Q:

What are some examples of double jeopardy?

A:

Quick Answer

An example of implementation of double jeopardy laws occurred in 2013 when Sharone Brown avoided murder charges after previously accepting a guilty plea for misdemeanor assault, reports The Dallas Morning News. Double jeopardy laws protect a defendant from being tried multiple times for the same alleged crime.

Continue Reading
What are some examples of double jeopardy?
Credit: ericsphotography E+ Getty Images

Full Answer

The Dallas Morning News reports that Sharone Brown, age 61, was accused of brutally assaulting his girlfriend, Sherry Whitacre, in April 2013. Prosecutors were unaware of Whitacre's death when they offered Brown a plea deal, and the incident was ruled a homicide a few days later.

In a 2011 example of double jeopardy laws, NBCNews.com reports that Isaac Turnbaugh was acquitted in 2004 for the shooting death of his coworker, Declan Lyons. When Turnbaugh voluntarily contacted Randolph police in July 2011 claiming that he had killed Lyons with a rifle, authorities were unable to retry him.

Learn more about Law

Related Questions

  • Q:

    Is there a time limit to pressing charges?

    A:

    There is a time limit to pressing charges for most crimes in the United States, with the exception of murder. However, serious crimes involving violence, arson, kidnapping or forgery have no time limit for pressing charges in many states, reports FindLaw.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What are some motion to reopen case samples?

    A:

    In 2015, the Maryland Court of Special Appeals granted a motion to reopen the murder conviction of Adnan Syed, reports International Business Times, while a Kent County, Delaware, Family Court denied a motion to reopen a civil protection order hearing involving NASCAR driver Kurt Busch, notes Fox Sports. Testimony in Syed's case was cast in doubt after a witness backtracked. Kent County commissioner David Jones decided that Busch did not provide sufficient new evidence to reverse the Court's previous ruling.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What are the consequences of harboring a runaway?

    A:

    The potential consequences of harboring a runaway include criminal charges and civil liability suits, says Nolo. Laws vary from one state to another, but many states have laws against contributing to the delinquency of a minor.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is a good example of a breach of duty for a negligence lawsuit?

    A:

    An example of breach of duty is a motor vehicle accident in which it's alleged that a defendant failed to obey the traffic laws under the applicable vehicle code. The duty to obey traffic laws is established by the vehicle code, and failing to stop at a red light or driving too fast is the breach of that duty.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore