Branches of Government

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There are many benefits to being President of the United States: an annual salary; expense and travel accounts; housing in the White Hose, Camp David, and a guest house; Presidential State Car; Air Force One and Marine One for transportation; protection by the Secret Service; and great retirement benefits. While the position of president is not the most lucrative, the benefits compensate for the pay.

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  • What is the role of the national government?

    Q: What is the role of the national government?

    A: The role of any national government is to protect the safety and well-being of its citizens and the sovereignty of the country's borders. National government is authorized to act based on a legal constitution, federal laws and accepted civil standards. All citizens benefit from agencies and programs created by national government.
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  • What is the name of the presidential helicopter?

    Q: What is the name of the presidential helicopter?

    A: The name or designation of the presidential helicopter is "Marine One." This call sign is assigned to any rotary-type aircraft that is piloted by marines and tasked with transporting the president. According to a Federal Aviation document, the president inherits the call sign of the service, plus "One."
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  • What are the special duties of the United States House of Representatives?

    Q: What are the special duties of the United States House of Representatives?

    A: The special duties of the U.S. House of Representatives include the power to initiate bills to collect tax money and other revenue, the ability to impeach federal officials and the duty to elect the president if there is a tie in the electoral college. In addition to these special duties, the U.S. House of Representatives, along with the U.S. Senate, proposes, studies and votes on legislation that affects the United States at the federal level. In order for a bill to be sent to the president for approval, it must pass both the U.S. House and the U.S. Senate.
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  • How many votes does Congress need to override a veto?

    Q: How many votes does Congress need to override a veto?

    A: A two-thirds majority vote in both the House of Representatives and in the Senate is required to override a presidential veto. The exact number depends on how many representatives vote; therefore, the actual number is subject to change.
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  • Why is Barack Obama a good leader?

    Q: Why is Barack Obama a good leader?

    A: President Barack Obama is a good leader because he is perceptive. As the leader of the free world, President Barack Obama rallies for the people. He understands that the United States can only work as a unit when everyone has the same opportunities in healthcare, education and employment.
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  • How many people are in the U.S. Senate?

    Q: How many people are in the U.S. Senate?

    A: One hundred people serve in the Senate of the United States. Each of the 50 states is guaranteed two Senators. The District of Columbia does not have a U.S. Senator, nor do any of the U.S. territories.
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  • What is judicial power?

    Q: What is judicial power?

    A: Judicial power involves constitutional authority assigned to courts and judges, according to the Free Dictionary. The authority enables them to interpret and apply the law, arbitrate legal disputes and carry out justice.
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  • How does the President check the power of Congress?

    Q: How does the President check the power of Congress?

    A: The primary check the president has on Congress is the ability to veto legislation. The president can also choose to implement legislation in a manner Congress did not intend. Executive orders also give the president significant power.
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  • What is the purpose of legislation?

    Q: What is the purpose of legislation?

    A: The purpose of legislation is to provide a governing framework. According to Cornell University’s Legal Information Institute, legislation includes both the process of statutory formulation and the resulting statute itself. Legislation guides the policy of government and ensures a code of conduct between citizens as well as between the government and citizens. In the United States, the legislative process occurs on both a federal and state level.
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  • What are the qualifications for becoming a U.S. Senator?

    Q: What are the qualifications for becoming a U.S. Senator?

    A: To qualify as a candidate for the office of United States Senator, the person must be at least 30 years old, must reside in the state from which he or she is elected, and must have been a U.S. citizen for a minimum of 9 years. These requirements are set forth in the U.S. Constitution.
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  • Who is the head of the legislative branch?

    Q: Who is the head of the legislative branch?

    A: Both the Speaker of the House and the Vice President of the United States head the legislative branch of the government. The legislative branch includes the House of Representatives and the Senate.
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  • How long is a Senator's term in office?

    Q: How long is a Senator's term in office?

    A: United States senators serve 6-year terms, although they may seek reelection after each term, and there is no formal or official limit to the number of years or terms a senator may serve. Senators may resign voluntarily or opt to not seek reelection, and they can also be formally expelled by the Senate in the case of wrongdoing; in these cases, two-thirds of the Senate must vote for expulsion, and it is very rare for this process to occur. Each senator serves alongside a fellow senator from the same state, and each state in the union is accorded two Senate seats, as are two unofficial "shadow senators" from the District of Columbia.
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  • Which party controls the House of Representatives?

    Q: Which party controls the House of Representatives?

    A: As of March 26, 2014, the U.S. House of Representatives is controlled by a Republican majority. The Republicans control a total of 233 seats.
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  • Do judges make law?

    Q: Do judges make law?

    A: Judges are not responsible for making laws. Judges are responsible for interpreting laws, assessing any evidence presented and imposing penalties while remaining impartial in their rulings to ensure justice is fairly served.
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  • What does the president's cabinet do?

    Q: What does the president's cabinet do?

    A: The role of the president’s cabinet is split into two broad categories: advising the president on issues to do with policy and carrying out any agreed upon plans. U.S. Cabinet members are given the title of Secretary.
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  • What are the duties of the U.S. Senate?

    Q: What are the duties of the U.S. Senate?

    A: The U.S. Senate proposes and considers new laws, approves or rejects presidential nominations, provides advice and consent on international treaties, and serves as the high court for impeachment trials. Although the U.S. House of Representatives also works on new legislation, only the Senate performs the other three duties.
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  • What are the three levels of state courts in the United States?

    Q: What are the three levels of state courts in the United States?

    A: The three levels of state courts in the Unites States are the trial level, the intermediate appellate level and the high appellate level. In some states, the higher trial court is known as the general jurisdiction or the superior court, while the lower level of the trial court is referred to as the limited jurisdiction or the municipal court.
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  • How do you apply for Obamacare?

    Q: How do you apply for Obamacare?

    A: In order to make signing up for health insurance under the Affordable Care Act as easy as possible, the Obama administration has set up a central website, Healthcare.gov, to handle applications. Entering your information into this site allows the site to guide you through the process of establishing health insurance for yourself and your family.
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  • What are the express powers of Congress?

    Q: What are the express powers of Congress?

    A: The express powers of Congress are those powers granted specifically in the United States Constitution, which include the ability to make laws, amend the Constitution and declare war. Additionally, Congress is also responsible for the United States Postal Service. The House of Representatives also has ability to initiate tax laws and call for the impeachment of government officials. The Senate approves all Presidential appointments and tries government officials for impeachment.
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  • What are examples of judicial power?

    Q: What are examples of judicial power?

    A: The judicial system's power relies on the structure of checks and balances in government. The judicial branch of government includes the Supreme Court, courts of appeal and district courts. The judicial branch checks both the executive and legislative branch, but it also follows balances from these two branches. It has the power to enforce law and order and protect the rights of the citizenry.
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  • How long was John F. Kennedy in office?

    Q: How long was John F. Kennedy in office?

    A: John F. Kennedy was in office for 2 years and 10 months. He defeated Richard Nixon to become the 35th President on January 20, 1961. He was assassinated by Lee Harvey Oswald while riding in a motorcade in Dallas, TX on November 22, 1963.
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