Law

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According to the Jewish Virtual Library, the Nuremberg trials resulted in 19 convictions of the 22 defendants on trial. Twelve received the death penalty, three received sentences of life imprisonment and the remaining four convictions resulted in sentences of 10 to 20 years. In addition, a 23rd defendant was found unfit to stand trial, while the 24th committed suicide before the proceedings began.

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