Crime

A:

In 1962, Nelson Mandela was convicted by the South African government on charges of inciting public strikes and leaving the country without permission. He was sentenced to five years in prison.

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  • What does "drinking the Kool-Aid" mean?

    Q: What does "drinking the Kool-Aid" mean?

    A: The phrase "drink the Kool-Aid" is a derogatory term that refers to people who blindly follow someone or something without question, such as devotees of a particularly politician. Proper usage of the phrase makes reference to the beverage known as Kool-Aid, a reference to a mass death involving members of a cult called the People's Temple.
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  • What city has the highest crime rate in America?

    Q: What city has the highest crime rate in America?

    A: According to Neighborhoodscout.com, an online crime statistics resource, East Saint Louis, IL is the most dangerous city in the United States thanks to its high rates of violent crimes and property theft. However, the FBI cautions agai
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  • How did the Zodiac Killer communicate with police?

    Q: How did the Zodiac Killer communicate with police?

    A: The Zodiac Killer was an unidentified serial killer who is believe to have operated during the late 1960s and early 1970s and is particularly famous for his or her habit of communicating with police and newspapers; the Zodiac Killer is known to have placed multiple calls to police departments, in addition to sending a series of coded messages to local newspapers. There are a total of five confirmed murders attributed to the Zodiac Killer, though the killer claimed in his or her communications with the media to have killed up to 37 individuals. The crimes that are attributed to the Zodiac Killer all took place in northern California, mostly around the San Francisco Bay Area, with the alleged murderer habitually contacting police departments and newspapers in that area.
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  • What are the causes of crime in South Africa?

    Q: What are the causes of crime in South Africa?

    A: Most South Africans believe that the major cause of crime in South Africa is poverty. However, recent studies suggest that social structures emerging from the apartheid era may actually be the primary driving force for many of the crimes within the nation.
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  • Why is graffiti bad?

    Q: Why is graffiti bad?

    A: Graffiti is considered bad because it is associated with broken window theory and other kinds of street crime. Graffiti is associated with gang activity and tagging behaviors whereby criminal groups indicate the areas they circulate by painting specific symbols on walls and other structures. Graffiti encourages littering, loitering and illegal behavior.
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  • Should juveniles be tried as adults?

    Q: Should juveniles be tried as adults?

    A: According to the Equal Justice Initiative, for certain criminal offenses, children are allowed to be tried as adults in every state. Although there is dissent about trying juveniles as adults, many organizations are fighting against it because they maintain that it does more harm than good.
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  • What is considered third-degree assault in Connecticut?

    Q: What is considered third-degree assault in Connecticut?

    A: According to the Connecticut General Assembly, third-degree assault is discussed in chapter 952 of the Connecticut Penal Code. Assault in the third degree is a class A misdemeanor. Connecticut attorney Erin Field explains that it is defined as intentionally causing injury or recklessly causing serious injury. With criminal negligence, it is defined as causing serious physical injury with a deadly weapon.
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  • What happens at a revocation hearing?

    Q: What happens at a revocation hearing?

    A: At a revocation hearing, the judge determines whether or not the defendant admits guilt or pleas innocent to violating their parole or probation. This is legally termed the preliminary revocation hearing.
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  • What is the definition of "physical altercation"?

    Q: What is the definition of "physical altercation"?

    A: A physical altercation is defined as being an argument, dispute or altercation that involves force or physical aggression. Physical altercations differ from verbal altercations because physical contact is involved. These types of disputes are sometimes referred to as fights and may legally qualify as battery.
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  • Who were Bonnie and Clyde?

    Q: Who were Bonnie and Clyde?

    A: Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow were American criminals who committed multiple murders and robberies of gas stations, stores, and banks during the Great Depression of the 1930s, working their way across the country and hitting targets in Texas,
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  • Where is the safest place to live in the United States?

    Q: Where is the safest place to live in the United States?

    A: The safest city in the United States, based on its local crime rates, is Franklin, Mass. Franklin is located near Dover, Medfield and Norfolk. An average of 0.37 crimes per 1,000 residents occur in Franklin every year, as of September 2014.
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  • What is the safest city in the world?

    Q: What is the safest city in the world?

    A: The safest city in the world is Melbourne, Australia, which received a 97.5 out of 100 city score from the Economist Intelligence Unit. These city scores are based on criteria such as safety, quality of life, cleanliness, culture and affordability.
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  • What cult wore Nikes?

    Q: What cult wore Nikes?

    A: The Heaven's Gate suicide cult consisted of 39 people who committed simultaneous suicide en masse while wearing a uniform that included black and white Nike sneakers. This event took place on March 26, 1997 at a private residence in San Diego, California.
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  • What happens when a stolen car is recovered?

    Q: What happens when a stolen car is recovered?

    A: When the police recover a stolen car, it normally has damage from the thieves breaking into it, reckless driving or removal of anything of value, which the insurance company evaluates to determine if the car is a total loss. If its repair is feasible and the owner has comprehensive coverage, insurance typically pays to restore its previous condition.
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  • How do I investigate a person for free?

    Q: How do I investigate a person for free?

    A: The best way to investigate a person for free is to use a variety of methods, including Internet searches, public record searches and library research. Investigating people for free is possible, but such efforts often require you put in great amounts of work and effort to find the results you seek.
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  • What is an example of a modern day witch hunt?

    Q: What is an example of a modern day witch hunt?

    A: A modern day witch hunt is described by Care 2 as a situation where a mob mentality attacks someone or something while operating on dubious premises. It is essentially a situation where paranoia and suspicion are taken to another level through a mob mentality.
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  • What are the causes and effects of corruption?

    Q: What are the causes and effects of corruption?

    A: Greed, the desire for power and the wish to advance oneself in society are primary reasons for corruption. Corruption typically flourishes in societies in which there is a high value placed on money, power and station in life. Its effects might include instability, distrust and unjustness.
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  • What are the main causes of poaching?

    Q: What are the main causes of poaching?

    A: Poverty is one of the main reasons why people are motivated to poach, according to The Guardian. Corruption also drives poaching, particularly among corrupt officials and policemen. Traffickers and cartels also feed the poaching trade.
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  • What are the effects of invasion of privacy?

    Q: What are the effects of invasion of privacy?

    A: Privacy is a basic human need, and invasion of privacy can have serious psychological and emotional consequences, including paranoia, anxiety, depression and broken trust. Invasion of privacy is both a legal and an ethical issue.
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  • How old was Nelson Mandela when he went to jail?

    Q: How old was Nelson Mandela when he went to jail?

    A: Nelson Mandela was 44 years old when he first went to jail in 1962. Mandela was imprisoned for 28 years until his release on Feb. 11, 1990.
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  • What is rhino poaching?

    Q: What is rhino poaching?

    A: Rhino poaching refers to the illegal hunting of rhinoceros in Africa, primarily because of an increase in the demand for a traditional Chinese medicine that is made from the powder of rhinoceros horn. According to Save the Rhino, an animal that boasted a population of more than 500,000 throughout the world early in the 1900s is in danger of extinction, despite aggressive efforts to fight the practice of poaching. In 2011, the Western black rhino was declared to be extinct, primarily as a result of poaching.
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