Q:

What are some examples of delegated powers?

A:

Quick Answer

Examples of delegated powers include the power to regulate commerce with foreign nations, to collect taxes, to borrow money on behalf of the United States, to declare war and to enter treaties. The delegation of power refers to the distinct powers and abilities given to each branch of government.

Continue Reading

Full Answer

Delegated powers are also known as enumerated powers. These powers include the ability to raise and support armies, to provide and maintain a navy and to regulate interstate commerce. The U.S. government has several enumerated powers that the government must execute jointly with specific states. These include the power to tax, fix standard weights and develop or maintain courts.

Learn more about Branches of Government

Related Questions

  • Q:

    What is the difference between federal and state governments?

    A:

    The federal government, under the powers of the U.S. Constitution, is given the power to make laws, veto laws, oversee foreign policy and national defense, impose tariffs, impeach officials, enter into treaties, interpret the Constitution, interpret laws and revise laws that allow one state to impede on the rights of another. Beyond that, the 10th amendment gives power to the states to govern themselves.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What are the powers of Congress?

    A:

    Congress has the power to make new laws, change existing laws, raise and support armed forces, declare war, establish post offices, secure patents and copyrights, collect taxes, regulate commerce, oversee the national budget and regulate other aspects of national finances. It also has the power to investigate other branches of government, confirm presidential appointments, ratify treaties and impeach the president and other federal officials.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What are some examples of checks on the president's power?

    A:

    Congress checks the president's power by overriding presidential vetoes, controlling the funding of the president's actions, approving treaties, approving presidential appointments and having the power to impeach the president. The Supreme Court checks the president by judging presidential actions to be unconstitutional. The Supreme Court judges have complete autonomy after they are appointed to ensure a balance of power between the executive and judicial branches of the federal government.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What are examples of a chief legislator?

    A:

    A chief legislator most often refers to the president of the United States, who has the authority to influence members of Congress to make laws through veto power, signing a bill, speaking directly to Congress and meeting with individual members of the legislative body. Article II, Section 3 of the Constitution of the United States gives the president the authority to "recommend... such measures as... necessary and expedient."

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore