Crime

A:

In 1962, Nelson Mandela was convicted by the South African government on charges of inciting public strikes and leaving the country without permission. He was sentenced to five years in prison.

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  • What Is Strong Arm Robbery?

    Q: What Is Strong Arm Robbery?

    A: The Free Dictionary defines strong arm robbery as taking or stealing something from a person using force or threats but without using a weapon. Use of any weapon when committing a robbery, even if only used to threaten, is considered armed robbery.
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  • What Happened to Jimmy Hoffa?

    Q: What Happened to Jimmy Hoffa?

    A: Controversial labor leader Jimmy Hoffa disappeared in the summer of 1975, and despite great public and official interest, there is no substantial or reliable trace of his whereabouts or ultimate fate. There are a number of theories on the subject, ranging from the fantastic, such as the idea that Hoffa's body is encased within concrete at New Jersey's Giants Stadium, to the mundane, such as the theory that Hoffa was murdered and then dumped in a swampy area of Florida.
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  • What Is the California Dog Bite Law?

    Q: What Is the California Dog Bite Law?

    A: California has strict liability statutes against dog owners in the case of a dog bite. The dog owner is fully liable for injuries sustained to another person if his dog bites them, whether the victim was on public or private property.
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  • What Are the Main Causes of Poaching?

    Q: What Are the Main Causes of Poaching?

    A: Poverty is one of the main reasons why people are motivated to poach, according to The Guardian. Corruption also drives poaching, particularly among corrupt officials and policemen. Traffickers and cartels also feed the poaching trade.
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  • How Can You Detect Counterfeit Currency?

    Q: How Can You Detect Counterfeit Currency?

    A: There are several different ways to detect counterfeit currency, including examining the bill for characteristic design details, including proper printing of features like the portrait and borders and the presence and proper appearance of water
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  • Which Is the Bigger Caliber: .357 or .45?

    Q: Which Is the Bigger Caliber: .357 or .45?

    A: HowStuffWorks explains that a .45 caliber bullet is slightly larger than a .357 caliber bullet. Caliber refers to the diameter of a bullet or barrel in inches, which means that the .45 bullet is approximately .093 inches larger than the .357 round.
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  • How Much Money Did Al Capone Make?

    Q: How Much Money Did Al Capone Make?

    A: Al Capone, an American gangster, was speculated to have made around $100 million annually from his illegal enterprise. Al Capone inherited his business from a mentor in Chicago named Johnny Torrio. Torrio left his own business to Al Capone to run and returned to Italy.
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  • How and Why Was the Mafia Formed?

    Q: How and Why Was the Mafia Formed?

    A: There is some evidence to suggest that the original group known as a "mafia" was an unofficial organization of residents on the Italian island of Sicily who grouped together to form paramilitary groups in order to defend their small island home from invaders. This militaristic origin may be responsible for the formal organizational structure, which relies on a top-down leadership structure and strict adherence to the word of superiors. However, it may be difficult to know exactly what the origins of the Sicilian mafia are, due to the mafia's code of omerta, which demands that members keep mafia activities a secret from outsiders, particularly those in positions of legal authority.
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  • Should Juveniles Be Tried As Adults?

    Q: Should Juveniles Be Tried As Adults?

    A: According to the Equal Justice Initiative, for certain criminal offenses, children are allowed to be tried as adults in every state. Although there is dissent about trying juveniles as adults, many organizations are fighting against it because they maintain that it does more harm than good.
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  • What Are the Effects of Vandalism?

    Q: What Are the Effects of Vandalism?

    A: The Fareham Borough Council states that one of the major effects of vandalism is that it makes people feel less safe. It is potentially dangerous, and people have died due to uncontrolled vandalism.
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  • What Is a Class 4 Felony in Arizona?

    Q: What Is a Class 4 Felony in Arizona?

    A: According to Avvo, Class 4 felonies in Arizona include theft, possession of narcotics, possession of dangerous drugs, forgery, identity theft, weapons misconduct and driving under the influence. The Law Offices of David Cantor list computer crimes, such as tampering and possession of an unauthorized access device, as Class 4 felonies.
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  • What Is a Citation From the Police?

    Q: What Is a Citation From the Police?

    A: A citation from a police officer is a legal document that serves as a notice to appear in court in response to a charge against an individual. These kinds of summons are used in financial liability situations, traffic incidents and other legal proceedings where a warrant is not issued. Citations include the name of the officer, the matter the document relates to and the date and time to appear.
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  • What Are the Causes of Teenage Crime?

    Q: What Are the Causes of Teenage Crime?

    A: According to the Ontario Ministry of Child and Youth Services, the causes of teenage or youth crimes are numerous. Prominent causes include economic deprivation, psychological causes and media perception.
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  • What Is Considered Third-Degree Assault in Connecticut?

    Q: What Is Considered Third-Degree Assault in Connecticut?

    A: According to the Connecticut General Assembly, third-degree assault is discussed in chapter 952 of the Connecticut Penal Code. Assault in the third degree is a class A misdemeanor. Connecticut attorney Erin Field explains that it is defined as intentionally causing injury or recklessly causing serious injury. With criminal negligence, it is defined as causing serious physical injury with a deadly weapon.
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  • What Are the Causes of Crime in South Africa?

    Q: What Are the Causes of Crime in South Africa?

    A: Most South Africans believe that the major cause of crime in South Africa is poverty. However, recent studies suggest that social structures emerging from the apartheid era may actually be the primary driving force for many of the crimes within the nation.
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  • What Happens When a Stolen Car Is Recovered?

    Q: What Happens When a Stolen Car Is Recovered?

    A: When the police recover a stolen car, it normally has damage from the thieves breaking into it, reckless driving or removal of anything of value, which the insurance company evaluates to determine if the car is a total loss. If its repair is feasible and the owner has comprehensive coverage, insurance typically pays to restore its previous condition.
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  • Is Pulling a Fire Alarm a Felony?

    Q: Is Pulling a Fire Alarm a Felony?

    A: The first offense of pulling a fire alarm without cause is a misdemeanor. Repeat offenders can face felony charges. However, the first offense may result in felony charges if the prank results in injury or property damage.
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  • Who Were Bonnie and Clyde?

    Q: Who Were Bonnie and Clyde?

    A: Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow were American criminals who committed multiple murders and robberies of gas stations, stores, and banks during the Great Depression of the 1930s, working their way across the country and hitting targets in Texas,
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  • Why Is Graffiti Bad?

    Q: Why Is Graffiti Bad?

    A: Graffiti is considered bad because it is associated with broken window theory and other kinds of street crime. Graffiti is associated with gang activity and tagging behaviors whereby criminal groups indicate the areas they circulate by painting specific symbols on walls and other structures. Graffiti encourages littering, loitering and illegal behavior.
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  • What States Still Use the Electric Chair?

    Q: What States Still Use the Electric Chair?

    A: As of September 2014, eight states still have electrocution available as an execution method, including Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Kentucky, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia. These states primarily use lethal injection for inmate executions, and the electric chair is used only at the convict's discretion in most jurisdictions. Nebraska used electrocution for executions until the Nebraska Supreme Court ruled the practice unconstitutional in 2008.
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  • What Is Rhino Poaching?

    Q: What Is Rhino Poaching?

    A: Rhino poaching refers to the illegal hunting of rhinoceros in Africa, primarily because of an increase in the demand for a traditional Chinese medicine that is made from the powder of rhinoceros horn. According to Save the Rhino, an animal that boasted a population of more than 500,000 throughout the world early in the 1900s is in danger of extinction, despite aggressive efforts to fight the practice of poaching. In 2011, the Western black rhino was declared to be extinct, primarily as a result of poaching.
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