Branches of Government

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The primary check the president has on Congress is the ability to veto legislation. The president can also choose to implement legislation in a manner Congress did not intend. Executive orders also give the president significant power.

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  • How Many People Are in the U.S. Senate?

    Q: How Many People Are in the U.S. Senate?

    A: One hundred people serve in the Senate of the United States. Each of the 50 states is guaranteed two Senators. The District of Columbia does not have a U.S. Senator, nor do any of the U.S. territories.
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  • What Is the Role of the National Government?

    Q: What Is the Role of the National Government?

    A: The role of any national government is to protect the safety and well-being of its citizens and the sovereignty of the country's borders. National government is authorized to act based on a legal constitution, federal laws and accepted civil standards. All citizens benefit from agencies and programs created by national government.
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  • What Is the Difference Between Federal and State Governments?

    Q: What Is the Difference Between Federal and State Governments?

    A: The federal government, under the powers of the U.S. Constitution, is given the power to make laws, veto laws, oversee foreign policy and national defense, impose tariffs, impeach officials, enter into treaties, interpret the Constitution, interpret laws and revise laws that allow one state to impede on the rights of another. Beyond that, the 10th amendment gives power to the states to govern themselves.
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  • What Are the Duties of the U.S. Senate?

    Q: What Are the Duties of the U.S. Senate?

    A: The U.S. Senate proposes and considers new laws, approves or rejects presidential nominations, provides advice and consent on international treaties, and serves as the high court for impeachment trials. Although the U.S. House of Representatives also works on new legislation, only the Senate performs the other three duties.
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  • What Is Judicial Power?

    Q: What Is Judicial Power?

    A: Judicial power involves constitutional authority assigned to courts and judges, according to the Free Dictionary. The authority enables them to interpret and apply the law, arbitrate legal disputes and carry out justice.
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  • What Are the President's Advisors Called?

    Q: What Are the President's Advisors Called?

    A: The President's advisors are known as the Cabinet. The role of the Cabinet is to advise the president on subjects related to the duties of each member's office.
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  • Why Is Barack Obama a Good Leader?

    Q: Why Is Barack Obama a Good Leader?

    A: President Barack Obama is a good leader because he is perceptive. As the leader of the free world, President Barack Obama rallies for the people. He understands that the United States can only work as a unit when everyone has the same opportunities in healthcare, education and employment.
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  • Who Determines the President's Salary?

    Q: Who Determines the President's Salary?

    A: Congress determines the president's salary. However, according to Article II, Section 1 of the United States Constitution, Congress may not change the president's salary while the president is in office.
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  • Do Judges Make Law?

    Q: Do Judges Make Law?

    A: Judges are not responsible for making laws. Judges are responsible for interpreting laws, assessing any evidence presented and imposing penalties while remaining impartial in their rulings to ensure justice is fairly served.
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  • How Long Is a Senator's Term in Office?

    Q: How Long Is a Senator's Term in Office?

    A: United States senators serve 6-year terms, although they may seek reelection after each term, and there is no formal or official limit to the number of years or terms a senator may serve. Senators may resign voluntarily or opt to not seek reelection, and they can also be formally expelled by the Senate in the case of wrongdoing; in these cases, two-thirds of the Senate must vote for expulsion, and it is very rare for this process to occur. Each senator serves alongside a fellow senator from the same state, and each state in the union is accorded two Senate seats, as are two unofficial "shadow senators" from the District of Columbia.
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  • What Are the Express Powers of Congress?

    Q: What Are the Express Powers of Congress?

    A: The express powers of Congress are those powers granted specifically in the United States Constitution, which include the ability to make laws, amend the Constitution and declare war. Additionally, Congress is also responsible for the United States Postal Service. The House of Representatives also has ability to initiate tax laws and call for the impeachment of government officials. The Senate approves all Presidential appointments and tries government officials for impeachment.
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  • Who Serves As President of the Senate in the Vice President's Absence?

    Q: Who Serves As President of the Senate in the Vice President's Absence?

    A: The president pro tempore is the senatorial official who serves as president of the Senate when the vice president is absent. President pro tempore means "president for a time."
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  • What Are Examples of Judicial Power?

    Q: What Are Examples of Judicial Power?

    A: The judicial system's power relies on the structure of checks and balances in government. The judicial branch of government includes the Supreme Court, courts of appeal and district courts. The judicial branch checks both the executive and legislative branch, but it also follows balances from these two branches. It has the power to enforce law and order and protect the rights of the citizenry.
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  • How Can Hillary Clinton Be Contacted?

    Q: How Can Hillary Clinton Be Contacted?

    A: Hillary Clinton can be contacted through her website, www.hillaryclinton.com, Twitter, Facebook and Instagram. Contact requests can also be made through her mailing address: Hillary Rodham Clinton, Post Office Box 5256, New York, NJ 10185.
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  • How Does a Bill Move Through the U.S. House of Representatives?

    Q: How Does a Bill Move Through the U.S. House of Representatives?

    A: A bill is first introduced by any member of the House of Representatives, then it goes to a committee for study before possibly being added to the House calendar for debate, amendments and then a final vote. If a bill is passed, it goes to the Senate for consideration. A conference committee between both chambers is needed if the Senate passes a different version of the House bill.
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  • What Is the Job Description of a Majority Whip?

    Q: What Is the Job Description of a Majority Whip?

    A: In a legislative body, a majority whip is a member of the dominant political party whose task it is to keep voting members in line with the party's goals and ideologies. About.com expert Robert Longley explains that the majority whip ensures attendance at all important votes and legislative sessions. This official also has the authority to reward and punish members for their compliance or lack thereof.
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  • How Many Justices Serve on the Supreme Court?

    Q: How Many Justices Serve on the Supreme Court?

    A: Nine judges, called justices, form the United States Supreme Court. One of the justices serves as the chief justice, while the remaining eight serve as associate justices. The nine current Supreme Court justices include Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr., Antonin Scalia, Anthony M. Kennedy, Clarence Thomas, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Stephen G. Breyer, Samuel Anthony Alito Jr., Sonia Sotomayor and Elena Kagan.
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  • Who Is the Head of the Legislative Branch?

    Q: Who Is the Head of the Legislative Branch?

    A: Both the Speaker of the House and the Vice President of the United States head the legislative branch of the government. The legislative branch includes the House of Representatives and the Senate.
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  • Which Party Controls the House of Representatives?

    Q: Which Party Controls the House of Representatives?

    A: As of March 26, 2014, the U.S. House of Representatives is controlled by a Republican majority. The Republicans control a total of 233 seats.
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  • How Many People Work in the Pentagon?

    Q: How Many People Work in the Pentagon?

    A: As of 2014, about 23,000 people work in the Pentagon. The staff at the Pentagon includes a combination of civilian and military personnel. The facility was completed in 1943 and was meant to be the hub from which the country managed issues related to World War II.
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  • What Is the Main Purpose of the Executive Branch?

    Q: What Is the Main Purpose of the Executive Branch?

    A: The main purpose of the executive branch is to be sure the laws of the nation are followed and that the responsibilities of government are fulfilled. The executive branch consists of the President, Vice President and Cabinet members.
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