Crime

A:

HowStuffWorks explains that a .45 caliber bullet is slightly larger than a .357 caliber bullet. Caliber refers to the diameter of a bullet or barrel in inches, which means that the .45 bullet is approximately .093 inches larger than the .357 round.

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  • Which is the bigger caliber: .357 or .45?

    Q: Which is the bigger caliber: .357 or .45?

    A: HowStuffWorks explains that a .45 caliber bullet is slightly larger than a .357 caliber bullet. Caliber refers to the diameter of a bullet or barrel in inches, which means that the .45 bullet is approximately .093 inches larger than the .357 round.
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  • What is considered third-degree assault in Connecticut?

    Q: What is considered third-degree assault in Connecticut?

    A: According to the Connecticut General Assembly, third-degree assault is discussed in chapter 952 of the Connecticut Penal Code. Assault in the third degree is a class A misdemeanor. Connecticut attorney Erin Field explains that it is defined as intentionally causing injury or recklessly causing serious injury. With criminal negligence, it is defined as causing serious physical injury with a deadly weapon.
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  • What are some Mob nicknames?

    Q: What are some Mob nicknames?

    A: Members of the Italian-American mafia tend to receive clever or seemingly funny nicknames, including Anthony "Tony Bagels" Cavezza, Giuseppe "Pooch" Destefano, Christopher "Burger" Reynolds, Anthony "Baby Fat Larry" Durso and Joseph "Junior Lollipops" Carna. These are just a few of the nicknames culled from FBI documents associated with a massive 2011 mafia bust in New York.
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  • What is a chronic offender?

    Q: What is a chronic offender?

    A: A chronic offender is a person with multiple criminal convictions spread across multiple criminal events. Chronic offenders are responsible for a significant fraction of both property and violent crimes, according to the Minnesota Office of the Legislative Auditor. Many states have sentencing guidelines that give chronic offenders lengthy sentences.
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  • What are the causes of teenage crime?

    Q: What are the causes of teenage crime?

    A: According to the Ontario Ministry of Child and Youth Services, the causes of teenage or youth crimes are numerous. Prominent causes include economic deprivation, psychological causes and media perception.
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  • What happens at a revocation hearing?

    Q: What happens at a revocation hearing?

    A: At a revocation hearing, the judge determines whether or not the defendant admits guilt or pleas innocent to violating their parole or probation. This is legally termed the preliminary revocation hearing.
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  • What is a non-violent crime?

    Q: What is a non-violent crime?

    A: A non-violent crime is any crime that does not involve the use of force or cause injury to another person. Non-violent crimes are often judged in terms of property damage or loss to the victim.
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  • What is rhino poaching?

    Q: What is rhino poaching?

    A: Rhino poaching refers to the illegal hunting of rhinoceros in Africa, primarily because of an increase in the demand for a traditional Chinese medicine that is made from the powder of rhinoceros horn. According to Save the Rhino, an animal that boasted a population of more than 500,000 throughout the world early in the 1900s is in danger of extinction, despite aggressive efforts to fight the practice of poaching. In 2011, the Western black rhino was declared to be extinct, primarily as a result of poaching.
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  • What age group commits the most crimes?

    Q: What age group commits the most crimes?

    A: According to the book "A Primer on Social Problems," crime rates are higher for Americans in their late teens to early 20s. Those in the 15- to 24-year-old age group make up 40 percent of arrests but account for 14 percent of the population.
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  • Who opened the Flamingo casino?

    Q: Who opened the Flamingo casino?

    A: A gambling magnate and crime boss named Benjamin "Bugsy" Siegel is responsible for founding the Flamingo Las Vegas, a luxury resort hotel and casino that was opened in 1946 and is still operational as of 2015. Bugsy Siegel is often credited as being one of the founders of modern Las Vegas as a gambling and resort destination, thanks in part to his role in founding the Flamingo.
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  • What city has the highest crime rate in America?

    Q: What city has the highest crime rate in America?

    A: According to Neighborhoodscout.com, an online crime statistics resource, East Saint Louis, IL is the most dangerous city in the United States thanks to its high rates of violent crimes and property theft. However, the FBI cautions agai
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  • What is the Jonestown Massacre?

    Q: What is the Jonestown Massacre?

    A: The Jonestown massacre is a mass death event that took place on November 18, 1978, at Jonestown, the Guyanese compound operated by the People's Temple religious organization and named for the Temple's leader, an American man named Jim Jones. More than 900 people died during this mass death, with deaths resulting from consumption of a cocktail of cyanide, a poison, and prescription drugs such diazepam, chloral hydrate and promethazine, all of which were mixed together with flavored drink concentrate to create a purple liquid.
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  • What cult wore Nikes?

    Q: What cult wore Nikes?

    A: The Heaven's Gate suicide cult consisted of 39 people who committed simultaneous suicide en masse while wearing a uniform that included black and white Nike sneakers. This event took place on March 26, 1997 at a private residence in San Diego, California.
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  • What is first degree burglary?

    Q: What is first degree burglary?

    A: First degree burglary is defined as forcibly breaking and entering into someone's home, while persons are in the home, with the sole intent of committing a crime, as stated by attorney Adam R. Banner. The offender forcibly gains entry by breaking a door, window, wall, locks or bolts.
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  • What is the difference between larceny and theft?

    Q: What is the difference between larceny and theft?

    A: The difference between larceny and theft is that larceny is the wrongful taking of tangible property while theft includes the theft and use of intellectual and intangible property. Both acts are considered crimes and are punishable by law in all states.
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  • Why was Frank Sinatra arrested?

    Q: Why was Frank Sinatra arrested?

    A: In 1938, the singer Frank Sinatra was arrested twice for what the New York Times describes as "sex crimes." First, in late November, he was arrested on charges of seduction, and second, in late December, he was arrested on charges of adultery. Both of these charges were later dismissed.
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  • Should juveniles be tried as adults?

    Q: Should juveniles be tried as adults?

    A: According to the Equal Justice Initiative, for certain criminal offenses, children are allowed to be tried as adults in every state. Although there is dissent about trying juveniles as adults, many organizations are fighting against it because they maintain that it does more harm than good.
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  • What happens if you lie under oath?

    Q: What happens if you lie under oath?

    A: If you lie in a sworn statement or under oath in a court of law, you commit perjury and can face criminal charges, according to FindLaw, a leader in online legal services and information. Under federal and state laws, penalties include fines, probation or imprisonment for up to five years. If you are in law enforcement, public service or in service to the courts and convicted of perjury, your employment can be terminated.
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  • What happened to Jimmy Hoffa?

    Q: What happened to Jimmy Hoffa?

    A: Controversial labor leader Jimmy Hoffa disappeared in the summer of 1975, and despite great public and official interest, there is no substantial or reliable trace of his whereabouts or ultimate fate. There are a number of theories on the subject, ranging from the fantastic, such as the idea that Hoffa's body is encased within concrete at New Jersey's Giants Stadium, to the mundane, such as the theory that Hoffa was murdered and then dumped in a swampy area of Florida.
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  • What city is the murder capital per capita?

    Q: What city is the murder capital per capita?

    A: According to The Advocate, Flint, Mich., had the highest number of murders per capita in the United States in 2012. The data is based on the FBI's Crime in the United States report for 2012, released in mid-2013.
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  • What happens when a stolen car is recovered?

    Q: What happens when a stolen car is recovered?

    A: When the police recover a stolen car, it normally has damage from the thieves breaking into it, reckless driving or removal of anything of value, which the insurance company evaluates to determine if the car is a total loss. If its repair is feasible and the owner has comprehensive coverage, insurance typically pays to restore its previous condition.
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