Crime

A:

The phrase "drink the Kool-Aid" is a derogatory term that refers to people who blindly follow someone or something without question, such as devotees of a particularly politician. Proper usage of the phrase makes reference to the beverage known as Kool-Aid, a reference to a mass death involving members of a cult called the People's Temple.

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  • How Old Was Nelson Mandela When He Went to Jail?

    Q: How Old Was Nelson Mandela When He Went to Jail?

    A: Nelson Mandela was 44 years old when he first went to jail in 1962. Mandela was imprisoned for 28 years until his release on Feb. 11, 1990.
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  • What Are Five Elements of Fraud?

    Q: What Are Five Elements of Fraud?

    A: To demonstrate that fraud has taken place, an investigator or prosecutor must establish five conditions. These are that facts have been misrepresented, the misrepresented facts were material to the transaction and were intended to be relied upon, the victim justifiably relied upon the misrepresentation, and material harm resulted.
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  • Who Were Bonnie and Clyde?

    Q: Who Were Bonnie and Clyde?

    A: Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow were American criminals who committed multiple murders and robberies of gas stations, stores, and banks during the Great Depression of the 1930s, working their way across the country and hitting targets in Texas,
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  • What Are the Main Causes of Poaching?

    Q: What Are the Main Causes of Poaching?

    A: Poverty is one of the main reasons why people are motivated to poach, according to The Guardian. Corruption also drives poaching, particularly among corrupt officials and policemen. Traffickers and cartels also feed the poaching trade.
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  • Who Was the Black Dahlia?

    Q: Who Was the Black Dahlia?

    A: The Black Dahlia is a pseudonym given to Elizabeth Short, a woman who was brutally murdered in Los Angeles in 1947. This name was used in place of Short's real name as part of the news media's tendency at that time to give florid nicknames to murders that were especially appalling.
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  • What Is the Safest City in the World?

    Q: What Is the Safest City in the World?

    A: The safest city in the world is Melbourne, Australia, which received a 97.5 out of 100 city score from the Economist Intelligence Unit. These city scores are based on criteria such as safety, quality of life, cleanliness, culture and affordability.
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  • What Is Rhino Poaching?

    Q: What Is Rhino Poaching?

    A: Rhino poaching refers to the illegal hunting of rhinoceros in Africa, primarily because of an increase in the demand for a traditional Chinese medicine that is made from the powder of rhinoceros horn. According to Save the Rhino, an animal that boasted a population of more than 500,000 throughout the world early in the 1900s is in danger of extinction, despite aggressive efforts to fight the practice of poaching. In 2011, the Western black rhino was declared to be extinct, primarily as a result of poaching.
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  • How Many Prisoners Escape From Jail Each Year?

    Q: How Many Prisoners Escape From Jail Each Year?

    A: The exact number of prisoners who escape varies from year to year, and in general, these numbers have been on the decline as time has progressed; for example, in 1993, the Bureau of Justice Statistics reported that one state had 14,305 escapes,
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  • What Is Strong Arm Robbery?

    Q: What Is Strong Arm Robbery?

    A: The Free Dictionary defines strong arm robbery as taking or stealing something from a person using force or threats but without using a weapon. Use of any weapon when committing a robbery, even if only used to threaten, is considered armed robbery.
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  • Why Is Graffiti Bad?

    Q: Why Is Graffiti Bad?

    A: Graffiti is considered bad because it is associated with broken window theory and other kinds of street crime. Graffiti is associated with gang activity and tagging behaviors whereby criminal groups indicate the areas they circulate by painting specific symbols on walls and other structures. Graffiti encourages littering, loitering and illegal behavior.
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  • What Are Some Mob Nicknames?

    Q: What Are Some Mob Nicknames?

    A: Members of the Italian-American mafia tend to receive clever or seemingly funny nicknames, including Anthony "Tony Bagels" Cavezza, Giuseppe "Pooch" Destefano, Christopher "Burger" Reynolds, Anthony "Baby Fat Larry" Durso and Joseph "Junior Lollipops" Carna. These are just a few of the nicknames culled from FBI documents associated with a massive 2011 mafia bust in New York.
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  • What States Still Use the Electric Chair?

    Q: What States Still Use the Electric Chair?

    A: As of September 2014, eight states still have electrocution available as an execution method, including Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Kentucky, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia. These states primarily use lethal injection for inmate executions, and the electric chair is used only at the convict's discretion in most jurisdictions. Nebraska used electrocution for executions until the Nebraska Supreme Court ruled the practice unconstitutional in 2008.
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  • What Are the Effects of Invasion of Privacy?

    Q: What Are the Effects of Invasion of Privacy?

    A: Privacy is a basic human need, and invasion of privacy can have serious psychological and emotional consequences, including paranoia, anxiety, depression and broken trust. Invasion of privacy is both a legal and an ethical issue.
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  • What Is a Class 4 Felony in Arizona?

    Q: What Is a Class 4 Felony in Arizona?

    A: According to Avvo, Class 4 felonies in Arizona include theft, possession of narcotics, possession of dangerous drugs, forgery, identity theft, weapons misconduct and driving under the influence. The Law Offices of David Cantor list computer crimes, such as tampering and possession of an unauthorized access device, as Class 4 felonies.
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  • Was The Godfather Based on True Facts?

    Q: Was The Godfather Based on True Facts?

    A: There are aspects of the novel "The Godfather," and its film adaptation, that are based on or inspired by real-life events; for example, the novel's author, Mario Puzo, has described dealing with Frank Sinatra, who was angry that he served as the apparent inspiration for the "Godfather" character Johnny Fontaine. In both the novel and the movie, Fontaine is a popular singer with strong social ties to the mafia, and his story seems to have many parallels with Sinatra's, but Puzo was hesitant to confirm that the fictional popular singer with mob connections was actually based on the real-life popular singer with mob connections. In spite of Puzo's reticence to confirm suspicions, it seems unlikely that the fictional story was not inspired by real life, including instances in which Sinatra's career benefitted from mafia influence.
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  • What Is Considered a Class D Felony in Indiana?

    Q: What Is Considered a Class D Felony in Indiana?

    A: According to the law office of Ross G. Thomas, Class D felonies in Indiana cover crimes such as possession of more than 30 grams of marijuana or operating a vehicle while intoxicated (OWI). Theft and criminal confinement also fall under this classification. Class D felonies are the lowest level of misdemeanor offense.
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  • How Can You Detect Counterfeit Currency?

    Q: How Can You Detect Counterfeit Currency?

    A: There are several different ways to detect counterfeit currency, including examining the bill for characteristic design details, including proper printing of features like the portrait and borders and the presence and proper appearance of water
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  • What Is the Minimum Sentence for Arson?

    Q: What Is the Minimum Sentence for Arson?

    A: As of 2011, in the United States, the minimum sentence for Arson is three to five years in prison and a $15,000 fine. This sentence is for arson in the third degree, which encompasses fires not intentionally set that caused significant bodily harm or damage.
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  • Where Is the Safest Place to Live in the United States?

    Q: Where Is the Safest Place to Live in the United States?

    A: The safest city in the United States, based on its local crime rates, is Franklin, Mass. Franklin is located near Dover, Medfield and Norfolk. An average of 0.37 crimes per 1,000 residents occur in Franklin every year, as of September 2014.
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  • What Is the California Dog Bite Law?

    Q: What Is the California Dog Bite Law?

    A: California has strict liability statutes against dog owners in the case of a dog bite. The dog owner is fully liable for injuries sustained to another person if his dog bites them, whether the victim was on public or private property.
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  • What Is the Penalty for Stealing Mail?

    Q: What Is the Penalty for Stealing Mail?

    A: A person convicted of mail theft faces a fine of up to $250,000 and up to five years in federal prison. Stealing mail is a felony offense in the United States.
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