Crime

A:

The safest city in the United States, based on its local crime rates, is Franklin, Mass. Franklin is located near Dover, Medfield and Norfolk. An average of 0.37 crimes per 1,000 residents occur in Franklin every year, as of September 2014.

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  • What is a non-violent crime?

    Q: What is a non-violent crime?

    A: A non-violent crime is any crime that does not involve the use of force or cause injury to another person. Non-violent crimes are often judged in terms of property damage or loss to the victim.
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  • What states still use the electric chair?

    Q: What states still use the electric chair?

    A: As of September 2014, eight states still have electrocution available as an execution method, including Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Kentucky, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia. These states primarily use lethal injection for inmate executions, and the electric chair is used only at the convict's discretion in most jurisdictions. Nebraska used electrocution for executions until the Nebraska Supreme Court ruled the practice unconstitutional in 2008.
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  • Where is the safest place to live in the United States?

    Q: Where is the safest place to live in the United States?

    A: The safest city in the United States, based on its local crime rates, is Franklin, Mass. Franklin is located near Dover, Medfield and Norfolk. An average of 0.37 crimes per 1,000 residents occur in Franklin every year, as of September 2014.
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  • What is the California dog bite law?

    Q: What is the California dog bite law?

    A: California has strict liability statutes against dog owners in the case of a dog bite. The dog owner is fully liable for injuries sustained to another person if his dog bites them, whether the victim was on public or private property.
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  • What are the main causes of poaching?

    Q: What are the main causes of poaching?

    A: Poverty is one of the main reasons why people are motivated to poach, according to The Guardian. Corruption also drives poaching, particularly among corrupt officials and policemen. Traffickers and cartels also feed the poaching trade.
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  • What are the causes and effects of corruption?

    Q: What are the causes and effects of corruption?

    A: Greed, the desire for power and the wish to advance oneself in society are primary reasons for corruption. Corruption typically flourishes in societies in which there is a high value placed on money, power and station in life. Its effects might include instability, distrust and unjustness.
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  • What are some statistics on serial killers?

    Q: What are some statistics on serial killers?

    A: In the United States, a majority of known and reported serial killers are Caucasian males in their 20s and 30s. Though white males comprise the majority of reported serial killer cases, according to the FBI they are not statistically more likely to be serial killers. Approximately 40 percent of reported and documented serial killers between 1900 and 2010 were African American.
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  • What is rhino poaching?

    Q: What is rhino poaching?

    A: Rhino poaching refers to the illegal hunting of rhinoceros in Africa, primarily because of an increase in the demand for a traditional Chinese medicine that is made from the powder of rhinoceros horn. According to Save the Rhino, an animal that boasted a population of more than 500,000 throughout the world early in the 1900s is in danger of extinction, despite aggressive efforts to fight the practice of poaching. In 2011, the Western black rhino was declared to be extinct, primarily as a result of poaching.
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  • What is the Jonestown Massacre?

    Q: What is the Jonestown Massacre?

    A: The Jonestown massacre is a mass death event that took place on November 18, 1978, at Jonestown, the Guyanese compound operated by the People's Temple religious organization and named for the Temple's leader, an American man named Jim Jones. More than 900 people died during this mass death, with deaths resulting from consumption of a cocktail of cyanide, a poison, and prescription drugs such diazepam, chloral hydrate and promethazine, all of which were mixed together with flavored drink concentrate to create a purple liquid.
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  • Who were Bonnie and Clyde?

    Q: Who were Bonnie and Clyde?

    A: Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow were American criminals who committed multiple murders and robberies of gas stations, stores, and banks during the Great Depression of the 1930s, working their way across the country and hitting targets in Texas,
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  • Is pulling a fire alarm a felony?

    Q: Is pulling a fire alarm a felony?

    A: The first offense of pulling a fire alarm without cause is a misdemeanor. Repeat offenders can face felony charges. However, the first offense may result in felony charges if the prank results in injury or property damage.
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  • What crimes did the Manson family commit?

    Q: What crimes did the Manson family commit?

    A: The Manson family, a loosely organized social group centered around a supposed guru or spiritual leader named Charles Manson, had multiple members who have been found guilty of a variety of crimes, from the murder of actress Sharon Tate to an assassination attempt on President Gerald Ford. The latter crime was committed by a Manson family member named Lynette "Squeaky" Fromme, who served 34 years in prison for her attempt on President Ford's life in 1975.
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  • What are the causes of crime in South Africa?

    Q: What are the causes of crime in South Africa?

    A: Most South Africans believe that the major cause of crime in South Africa is poverty. However, recent studies suggest that social structures emerging from the apartheid era may actually be the primary driving force for many of the crimes within the nation.
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  • What is a Class 4 felony in Arizona?

    Q: What is a Class 4 felony in Arizona?

    A: According to Avvo, Class 4 felonies in Arizona include theft, possession of narcotics, possession of dangerous drugs, forgery, identity theft, weapons misconduct and driving under the influence. The Law Offices of David Cantor list computer crimes, such as tampering and possession of an unauthorized access device, as Class 4 felonies.
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  • What is the minimum sentence for arson?

    Q: What is the minimum sentence for arson?

    A: As of 2011, in the United States, the minimum sentence for Arson is three to five years in prison and a $15,000 fine. This sentence is for arson in the third degree, which encompasses fires not intentionally set that caused significant bodily harm or damage.
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  • What is strong arm robbery?

    Q: What is strong arm robbery?

    A: The Free Dictionary defines strong arm robbery as taking or stealing something from a person using force or threats but without using a weapon. Use of any weapon when committing a robbery, even if only used to threaten, is considered armed robbery.
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  • What are five elements of fraud?

    Q: What are five elements of fraud?

    A: To demonstrate that fraud has taken place, an investigator or prosecutor must establish five conditions. These are that facts have been misrepresented, the misrepresented facts were material to the transaction and were intended to be relied upon, the victim justifiably relied upon the misrepresentation, and material harm resulted.
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  • How and why was the Mafia formed?

    Q: How and why was the Mafia formed?

    A: There is some evidence to suggest that the original group known as a "mafia" was an unofficial organization of residents on the Italian island of Sicily who grouped together to form paramilitary groups in order to defend their small island home from invaders. This militaristic origin may be responsible for the formal organizational structure, which relies on a top-down leadership structure and strict adherence to the word of superiors. However, it may be difficult to know exactly what the origins of the Sicilian mafia are, due to the mafia's code of omerta, which demands that members keep mafia activities a secret from outsiders, particularly those in positions of legal authority.
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  • How did the Zodiac Killer communicate with police?

    Q: How did the Zodiac Killer communicate with police?

    A: The Zodiac Killer was an unidentified serial killer who is believe to have operated during the late 1960s and early 1970s and is particularly famous for his or her habit of communicating with police and newspapers; the Zodiac Killer is known to have placed multiple calls to police departments, in addition to sending a series of coded messages to local newspapers. There are a total of five confirmed murders attributed to the Zodiac Killer, though the killer claimed in his or her communications with the media to have killed up to 37 individuals. The crimes that are attributed to the Zodiac Killer all took place in northern California, mostly around the San Francisco Bay Area, with the alleged murderer habitually contacting police departments and newspapers in that area.
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  • What are some Mob nicknames?

    Q: What are some Mob nicknames?

    A: Members of the Italian-American mafia tend to receive clever or seemingly funny nicknames, including Anthony "Tony Bagels" Cavezza, Giuseppe "Pooch" Destefano, Christopher "Burger" Reynolds, Anthony "Baby Fat Larry" Durso and Joseph "Junior Lollipops" Carna. These are just a few of the nicknames culled from FBI documents associated with a massive 2011 mafia bust in New York.
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  • What is first degree burglary?

    Q: What is first degree burglary?

    A: First degree burglary is defined as forcibly breaking and entering into someone's home, while persons are in the home, with the sole intent of committing a crime, as stated by attorney Adam R. Banner. The offender forcibly gains entry by breaking a door, window, wall, locks or bolts.
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