Q:

What are some examples of copyright infringement?

A:

Quick Answer

Examples of copyright infringement include making or distributing copies, using all or a part of a copyrighted work, sampling a song or generally using copyrighted work without permission. Even derivative work based on a copyrighted piece is infringement unless permission is obtained from the copyright owner.

Continue Reading
What are some examples of copyright infringement?
Credit: Horia Varlan CC-BY 2.0

Full Answer

Anyone who records a film or uploads a copy to the Internet, downloads a song without paying for it, copies a book and distributes it, or uses a photograph without obtaining permission is infringing on the owner's copyright protection. Derivative works can fall under fair use, making them legal without obtaining permission, if the derivative work is different enough from the original that it changes the meaning of the piece.

Learn more about Crime

Related Questions

  • Q:

    What are the laws on downloading copyrighted movies for free?

    A:

    Those who download copyrighted material such as movies without permission of the owners are guilty of copyright infringement and liable for damages under copyright law, reports the U.S. Copyright Office. Even if a film doesn't carry a copyright notice, it is protected by copyright as soon as it is created.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What are the laws about downloading videos for free?

    A:

    Downloading videos of copyrighted material for free, without permission of the copyright owner, is legally called infringement and is prohibited by law, states New Media Rights. Such actions can lead to lawsuits against the individual downloading the copyrighted material. Previous defendants in such infringement cases have been required to pay damages for each illegal download, adding up to substantial amounts of money.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How do I go about asking permission to write about licensed characters, Greek gods and Titans?

    A:

    To use licensed characters, a writer must first identify who owns the trademark or copyright and then obtain permission, says LegalZoom. To reproduce the image of a Disney cartoon character, a writer would check the Disney website to learn who owns the character, then apply for written permission. Greek gods and Titans are in the public domain, as U.S. copyright laws apply for only 70 years after the author's death.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is a copyright search?

    A:

    A copyright search is a search for who owns the rights to written, created or published materials such as books, music, art, periodicals, etc. Copyrighted material cannot be copied or used for profit without obtaining permission from the owner of the copyright.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore