Crime

A:

The Zodiac Killer was an unidentified serial killer who is believe to have operated during the late 1960s and early 1970s and is particularly famous for his or her habit of communicating with police and newspapers; the Zodiac Killer is known to have placed multiple calls to police departments, in addition to sending a series of coded messages to local newspapers. There are a total of five confirmed murders attributed to the Zodiac Killer, though the killer claimed in his or her communications with the media to have killed up to 37 individuals. The crimes that are attributed to the Zodiac Killer all took place in northern California, mostly around the San Francisco Bay Area, with the alleged murderer habitually contacting police departments and newspapers in that area.

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  • How many prisoners escape from jail each year?

    Q: How many prisoners escape from jail each year?

    A: The exact number of prisoners who escape varies from year to year, and in general, these numbers have been on the decline as time has progressed; for example, in 1993, the Bureau of Justice Statistics reported that one state had 14,305 escapes,
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  • What age group commits the most crimes?

    Q: What age group commits the most crimes?

    A: According to the book "A Primer on Social Problems," crime rates are higher for Americans in their late teens to early 20s. Those in the 15- to 24-year-old age group make up 40 percent of arrests but account for 14 percent of the population.
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  • What is strong arm robbery?

    Q: What is strong arm robbery?

    A: The Free Dictionary defines strong arm robbery as taking or stealing something from a person using force or threats but without using a weapon. Use of any weapon when committing a robbery, even if only used to threaten, is considered armed robbery.
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  • How did the Zodiac Killer communicate with police?

    Q: How did the Zodiac Killer communicate with police?

    A: The Zodiac Killer was an unidentified serial killer who is believe to have operated during the late 1960s and early 1970s and is particularly famous for his or her habit of communicating with police and newspapers; the Zodiac Killer is known to have placed multiple calls to police departments, in addition to sending a series of coded messages to local newspapers. There are a total of five confirmed murders attributed to the Zodiac Killer, though the killer claimed in his or her communications with the media to have killed up to 37 individuals. The crimes that are attributed to the Zodiac Killer all took place in northern California, mostly around the San Francisco Bay Area, with the alleged murderer habitually contacting police departments and newspapers in that area.
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  • Is pulling a fire alarm a felony?

    Q: Is pulling a fire alarm a felony?

    A: The first offense of pulling a fire alarm without cause is a misdemeanor. Repeat offenders can face felony charges. However, the first offense may result in felony charges if the prank results in injury or property damage.
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  • What states still use the electric chair?

    Q: What states still use the electric chair?

    A: As of September 2014, eight states still have electrocution available as an execution method, including Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Kentucky, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia. These states primarily use lethal injection for inmate executions, and the electric chair is used only at the convict's discretion in most jurisdictions. Nebraska used electrocution for executions until the Nebraska Supreme Court ruled the practice unconstitutional in 2008.
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  • What is an example of a modern day witch hunt?

    Q: What is an example of a modern day witch hunt?

    A: A modern day witch hunt is described by Care 2 as a situation where a mob mentality attacks someone or something while operating on dubious premises. It is essentially a situation where paranoia and suspicion are taken to another level through a mob mentality.
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  • What is the definition of "physical altercation"?

    Q: What is the definition of "physical altercation"?

    A: A physical altercation is defined as being an argument, dispute or altercation that involves force or physical aggression. Physical altercations differ from verbal altercations because physical contact is involved. These types of disputes are sometimes referred to as fights and may legally qualify as battery.
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  • Who were Bonnie and Clyde?

    Q: Who were Bonnie and Clyde?

    A: Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow were American criminals who committed multiple murders and robberies of gas stations, stores, and banks during the Great Depression of the 1930s, working their way across the country and hitting targets in Texas,
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  • What city is the murder capital per capita?

    Q: What city is the murder capital per capita?

    A: According to The Advocate, Flint, Mich., had the highest number of murders per capita in the United States in 2012. The data is based on the FBI's Crime in the United States report for 2012, released in mid-2013.
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  • How much money did Al Capone make?

    Q: How much money did Al Capone make?

    A: Al Capone, an American gangster, was speculated to have made around $100 million annually from his illegal enterprise. Al Capone inherited his business from a mentor in Chicago named Johnny Torrio. Torrio left his own business to Al Capone to run and returned to Italy.
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  • What is first degree burglary?

    Q: What is first degree burglary?

    A: First degree burglary is defined as forcibly breaking and entering into someone's home, while persons are in the home, with the sole intent of committing a crime, as stated by attorney Adam R. Banner. The offender forcibly gains entry by breaking a door, window, wall, locks or bolts.
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  • How long does a felony stay on your record?

    Q: How long does a felony stay on your record?

    A: A felony stays on a person's criminal record forever, according to Attorneys.com. A person can apply to have a felony conviction expunged from their record. If the court rules that the conviction is to be expunged, the felony record is sealed.
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  • What is a citation from the police?

    Q: What is a citation from the police?

    A: A citation from a police officer is a legal document that serves as a notice to appear in court in response to a charge against an individual. These kinds of summons are used in financial liability situations, traffic incidents and other legal proceedings where a warrant is not issued. Citations include the name of the officer, the matter the document relates to and the date and time to appear.
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  • Who opened the Flamingo casino?

    Q: Who opened the Flamingo casino?

    A: A gambling magnate and crime boss named Benjamin "Bugsy" Siegel is responsible for founding the Flamingo Las Vegas, a luxury resort hotel and casino that was opened in 1946 and is still operational as of 2015. Bugsy Siegel is often credited as being one of the founders of modern Las Vegas as a gambling and resort destination, thanks in part to his role in founding the Flamingo.
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  • Which is the bigger caliber: .357 or .45?

    Q: Which is the bigger caliber: .357 or .45?

    A: HowStuffWorks explains that a .45 caliber bullet is slightly larger than a .357 caliber bullet. Caliber refers to the diameter of a bullet or barrel in inches, which means that the .45 bullet is approximately .093 inches larger than the .357 round.
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  • What are the main causes of poaching?

    Q: What are the main causes of poaching?

    A: Poverty is one of the main reasons why people are motivated to poach, according to The Guardian. Corruption also drives poaching, particularly among corrupt officials and policemen. Traffickers and cartels also feed the poaching trade.
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  • What happened to Jimmy Hoffa?

    Q: What happened to Jimmy Hoffa?

    A: Controversial labor leader Jimmy Hoffa disappeared in the summer of 1975, and despite great public and official interest, there is no substantial or reliable trace of his whereabouts or ultimate fate. There are a number of theories on the subject, ranging from the fantastic, such as the idea that Hoffa's body is encased within concrete at New Jersey's Giants Stadium, to the mundane, such as the theory that Hoffa was murdered and then dumped in a swampy area of Florida.
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  • What is the difference between larceny and theft?

    Q: What is the difference between larceny and theft?

    A: The difference between larceny and theft is that larceny is the wrongful taking of tangible property while theft includes the theft and use of intellectual and intangible property. Both acts are considered crimes and are punishable by law in all states.
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  • What happens when a stolen car is recovered?

    Q: What happens when a stolen car is recovered?

    A: When the police recover a stolen car, it normally has damage from the thieves breaking into it, reckless driving or removal of anything of value, which the insurance company evaluates to determine if the car is a total loss. If its repair is feasible and the owner has comprehensive coverage, insurance typically pays to restore its previous condition.
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  • What happens at a revocation hearing?

    Q: What happens at a revocation hearing?

    A: At a revocation hearing, the judge determines whether or not the defendant admits guilt or pleas innocent to violating their parole or probation. This is legally termed the preliminary revocation hearing.
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