, either directly (through elected leaders) or indirectly (in the proposal, development and establishment of laws that run the society).
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  • What is the National Reclamation Act?

    Q: What is the National Reclamation Act?

    A: The National Reclamation Act of 1902, also known as the Newlands Reclamation Act, allowed the federal government to commission and fund water irrigation projects, according to the National Archives. The law stemmed from arid conditions in the western states. Under the law, funding for the projects came from the sale of public land.
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  • Can a private citizen sue the President?

    Q: Can a private citizen sue the President?

    A: A private citizen may sue the President over alleged actions undertaken before or independently of the Presidential office. When the President acts on the authority of his office in any way, he is shielded by the doctrines of immunity.
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  • What is the basic premise of the National Response Framework?

    Q: What is the basic premise of the National Response Framework?

    A: According to the U.S. Army Combined Arms Center, the basic premise of the National Response Framework is that emergencies should be handled at the most local level possible. Typically local and state resources are sufficient for immediate emergency response as well as incident management, often through states' emergency management agencies.
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  • What is the purpose of a sample character reference letter for court?

    Q: What is the purpose of a sample character reference letter for court?

    A: The purpose of a sample character reference letter for court is to highlight the positive traits and behavior of someone who stands accused of committing a crime. Character reference letters are most often written by the defendant's friends, family members and acquaintances. Character references need to be written by people who have known the defendant for a significant amount of time and have not been accused or convicted of breaking the law.
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  • What happens when a house is condemned?

    Q: What happens when a house is condemned?

    A: When a house is condemned, the residents are given a notice to vacate the premises, usually with a short compliance period of one to 30 days, according to the City of St. Paul, Minn. In some instances the house is deemed too hazardous to be inhabited and the residents are required to move immediately.
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  • What is a no drop policy on domestic violence?

    Q: What is a no drop policy on domestic violence?

    A: A no-drop policy on domestic violence means that if a victim of domestic violence does not show up to court to testify against the defendant, the case is not dropped. Before no-drop policies were enacted in many areas, the result of a victim no-show meant a dismissal of the case.
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  • Can you marry yourself?

    Q: Can you marry yourself?

    A: Self-marriage is not officially recognized by any government bodies, according to HLNtv.com. It is a symbolic ceremony representing love of self and a lack of need to become part of a couple in order to achieve personal fulfillment.
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