Elections

A:

Citizens aged 65 and older are most likely to vote in elections. According to US News, nearly 61 percent of citizens over the age of 65 voted in the November 2010 election.

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  • Who did Ronald Reagan run against for his presidential campaigns?

    Q: Who did Ronald Reagan run against for his presidential campaigns?

    A: When seeking the United States presidency, Ronald Reagan ran against then-President Jimmy Carter in 1980 and Walter Mondale in 1984. He won with 489 of the 538 electoral votes, becoming the 40th U.S. president. Reagan was re-elected in 1984 with 525 of the 538 electoral votes.
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  • How many terms can the vice president serve?

    Q: How many terms can the vice president serve?

    A: The vice president of the United States is not subject to any term limits. Unlike the president, the vice president can serve in the role indefinitely.
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  • How long does a member of the House of Representatives serve for?

    Q: How long does a member of the House of Representatives serve for?

    A: Members of the House of Representatives serve 2-year terms. These terms come up for reelection in even calendar years.
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  • Why did Andrew Jackson lose the election of 1824?

    Q: Why did Andrew Jackson lose the election of 1824?

    A: Andrew Jackson lost the election of 1824 because, though he received a majority of the popular and electoral votes, his margin was not great enough for a win, and the constitution directed that the election had to be decided by Congress. Henry Clay, one of the candidates, gave his support to John Quincy Adams, another candidate, and Adams won the Congressional vote.
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  • Why were women not allowed to vote?

    Q: Why were women not allowed to vote?

    A: There were multiple arguments against women's suffrage. Common themes were that a woman's delicate constitution made her unfit for the evils of politics, that she was too occupied with domestic duties to ponder political debate, and that she was too stupid or weak to bear the responsibilities of voting.
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  • Which part of the legislature approves presidential appointments?

    Q: Which part of the legislature approves presidential appointments?

    A: In the United States, the Senate is the branch of the legislature that approves presidential appointments. Clause 2 of Section 2 of Article 2 of the U.S. Constitution guarantees the Senate's power to give "Advice and Consent" to presidential appointments.
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  • What is the purpose of the electoral college?

    Q: What is the purpose of the electoral college?

    A: The purpose of the electoral college is to be a compromise between election of the president by the vote of Congress and the popular vote of the people. The founding fathers established the electoral college in the United States Constitution, believing that it would be both a buffer and provide fair power to all states regardless of size.
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  • How old do you have to be to run for Congress?

    Q: How old do you have to be to run for Congress?

    A: In the United States as of 2014, candidates for Congress must be 25 years old to run for a seat in the House of Representatives and 30 years old to run for a seat in the Senate. Other countries have other age minimums for their respective legislative bodies.
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  • Why is voting so important?

    Q: Why is voting so important?

    A: Voting is one of the surest ways for citizens to establish influence over elected officials. Because politicians are concerned primarily with the most vocal elements of their constituencies, groups of people who do not vote tend to receive less attention. This ultimately translates into less power for non-voters to affect the formation of public policy in accordance with their own private interests.
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  • Who ran against Bill Clinton for president?

    Q: Who ran against Bill Clinton for president?

    A: William Jefferson Clinton ran against George H.W. Bush and Ross Perot in the 1992 United States presidential elections, and Bob Dole and Ross Perot were his opponents in the 1996 elections. In the 1992 election, Bush was the incumbent Republican president and Perot ran as an independent. Clinton, a Democrat, won with 43 percent of the votes.
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  • What month does the Presidential Inauguration take place?

    Q: What month does the Presidential Inauguration take place?

    A: The presidential inauguration takes place during the month of January. More specifically, the inauguration takes place on January 20. If that date happens to be a Sunday, then the ceremony is held the following day.
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  • What age group is most likely to vote?

    Q: What age group is most likely to vote?

    A: Citizens aged 65 and older are most likely to vote in elections. According to US News, nearly 61 percent of citizens over the age of 65 voted in the November 2010 election.
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  • When do we vote for the next president?

    Q: When do we vote for the next president?

    A: The next presidential election date for legal U.S. residents is Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2016. The date always falls on the Tuesday after the first Monday of November every four years. The last election was held on Nov. 6, 2012.
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  • How does the media influence politics?

    Q: How does the media influence politics?

    A: The media influences politics by helping to shape public opinion. The United States has a democratic government, meaning that the people vote to elect leaders and change laws based on the majority. When these voters rely on the mass media to assist them in developing an opinion for determining a vote, the media influences politics.
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  • Why does the United States hold elections on Tuesdays?

    Q: Why does the United States hold elections on Tuesdays?

    A: In 1845, the United States Congress selected the first Tuesday after the first Monday in November as the universal election day for federal elections; the motivations behind this choice are related to technological limitations on elections that made immediate vote tallying and communication difficult. Having election days on Tuesdays also avoids potential interference in voting ability for religious people who recognize a sabbath day on which they may be restricted from traveling to a polling location or performing work-like duties such as voting.
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  • Q: Is registration for voting in elections available online?

    A: As of 2015, over 25 states accept online registration to vote, including Minnesota, Arizona, Oregon, Hawaii and Missouri. The government advises people to seek help from the state election office to inquire about online voter registrations.
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  • How do you find out which precinct you are supposed to vote in?

    Q: How do you find out which precinct you are supposed to vote in?

    A: The best way to find out which precinct you are supposed to vote in is to contact your state or county election office. Most locations have a website that you can use to search for your local precinct and contact information.
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  • Q: How do you find out where to go to vote in Minnesota?

    A: Find out where to vote on the Minnesota Secretary of State's website, SOS.State.MN.us by hovering your mouse over the Elections & Voting heading near the top left of the home page and then clicking the Voters link. Click the Find Where You Vote link under the Find Your Polling Place heading, enter a ZIP code or county, and then click Go. Follow the prompts to find a local voting station.
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  • Q: What is the median voter theorem?

    A: The median voter theorem, first proposed by Anthony Downs in 1957, holds that in a majority-rule voting system, the population chooses the outcome preferred by the median voter. This means that politicians who stray too far from the political center are likely to be voted out of office.
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  • Q: For how long are U.S. senators elected?

    A: Senators are elected for 6-year terms and can be elected to the United States Senate an unlimited number of times. In the initial writing of the U.S. Constitution, Senators had to be elected by state legislatures, but the 17th Amendment gave the power to the people with election by popular vote.
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  • Q: How do you find your voting precinct?

    A: Many Secretary of State and some county websites have search engines that locate precincts and polling booths. Requirements vary among websites, but many require users to enter at least some of their address information and region of jurisdiction, after which the websites pull up precinct numbers and area voting locations.
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