Crime

A:

The safest city in the United States, based on its local crime rates, is Franklin, Mass. Franklin is located near Dover, Medfield and Norfolk. An average of 0.37 crimes per 1,000 residents occur in Franklin every year, as of September 2014.

See Full Answer
Filed Under:
  • What happens if you lie under oath?

    Q: What happens if you lie under oath?

    A: If you lie in a sworn statement or under oath in a court of law, you commit perjury and can face criminal charges, according to FindLaw, a leader in online legal services and information. Under federal and state laws, penalties include fines, probation or imprisonment for up to five years. If you are in law enforcement, public service or in service to the courts and convicted of perjury, your employment can be terminated.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • How much money did Al Capone make?

    Q: How much money did Al Capone make?

    A: Al Capone, an American gangster, was speculated to have made around $100 million annually from his illegal enterprise. Al Capone inherited his business from a mentor in Chicago named Johnny Torrio. Torrio left his own business to Al Capone to run and returned to Italy.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What are the effects of invasion of privacy?

    Q: What are the effects of invasion of privacy?

    A: Privacy is a basic human need, and invasion of privacy can have serious psychological and emotional consequences, including paranoia, anxiety, depression and broken trust. Invasion of privacy is both a legal and an ethical issue.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What is strong arm robbery?

    Q: What is strong arm robbery?

    A: The Free Dictionary defines strong arm robbery as taking or stealing something from a person using force or threats but without using a weapon. Use of any weapon when committing a robbery, even if only used to threaten, is considered armed robbery.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What are some Mob nicknames?

    Q: What are some Mob nicknames?

    A: Members of the Italian-American mafia tend to receive clever or seemingly funny nicknames, including Anthony "Tony Bagels" Cavezza, Giuseppe "Pooch" Destefano, Christopher "Burger" Reynolds, Anthony "Baby Fat Larry" Durso and Joseph "Junior Lollipops" Carna. These are just a few of the nicknames culled from FBI documents associated with a massive 2011 mafia bust in New York.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What is a citation from the police?

    Q: What is a citation from the police?

    A: A citation from a police officer is a legal document that serves as a notice to appear in court in response to a charge against an individual. These kinds of summons are used in financial liability situations, traffic incidents and other legal proceedings where a warrant is not issued. Citations include the name of the officer, the matter the document relates to and the date and time to appear.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • Where is the safest place to live in the United States?

    Q: Where is the safest place to live in the United States?

    A: The safest city in the United States, based on its local crime rates, is Franklin, Mass. Franklin is located near Dover, Medfield and Norfolk. An average of 0.37 crimes per 1,000 residents occur in Franklin every year, as of September 2014.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What are the causes of crime in South Africa?

    Q: What are the causes of crime in South Africa?

    A: Most South Africans believe that the major cause of crime in South Africa is poverty. However, recent studies suggest that social structures emerging from the apartheid era may actually be the primary driving force for many of the crimes within the nation.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • Who were Bonnie and Clyde?

    Q: Who were Bonnie and Clyde?

    A: Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow were American criminals who committed multiple murders and robberies of gas stations, stores, and banks during the Great Depression of the 1930s, working their way across the country and hitting targets in Texas,
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What are the Mafia's ties to Italy?

    Q: What are the Mafia's ties to Italy?

    A: The concept of a mafia has deep ties to Italy, with the word "mafia" first being used to describe independent paramilitary groups on the Italian island of Sicily, and while Italian-American mafias generally operate as sovereign entities, these organizations take cultural influence from Italy. For example, though American mobsters typically do not have direct connections to Italian mafia members, Italian-American mafias tend to use Italian mafia words and concepts such as "omerta," a code of conduct that forbids mafia members from providing information to the government. The word "mafia" itself has strong ties to Italy; though the word has taken on an English meaning, "mafia" is a Sicilian Italian word, an adjective that describes a blend of elegance and courage.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • Should juveniles be tried as adults?

    Q: Should juveniles be tried as adults?

    A: According to the Equal Justice Initiative, for certain criminal offenses, children are allowed to be tried as adults in every state. Although there is dissent about trying juveniles as adults, many organizations are fighting against it because they maintain that it does more harm than good.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What are five elements of fraud?

    Q: What are five elements of fraud?

    A: To demonstrate that fraud has taken place, an investigator or prosecutor must establish five conditions. These are that facts have been misrepresented, the misrepresented facts were material to the transaction and were intended to be relied upon, the victim justifiably relied upon the misrepresentation, and material harm resulted.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • Is pulling a fire alarm a felony?

    Q: Is pulling a fire alarm a felony?

    A: The first offense of pulling a fire alarm without cause is a misdemeanor. Repeat offenders can face felony charges. However, the first offense may result in felony charges if the prank results in injury or property damage.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What is the minimum sentence for arson?

    Q: What is the minimum sentence for arson?

    A: As of 2011, in the United States, the minimum sentence for Arson is three to five years in prison and a $15,000 fine. This sentence is for arson in the third degree, which encompasses fires not intentionally set that caused significant bodily harm or damage.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What is rhino poaching?

    Q: What is rhino poaching?

    A: Rhino poaching refers to the illegal hunting of rhinoceros in Africa, primarily because of an increase in the demand for a traditional Chinese medicine that is made from the powder of rhinoceros horn. According to Save the Rhino, an animal that boasted a population of more than 500,000 throughout the world early in the 1900s is in danger of extinction, despite aggressive efforts to fight the practice of poaching. In 2011, the Western black rhino was declared to be extinct, primarily as a result of poaching.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What does "drinking the Kool-Aid" mean?

    Q: What does "drinking the Kool-Aid" mean?

    A: The phrase "drink the Kool-Aid" is a derogatory term that refers to people who blindly follow someone or something without question, such as devotees of a particularly politician. Proper usage of the phrase makes reference to the beverage known as Kool-Aid, a reference to a mass death involving members of a cult called the People's Temple.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What is considered third-degree assault in Connecticut?

    Q: What is considered third-degree assault in Connecticut?

    A: According to the Connecticut General Assembly, third-degree assault is discussed in chapter 952 of the Connecticut Penal Code. Assault in the third degree is a class A misdemeanor. Connecticut attorney Erin Field explains that it is defined as intentionally causing injury or recklessly causing serious injury. With criminal negligence, it is defined as causing serious physical injury with a deadly weapon.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What is a chronic offender?

    Q: What is a chronic offender?

    A: A chronic offender is a person with multiple criminal convictions spread across multiple criminal events. Chronic offenders are responsible for a significant fraction of both property and violent crimes, according to the Minnesota Office of the Legislative Auditor. Many states have sentencing guidelines that give chronic offenders lengthy sentences.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What is a Class 4 felony in Arizona?

    Q: What is a Class 4 felony in Arizona?

    A: According to Avvo, Class 4 felonies in Arizona include theft, possession of narcotics, possession of dangerous drugs, forgery, identity theft, weapons misconduct and driving under the influence. The Law Offices of David Cantor list computer crimes, such as tampering and possession of an unauthorized access device, as Class 4 felonies.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • Who opened the Flamingo casino?

    Q: Who opened the Flamingo casino?

    A: A gambling magnate and crime boss named Benjamin "Bugsy" Siegel is responsible for founding the Flamingo Las Vegas, a luxury resort hotel and casino that was opened in 1946 and is still operational as of 2015. Bugsy Siegel is often credited as being one of the founders of modern Las Vegas as a gambling and resort destination, thanks in part to his role in founding the Flamingo.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What is the penalty for stealing mail?

    Q: What is the penalty for stealing mail?

    A: A person convicted of mail theft faces a fine of up to $250,000 and up to five years in federal prison. Stealing mail is a felony offense in the United States.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under: