Crime

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According to Avvo, Class 4 felonies in Arizona include theft, possession of narcotics, possession of dangerous drugs, forgery, identity theft, weapons misconduct and driving under the influence. The Law Offices of David Cantor list computer crimes, such as tampering and possession of an unauthorized access device, as Class 4 felonies.

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  • What is rhino poaching?

    Q: What is rhino poaching?

    A: Rhino poaching refers to the illegal hunting of rhinoceros in Africa, primarily because of an increase in the demand for a traditional Chinese medicine that is made from the powder of rhinoceros horn. According to Save the Rhino, an animal that boasted a population of more than 500,000 throughout the world early in the 1900s is in danger of extinction, despite aggressive efforts to fight the practice of poaching. In 2011, the Western black rhino was declared to be extinct, primarily as a result of poaching.
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  • Was Frank Sinatra in the mafia?

    Q: Was Frank Sinatra in the mafia?

    A: There is no evidence that Frank Sinatra actually participated in organized crime, but there is plenty of evidence showing that Sinatra has social connections to people who participated in organized crime. Whether this makes Sinatra guilty by association seems to be more of a matter of opinion than fact.
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  • What crime was Al Capone convicted of?

    Q: What crime was Al Capone convicted of?

    A: The notorious American gangster Al Capone committed a litany of crimes, but it was a tax evasion charge that finally brought him down, leading to a prison sentence of 11 years that he served starting in 1932. Capone was already sufferi
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  • Where is the safest place to live in the United States?

    Q: Where is the safest place to live in the United States?

    A: The safest city in the United States, based on its local crime rates, is Franklin, Mass. Franklin is located near Dover, Medfield and Norfolk. An average of 0.37 crimes per 1,000 residents occur in Franklin every year, as of September 2014.
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  • What is a chronic offender?

    Q: What is a chronic offender?

    A: A chronic offender is a person with multiple criminal convictions spread across multiple criminal events. Chronic offenders are responsible for a significant fraction of both property and violent crimes, according to the Minnesota Office of the Legislative Auditor. Many states have sentencing guidelines that give chronic offenders lengthy sentences.
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  • What city is the murder capital per capita?

    Q: What city is the murder capital per capita?

    A: According to The Advocate, Flint, Mich., had the highest number of murders per capita in the United States in 2012. The data is based on the FBI's Crime in the United States report for 2012, released in mid-2013.
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  • What crimes did the Manson family commit?

    Q: What crimes did the Manson family commit?

    A: The Manson family, a loosely organized social group centered around a supposed guru or spiritual leader named Charles Manson, had multiple members who have been found guilty of a variety of crimes, from the murder of actress Sharon Tate to an assassination attempt on President Gerald Ford. The latter crime was committed by a Manson family member named Lynette "Squeaky" Fromme, who served 34 years in prison for her attempt on President Ford's life in 1975.
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  • What happens if you lie under oath?

    Q: What happens if you lie under oath?

    A: If you lie in a sworn statement or under oath in a court of law, you commit perjury and can face criminal charges, according to FindLaw, a leader in online legal services and information. Under federal and state laws, penalties include fines, probation or imprisonment for up to five years. If you are in law enforcement, public service or in service to the courts and convicted of perjury, your employment can be terminated.
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  • Who opened the Flamingo casino?

    Q: Who opened the Flamingo casino?

    A: A gambling magnate and crime boss named Benjamin "Bugsy" Siegel is responsible for founding the Flamingo Las Vegas, a luxury resort hotel and casino that was opened in 1946 and is still operational as of 2015. Bugsy Siegel is often credited as being one of the founders of modern Las Vegas as a gambling and resort destination, thanks in part to his role in founding the Flamingo.
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  • Should juveniles be tried as adults?

    Q: Should juveniles be tried as adults?

    A: According to the Equal Justice Initiative, for certain criminal offenses, children are allowed to be tried as adults in every state. Although there is dissent about trying juveniles as adults, many organizations are fighting against it because they maintain that it does more harm than good.
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  • What is strong arm robbery?

    Q: What is strong arm robbery?

    A: The Free Dictionary defines strong arm robbery as taking or stealing something from a person using force or threats but without using a weapon. Use of any weapon when committing a robbery, even if only used to threaten, is considered armed robbery.
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  • What are some Mob nicknames?

    Q: What are some Mob nicknames?

    A: Members of the Italian-American mafia tend to receive clever or seemingly funny nicknames, including Anthony "Tony Bagels" Cavezza, Giuseppe "Pooch" Destefano, Christopher "Burger" Reynolds, Anthony "Baby Fat Larry" Durso and Joseph "Junior Lollipops" Carna. These are just a few of the nicknames culled from FBI documents associated with a massive 2011 mafia bust in New York.
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  • What states still use the electric chair?

    Q: What states still use the electric chair?

    A: As of September 2014, eight states still have electrocution available as an execution method, including Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Kentucky, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia. These states primarily use lethal injection for inmate executions, and the electric chair is used only at the convict's discretion in most jurisdictions. Nebraska used electrocution for executions until the Nebraska Supreme Court ruled the practice unconstitutional in 2008.
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  • How old was Nelson Mandela when he went to jail?

    Q: How old was Nelson Mandela when he went to jail?

    A: Nelson Mandela was 44 years old when he first went to jail in 1962. Mandela was imprisoned for 28 years until his release on Feb. 11, 1990.
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  • What are the causes of crime in South Africa?

    Q: What are the causes of crime in South Africa?

    A: Most South Africans believe that the major cause of crime in South Africa is poverty. However, recent studies suggest that social structures emerging from the apartheid era may actually be the primary driving force for many of the crimes within the nation.
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  • What are the Mafia's ties to Italy?

    Q: What are the Mafia's ties to Italy?

    A: The concept of a mafia has deep ties to Italy, with the word "mafia" first being used to describe independent paramilitary groups on the Italian island of Sicily, and while Italian-American mafias generally operate as sovereign entities, these organizations take cultural influence from Italy. For example, though American mobsters typically do not have direct connections to Italian mafia members, Italian-American mafias tend to use Italian mafia words and concepts such as "omerta," a code of conduct that forbids mafia members from providing information to the government. The word "mafia" itself has strong ties to Italy; though the word has taken on an English meaning, "mafia" is a Sicilian Italian word, an adjective that describes a blend of elegance and courage.
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  • How do I investigate a person for free?

    Q: How do I investigate a person for free?

    A: The best way to investigate a person for free is to use a variety of methods, including Internet searches, public record searches and library research. Investigating people for free is possible, but such efforts often require you put in great amounts of work and effort to find the results you seek.
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  • Why was Al Capone known as a modern day Robin Hood?

    Q: Why was Al Capone known as a modern day Robin Hood?

    A: Al Capone was referred to as a "Robin Hood" figure because he gave so much money to charities before he went to jail. The public's fascination with and, at times, admiration of Capone is part of the complex story of one of America's first famous criminals, who, despite his well-known participation in illicit activities, was widely respected.
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  • What cult wore Nikes?

    Q: What cult wore Nikes?

    A: The Heaven's Gate suicide cult consisted of 39 people who committed simultaneous suicide en masse while wearing a uniform that included black and white Nike sneakers. This event took place on March 26, 1997 at a private residence in San Diego, California.
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  • What are some statistics on serial killers?

    Q: What are some statistics on serial killers?

    A: In the United States, a majority of known and reported serial killers are Caucasian males in their 20s and 30s. Though white males comprise the majority of reported serial killer cases, according to the FBI they are not statistically more likely to be serial killers. Approximately 40 percent of reported and documented serial killers between 1900 and 2010 were African American.
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  • What is considered third-degree assault in Connecticut?

    Q: What is considered third-degree assault in Connecticut?

    A: According to the Connecticut General Assembly, third-degree assault is discussed in chapter 952 of the Connecticut Penal Code. Assault in the third degree is a class A misdemeanor. Connecticut attorney Erin Field explains that it is defined as intentionally causing injury or recklessly causing serious injury. With criminal negligence, it is defined as causing serious physical injury with a deadly weapon.
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