Law

A:

While all municipalities are different with regards to how far back their records go, nearly every city or county maintains some record of the blueprints used for buildings and homes in the area. Many of these documents can be obtained online, but the majority are too old to have electronic versions available.

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  • What do the scales of justice stand for?

    Q: What do the scales of justice stand for?

    A:

    The scales of justice stand for the idea of balancing truth and fairness in the justice system. In ancient Greek mythology, the scales of justice represent divine justice.

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  • Why is censorship important?

    Q: Why is censorship important?

    A:

    Censorship is important because of its potential influence on citizens' rights to free speech. It's also important because of the perceived need and practice by some to limit the availability of information for various reasons.

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  • What happens if I miss my court date?

    Q: What happens if I miss my court date?

    A:

    Missing a court date is a violation of the law and can result in a bench warrant for arrest, fines and the loss of driving privileges, according to the Legal Aid Society and Superior Court of California. Making prompt contact with an attorney and bringing any appropriate papers that explain the absence to court are recommended courses of action after missing a court date, according to the Legal Aid Society.

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  • What are some of the arguments against the death penalty?

    Q: What are some of the arguments against the death penalty?

    A:

    The death penalty violates the constitution, is a waste of taxpayer’s money and is usually applied in an unfair and unjust manner depending on who a person is and where they come from, according to the American Civil Liberties Union. The ACLU reports that more than 140 innocent people have died under the death penalty in the United States since 1973.

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  • Why is the Constitution important?

    Q: Why is the Constitution important?

    A:

    The Constitution is important because it protects individual freedom, and its fundamental principles govern the United States. The Constitution places the government’s power in the hands of the citizens. It limits the power of the government and establishes a system of checks and balances. It is also the framework for the freedoms that are granted to each American.

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  • Can you marry the same person twice without a divorce?

    Q: Can you marry the same person twice without a divorce?

    A:

    It is not possible to marry the same person twice without a divorce. When people are legally married with an issued marriage license that's been signed, they cannot get married again.

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  • What are the different degrees of assault?

    Q: What are the different degrees of assault?

    A:

    According to criminal defense attorney Bobby G. Frederick, assault and battery charges are divided into three separate categories: third degree, second degree and first degree. The difference in all three is the degree to which one person invades the personal space, or injures, another person. Third degree is mild in nature, second degree is moderate and first is the most serious.

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  • What is the definition of defamatory speech?

    Q: What is the definition of defamatory speech?

    A:

    Defamatory speech is any false, publicly spoken statement that harms the reputation of another person, group of people or organization. Another term for defamatory speech is slander.

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  • What is a misdemeanor citation?

    Q: What is a misdemeanor citation?

    A:

    A misdemeanor citation is an issuance to appear in court to answer the charges presented against the violator, according to the Third Judicial District Court of Idaho. A misdemeanor is not as serious as a felony charge, but it is more egregious than an infraction.

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  • What is the difference between a public and private nuisance?

    Q: What is the difference between a public and private nuisance?

    A:

    The Cornell University Law School's Legal Information Institute states that a public nuisance transpires when a person unreasonably inhibits a right shared by the general public, while a private nuisance occurs when a plaintiff's use and satisfaction of private property is affected greatly and unreasonably through a thing or action. Courts may grant damages and prohibit further activity by the offender for either type of transgression.

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  • How do you get the blueprints of an existing building?

    Q: How do you get the blueprints of an existing building?

    A:

    While all municipalities are different with regards to how far back their records go, nearly every city or county maintains some record of the blueprints used for buildings and homes in the area. Many of these documents can be obtained online, but the majority are too old to have electronic versions available.

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  • Can you leave the country while on probation?

    Q: Can you leave the country while on probation?

    A:

    According to the Law Offices of Powers Sellers & Finkelstein, it is possible to leave the country while on probation if permission is attained from a parole officer. The parole officer takes several things into account, such as the parolee's business abroad and the crime for which he was sentenced.

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  • What is the definition of open sky policy?

    Q: What is the definition of open sky policy?

    A:

    Open sky agreements between countries eliminate the use of government oversight in commercial air carrier services such as capacity and pricing, giving carriers the ability to provide convenient and affordable air service. These agreements give airlines the right to fly to all points on the globe to encourage airline globalization.

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  • What is the purpose of a suppression hearing?

    Q: What is the purpose of a suppression hearing?

    A:

    The purpose of a suppression hearing is to allow the judge to determine whether a given piece of evidence or testimony will be ruled admissible in court. This usually happens if a lawyer has cause to believe that police acted improperly, violated their client's rights, or otherwise have a weak case, according to the website of the State of New York court system.

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  • How do I find out if a divorce is final?

    Q: How do I find out if a divorce is final?

    A:

    There are multiple ways to find out if a divorce has been finalized. You can call the county courthouse in which it was filed in, if you are a party in the divorce you will receive notification via U.S. Postal Service, or you can contact your attorney.

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  • How late can telemarketers call?

    Q: How late can telemarketers call?

    A:

    According to the Federal Trade Commission, telemarketers are allowed to make calls as late as 9 p.m. Calls from telemarketers are allowed to begin as early as 8 a.m.

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  • What is a lie of omission?

    Q: What is a lie of omission?

    A:

    A lie of omission is a lie in which someone deliberately withholds pertinent details about something in order to skew someone else's idea of the truth or engender a misconception. Although a lie of omission is not technically a lie because it contains no false information, it is still referred to as one colloquially because it is deliberately misleading.

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  • How much beer can I bring into Canada?

    Q: How much beer can I bring into Canada?

    A:

    Both Canadian residents and non-Canadian visitors to Canada may bring up to 8.5 liters of beer into Canada. In normal 355-milliliter cans or bottles of beer, this equals 24 servings.

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  • What states have banned pit bulls?

    Q: What states have banned pit bulls?

    A:

    As of September 2014, no states have enacted breed-specific laws, or BSLs, banning pit bulls. However, there are over 700 U.S. cities in 40 states that have enacted these bans. Additionally, appellate courts in 12 states have upheld the constitutionality of breed-specific pit bull laws, including Arkansas, Colorado, Florida, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, New Mexico, Ohio, Utah, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin and Washington, D.C.

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  • How is a resolution different from a bill?

    Q: How is a resolution different from a bill?

    A:

    According to the U.S. Government Printing Office, joint resolutions typically address limited issues while bills often cover broader topics. They are essentially the same, however, because each must be passed by both houses of Congress and signed by the president.

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  • Why is it called jaywalking?

    Q: Why is it called jaywalking?

    A:

    The term jaywalking originates from the word "jay". Contrary to popular belief, this is not the shape of the path the person makes. Instead, jay was the name given to people that were considered simpletons or idiots.

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