Child Support & Custody

A:

The purpose of a child custody letter is to provide evidence to the court or mediator that the parent seeking custody is fit, according to LegalZoom. Fitness generally indicates that the party can act for the best interests of the child.

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  • What is the purpose of a child custody letter?

    Q: What is the purpose of a child custody letter?

    A: The purpose of a child custody letter is to provide evidence to the court or mediator that the parent seeking custody is fit, according to LegalZoom. Fitness generally indicates that the party can act for the best interests of the child.
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  • What are a father's rights to see his child?

    Q: What are a father's rights to see his child?

    A: By law, child custody and visitation rights for fathers are identical to those of mothers in every state. While mothers and fathers are technically equal under the law, About.com notes that fathers' visitation rights can sometimes be harder to exercise and enforce.
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  • Can I legally move out at 16?

    Q: Can I legally move out at 16?

    A: Under specific circumstances, it may be possible for 16-year-old minors to move out of their parents' homes, according to the Legal Information Institute of Cornell University Law School. The process of legally moving out at such a young age is called emancipation, and it is only granted in certain cases.
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  • Do grandparents get visitation rights?

    Q: Do grandparents get visitation rights?

    A: As the American Association of Retired Persons explains, grandparents do not have automatic visitation rights to see their grandchildren; however, some states allow grandparents to petition the court to grant visitation rights in specific situations. The criteria used by courts to grant visitation to grandparents varies by state but generally take into account the marital status of the parents and the prior relationship between the grandparent and grandchild.
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  • How do you write a child support agreement letter?

    Q: How do you write a child support agreement letter?

    A: To write a child support agreement letter, determine the amount of support that legislation prescribes based on location and income. Contact the other parent or their lawyer to ensure that they are in agreement with these terms. Then, write a letter to a judge, the other parent's lawyer or the parent themselves stating the amount to be paid and when payments shall be made, as reported by Find Law.
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  • What is a stepfather?

    Q: What is a stepfather?

    A: A stepfather is the husband of someone's mother by a later marriage. If a mother gets a divorce from the child's father or becomes a widow, she may marry another man who becomes her child's stepfather.
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  • What is in a sample custody letter?

    Q: What is in a sample custody letter?

    A: According to law firm Ciyou & Dixon, PC, five things should be in a custody letter: complete contact information for anyone providing a character reference, photographs, a timeline of events, recorded conversations (texts or emails) and explanatory letters.
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  • What are the rights of unmarried fathers?

    Q: What are the rights of unmarried fathers?

    A: In general, an unmarried father who has established legal paternity can ask the courts to approve a part-time living arrangement and an equal say in child-rearing decisions. He may also have the right to visitations. In cases where the mother is deemed unfit, an unmarried father may be able to seek sole legal and physical custody.
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  • Can you still get child support if the father does not sign the birth certificate?

    Q: Can you still get child support if the father does not sign the birth certificate?

    A: Each state has its own laws regarding child support and paternity, but in general, a court has the discretion to order a man not named on the birth certificate to pay child support. Paternity of the father can be established after the birth. If a woman files a claim for child support through social services, the agency makes an attempt to establish paternity through DNA testing.
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  • What are the laws regarding child support in Georgia?

    Q: What are the laws regarding child support in Georgia?

    A: All Georgia parents are required to provide adequate support for their minor children, according to Fulton Superior Court. As of 2007, child support in Georgia is calculated using the income of both parents, taking into consideration previous child support orders, which parent is the custodial or non-custodial parent, the proportion of income earned by each parent, the number of children and special circumstances, such as medical needs, according to Nolo.
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  • Where can I find information on adoption?

    Q: Where can I find information on adoption?

    A: The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Child Welfare Information Gateway is an excellent online tool to get started when looking for information on adoption. The gateway features information on domestic and inter-country adoption. Its resources contain a wealth of information on adopting, especially from the U.S. Foster Care System.
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  • Am I entitled to child care costs?

    Q: Am I entitled to child care costs?

    A: According to Child Care Aware, individuals might be entitled to child care costs depending on a number of factors and circumstances. For the 2013 tax year, there are Child Tax Credits available for families with earned income less than $51,567.
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  • How long do you have to pay child support?

    Q: How long do you have to pay child support?

    A: In the United States, the length of time someone must pay child support is governed by the state, not the federal government. The length of child support obligations is dependent on the relevant laws of their particular state.
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  • Q: Is there such a thing as "grandparent rights" in California?

    A: Grandparents sometimes have visitation rights in the state of California, according to the California Judicial Branch. There are required circumstances that must be met for these rights to be awarded.
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  • Q: What are my legal rights as a parent with my 17-year-old son?

    A: According to the Connecticut General Assembly, parents are legally and financially responsible for their offspring until the age of 18. Parents are required to care for 17-year-old children and make major decisions including marriage, enlistment in the armed forces and major medical treatment. They must use reasonable force to control the behavior of their 17-year-old children. Parents can also engage law enforcement if the minor runs away from home.
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  • Q: How can you get information about child support?

    A: The Office of Child Support Enforcement is a good place to start for finding information about child support, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The agency offers detailed information for parents, both the parent owing child support and the parent receiving it.
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  • Q: What does "remand in custody" mean?

    A: "Remand in custody" means that a prisoner is sent back to jail. According to the New York State Unified Court System, prisoners and those who have been accused of a crime before a court of law can be remanded to jail.
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  • Q: What is the statue of limitations on child support?

    A: The statute of limitations on child support requires a delinquent non-custodial parent to pay child support arrears even when the child reaches the age of majority, and generally varies by state, according to HG.org. Some states provide requirements for collection of arrearages based on the last payment’s due date.
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  • Q: How do you find out how much child support is owed to a child?

    A: The method for checking the owed amount of child support differs between states, but can include viewing online accounts, calling the clerk of the court for the specific municipality or contacting the Department of Children and Family Services or similar agency for the state, as noted by CA.gov. This information is only available to parties involved in the child support case, lawyers and law enforcement.
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  • Q: How do you draft a custody agreement?

    A: In drafting a custody agreement, both parties involved should outline legal and physical custody, financial obligations, visitation schedules and transportation arrangements, according to About.com. Agreements that are not clear and concise may be altered by the court.
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  • Q: How can you find child support guidelines for Texas?

    A: As of December 2015, child support guidelines for Texas are on the website for the Texas Attorney General, TexasAttorneyGeneral.gov. The Frequently Asked Questions page explains many of the ground rules for the state, such as what the child support system is, what is it able to do, who is permitted to apply and where to file for support. FAQs also cover what information the attorney general's office needs to locate noncustodial parents and time variations for receiving child support.
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