Q:

What are some examples of Naval terminology?

A:

Quick Answer

Some Naval terms include "cup of joe," which means a cup of coffee, "deep six," which means to dispose of or throw something away, and "cast off," which means to let go, throw off or unfurl. A "chit book" is a receipt booklet or a coupon.

Continue Reading

Full Answer

In the navy, a person or officer who has crossed the Antarctic or the Arctic circle may be referred to as a "blue nose." A "scuttlebutt" was once the terminology for a water fountain, but it became the word for a place where sailors would congregate. It now refers to gossip or rumors, as of 2015.

The "lifelines" on a boat are the lines that surround the weather decks to prevent people from falling over the edge. "Mess duty" is a period of obligatory work duty in the crew's dining hall that new sailors must perform for the first 90 days when they first join a crew. The dining hall is referred to as a "mess deck."

"Liberty" is what Naval officers call being allowed to leave the base. This liberty period does not usually last for more than two days. Similarly, "leave" is an authorized period of absence, much like a vacation. A "grad and go" is a person who graduates boot camp and leaves for the next duty station shortly after.

Learn more about Military
Sources:

Related Questions

Explore